Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden

Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden.jpg
28 Deveau Road, North Salem, NY, United States

The Hammond Museum & Japanese Stroll Garden in North Salem is one of only 2 Japanese Gardens open regularly to the public in New York State. The other one is the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in Brooklyn, N. Y. Partly as a result of a 1988 report on the Hammond Museum funded by NYSCA, The Hammond Museum has redefined and focused its mission as an institution that centers on the presentation, illumination and exhibition of Asian art and culture with the Japanese Stroll Garden as the centerpiece of the Museum’s permanent collection. The Museum seeks to develop itself as a resource for students and people wanting to learn about Asian culture and also as a place where people of Asian Heritage may celebrate their cultural background.

The Japanese Garden is a primary resource that needs to be developed along specific lines as a tool for learning. The board of trustees, the staff and volunteers are trained to view the garden as a work of art – not just as a collection of trees and shrubs. Tours of the garden are given with an emphasis on principles of Asian aesthetics and philosophy, not as a horticultural phenomenon. Visitors are asked to make connections with items on exhibit whether they are from the Museum’s permanent collection or on loan.

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Educational Tours

The Hammond Museum is seeking funds to continue Saturday Educational/Craft Activities and to expand and develop this program into the creation of a resource center for students and visitors with primary and secondary multi media research tools in the areax of Asian culture, art and history.The Hammond Museum & Japanese Stroll Garden in North Salem is one of only 2 Japanese Gardens open regularly to the public in New York State. The other one is the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in Brooklyn, N. Y. Partly as a result of a 1988 report on the Hammond Museum funded by NYSCA, The Hammond Museum has redefined and focused its mission as an institution that centers on the presentation, illumination and exhibition of Asian art and culture with the Japanese Stroll Garden as the centerpiece of the Museum’s permanent collection. The Museum seeks to develop itself as a resource for students and people wanting to learn about Asian culture and also as a place where people of Asian Heritage may celebrate their cultural background.

The Japanese Garden is a primary resource that needs to be developed along specific lines as a tool for learning. The board of trustees, the staff and volunteers are trained to view the garden as a work of art – not just as a collection of trees and shrubs. Tours of the garden are given with an emphasis on principles of Asian aesthetics and philosophy, not as a horticultural phenomenon. Visitors are asked to make connections with items on exhibit whether they are from the Museum’s permanent collection or on loan.



During the academic year, the Hammond receives requests every week from middle and high school students asking for information on many different aspects of Asian culture. The topics range from Buddhism to Noh theatre. The Museum is only able to direct these students to several Internet sites and to the White Plains Library. The Board is committed to fulfilling the Museum’s reputation as a resource by developing a facility that will use our permanent collection and adjunct materials to answer the research needs and curiosity of the local population.

The Museum is asking for funds to plan and develop a resource center for students and people interested in Asian culture which would use the Garden and other permanent collection items (Fans, prints, kimonos, ceramics) as primary source material. The goal of the Museum is to have this resource center be available to schools during the academic day and to students and visitors during times when the schools.



The importance of first hand experience in the learning process has been amply demonstrated to have a significant impact on students’ understanding of “difficult” subject matter. It is also important for teachers whose own education and experience are dominantly eurocentric to be able to trust and rely on outside resources for backup with this expanded curriculum. This dual role of backing up teachers and making an impact on students is a role that the Hammond Museum is in a unique position to develop.

The current New York State curriculum for the instruction of Global History in the 9th and 10th grade includes significant segments on Asia which seek not only to teach chronologically sequential periods in Asian history but also to develop an understanding of beliefs and cultural aesthetics which developed in the Eastern Hemisphere. In order to successfully complete the Regents examination, students are being asked to understand how the birth of an idea or technology in one part of the world affected the development of mankind in other parts of the world. For instance, students must have an understanding of world religions and how they spread and evolved, including Buddhism and Taoism. By comparing tangible objects with the ideas expressed in the Japanese Garden, students will be better equipped to make the connections and comparisons being asked of them.



The Museum is fortunate in that we will be able to work closely with the students and teachers from the North Salem Schools to monitor and assess the program as it grows. However, we need to call in educational consultants, an architect and curators to plan and develop this unique program which will be an important step in the development of the Museum and also serve the needs of Westchester, Putnam and possibly Dutchess and Rockland Counties.

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Additional Information

To make School Group Tour reservations, click link below

Location Images
Admisson and Location Hours

Museum and Garden Hours:

Wednesday – Saturday

12 PM to 4 PM

Admission to the Museum, Garden and Cafe is free with membership or:

$5 for adults, $4 for seniors, children under 12 are free.

Additional hours and guided tours are available for groups of 10 or more. 

Please call 914-669-5033 or e-mail us by clicking here.

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