New Hampshire Farmers Museum

New Hampshire Farmers Museum.jpg
1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton, NH, United States

The New Hampshire Farm Museum is a non-profit 501 c3 educational organization dedicated to preserving, promoting and carrying forward New Hampshire’s rural and agricultural heritage. The New Hampshire Farm Museum consists of two adjoining farmsteads situated on 50 acres located on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, New Hampshire. The historic Jones Farm and the Plummer Homestead are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and were passed down in the same families for two centuries. The Museum operates a working farm growing heirloom varieties of vegetables for our Community Supported Agriculture Program and for sale in our Country store. We raise hens for eggs and keep a small selection of heritage breed farm animals to support our educational efforts. We have displays of agricultural implements and educational exhibits on rural life and agriculture for the visiting public and our many visiting school children. We offer guided tours of the historic Jones farmhouse as well as farm animal tours. Special events and programs, workshops, and day camps are offered throughout the year.

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Planning Your Group Visit

School, homeschools, scouting or camp groups are all welcome at the New Hampshire Farm Museum We need a minimum of 10 children or $60. to run a program. The museum accepts school and youth group visits from May 1st through December. Visits can be scheduled Tuesday through Friday 9:00 am to 4:00 pm depending on the program.

To Schedule Your Visit : Please call 603-652-7840 or email: info@farmmuseum.org.

We recommend one chaperon per ten students. Chaperons or home school parents are charged at half the student rate. There is no charge for teachers, group leaders, counselors or bus drivers or children ages 3 and under. In good weather students can pack a lunch to eat in our picnic area. We have an outdoor handicapped accessible restroom/port-a-potty. We can show students historic games like hoop rolling and graces for all to play with during lunch. We welcome students to shop in our Country Store if permitted during lunch break. The store contains many inexpensive items, educational toys, juice and soda, penny candy and farm grown produce and eggs.

School and Youth Programs at the NH Farm Museum

The New Hampshire Farm Museum provides a wonderful, hands-on opportunity for your students to explore New Hampshire’s agricultural heritage and see where farming and technology intersect with New Hampshire history.  Students who visit the museum have the opportunity to tour a working organic farm and learn about agricultural practices such as the “three sisters”, a method of co-planting corn, beans, and squash that the European settlers learned from the Native Americans. In addition to being a working farm, the museum is home to a vast collection of historic agricultural implements and artifacts of rural life including Daniel Webster’s plow and Horace Greeley’s privy and two historic farmhouses. No visit is complete without a chance to interact with the heritage breed farm animals!

Any of the following educational programs offered by the museum can be easily adapted to fit your curriculum and meet your class’s specific needs.

The Ox-Cart Man: Farms & Families at Work 

Program recommended for grades k-3. Offered May-mid-November. Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum, Approx. 3 hours

In this hands-on program based on NH poet Donald Hall’s story, The Ox-Cart Man, children explore the way families lived and worked in the past throughout rural New England. The students tour the 18th-century farmhouse cape and learn about the roles of each member of the household and how each was needed to make the family’s living. In gathering farm products to bring to market, they learn about the artifacts and objects of daily life in Colonial times. On their hunt through the barn they search for many of the farm objects depicted in the story and learn about barter and trade. Students make butter, meet our sheep, chickens, turkeys and pig, work with wool, try a planting or harvesting activity and help pack the ox-cart for the trip to Portsmouth.

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: Rural Life & Technological/Agricultural Evolution 

Program recommended for students grades 3-8. Offered May-mid-November Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum. Approx. 3 hours

The Jones Farmstead consists of a set of connected farm buildings referred to in an old children’s rhyme as, “Big House, little house, back house, barn.” Each piece of this connected farm structure tells a different story about New Hampshire history from Colonial times to the Twentieth century. In this hands-on program students learn about rural life and technological and agricultural change in New England as they tour the historic farmhouse, hunt for artifacts in the barn, and participate in farm chores. Students will view “Hands to Work,” a short film which uses oral histories and historic photographs of New Hampshire farming. They will try farm chores like grinding corn, carrying water with a yoke, and doing the wash. They will visit the farm animals and make butter. This program can be used supplement lessons on the transition from farms to factories as part of economic evolution or adapted to fit a range of other learning goals.

Hands to Work Program for Pre-schoolers

Program recommended for children ages 3-5 yrs. Offered May through mid-November. Cost: $5 per child. 10 student minimum- maximum: 25. Approx. 2 hours.

Children will learn all about the work on the farm and how the children helped in this completely hands-on program for pre-schoolers. They will grind the corn to feed the chickens, do the wash with washtub and wringer, pump the water at the well, feel the wool from the sheep, churn the cream to make butter, plant a seed or harvest the vegetables depending on the season and explore the Big Yellow Barn to hunt for fun things related to the farm.

An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving on the Farm 

Program recommended for children grades K – 5. Offered November 1st through November 20th. Cost: $7 per child 10 student minimum- maximum 45. Approx. 2 ½ hours.

New Hampshire has a special connection to Thanksgiving as it was our own Sarah Josepha Hale who persuaded President Lincoln in 1863 to declare it a National Holiday. Students will enjoy a tour through the historic farmhouse with costumed roleplayers portraying the Civil War Era. Then they will learn to grind and pound flint corn to make our cornbread and to churn cream into butter for our bread and press apples to make cider for us to drink. We will also explore the 104 ft. long great barn on a special barn hunt and visit with our heritage breed turkeys and other farm animals.

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Location Images
Admisson and Location Hours

2014 Hours & Admission


Open weekends through October then Saturdays only through November 23rd 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Also open weekdays for school & group tours by reservation and special programs and events. Check our calendar.

The last farmhouse tour leaves at 3:30 pm

Museum General Admission Fees ~ Full Season
$7 adult
$4 child ages 4-17 yrs (children under 4 no charge)
$20 family rate (2 adults & their children or grandchildren)
$6 senior/student – applies to all school/group programs for children ages 4 and up.

Museum Members are admitted free of charge during regular season except for special fundraising events and off-season where discounted admission to workshops and programs is offered.

Your Visit

Enjoy a visit to our historic working farm and museum. There is plenty to see from agricultural exhibits to heritage breed farm animals and fields of heirloom vegetables and gardens as well as displays of carriages and tractors and guided tours of the historic Jones Farmhouse. We have trails through the woods and fields and picnic tables. You can spend two hours or bring a picnic and spend the day. Or just visit our Country Store for our own farm grown vegetables, eggs from our free range chickens and New Hampshire made products.

Just a few things to keep in mind:

  • Photography is welcome but not allowed on the Farmhouse tour except by special arrangement.
  • We’re sorry but dogs are not allowed on museum grounds.
  • Smoking is not allowed on museum grounds.
  • Most buildings are handicapped accessible including the Country Store, the historic farmhouse and the barn.

What To See

The Jones Farmhouse:  available by guided tour only, tours hourly.

The Jones Farm and connected farm buildings extend 275 feet and range in date from the 1770s to the early 1900s. Each part of the connected farm structure tells a different story about rural life and work in the past. A tour of the Jones farmhouse allows the visitor to walk through time from Joseph Plumer’s Revolutionary War Era cape, to Levi Jones’ early 19th-century tavern, into the Victorian parlor and dining room, and ending in the early 20th-century farm kitchen. In the Jones farmhouse you will find a vast collection of artifacts utilized in domestic production of textiles and preservation of food, furnishings and myriad household articles highlighting “Yankee ingenuity”.

The Great Barn:  explore on your own

Housed within the three-story, 104-foot Great Barn at the Jones Farm is one of New Hampshire’s greatest treasures: a collection of farm tools, implements, and machinery that was used to clear land, plant fields, harvest crops, construct buildings, and maintain community roads. You’ll also see perhaps the most extensive collection of milk bottles from the dairies the once proliferated the New Hampshire countryside. Try the big yellow barn hunt or just look at the exhibits.

The Plummer Homestead:  Farmer’s residence, not open to the public

The adjoining farmhouse was acquired by the NH Farm Museum in 1993. The Plummer homestead was owned by the Plummer family (originally spelled Plumer) for two centuries. The Plummer Farm houses our farmer and interns and is only open to the public for scheduled workshops and programs, lectures, guided tours, and special events such as our summer annual meeting and our holiday Wine & Cheese Tasting. The Plummer homestead is the base for our farm operation and houses the main collection of farm animals.

The John York Cider Mill: explore on your own

Between the Jones and the Plummer farms sits a hexagonal-shaped timber frame building. The building was constructed by volunteers in 2001 and houses an apple exhibit and a massive horse-powered knob mill that dates to the early 19th century. Cider was the most common table drink of early New England and most towns had at least one or two cider mills. Our cider mill is dedicated to John York, one of the founders of the Farm Museum.

The Pole Barn Tractor & Carriage Display:  explore on your own

Our collection of historic tractors and carriages is on display in the pole barn which was constructed by volunteers in 2000.

The Blacksmith Shop:  Open for demonstrations most Saturdays

Although the blacksmith shop is not original to the Jones Farm (it was moved here from Winnisquam), it is representative of farm structures common to rural New Hampshire. Farmers often adopted a skill such as blacksmithing which allowed them to repair their own equipment, make their tools, and shoe their horses as well as diversify their income doing these tasks for others. This shop was built by Charles Cate in Winnisquam and was later moved to Belmont where it stood on the farm of the late Arthur Hill.  Many of the tools in the shop came from these two owners and date to the  mid- 19th century.

The Shoe Shop

The shoe shop was relocated to the Farm Museum from Newton Junction, NH, where it was built around 1870. Small structures like our shoe shop were common rural structures known as “ten footers” as they are about ten foot square. This shop was used for piecework and the assembly of shoes; this kind of skill allowed farm families to earn cash during the long winter.

The Forest Trails: ask for a map in our Country Store

The Farm Museum’s 50 acres of fields and forest include a beautiful network of woodland trails. Bring your hiking boots and explore the trails as well as the adjacent 300-acre Jones Forest owned by the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests. You may also want to include a visit to the family cemetery on your hike

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