Museums

Museums

Delaware Sports Museum Logo.jpg
800-899 N Madison St, Wilmington, DE, United States

As part of the celebration of the nation’s bicentennial in 1976, Delaware’s American Bicentennial Commission formed the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame with University of Delaware football coach ”Tubby” Raymond at the helm and Al Cartwright, chair of the hall of fame subcommittee

For periods of time, inductee’s plaques were placed on display at the Grand Opera House, Bank of Delaware, the Wilmington Senior Center and the Balick Store. In later years a search for a permanent home began in earnest.

Horse racing exhibitThe quest finally paid off when in 1993 the Delaware Sports Authority allocated what would become 5000 square feet for a permanent home for the Hall and Museum at the new Daniel Frawley Stadium built for the Wilmington Blue Rocks.

Click on the museum page for special exhibits and other happenings on the Wilmington Riverfront.


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School field Trips at the Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame

Located at Frawley Stadium – on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Delaware -the museum offers visitors the opportunity to see and hear Delaware sports figures describe their experiences.

Visitors will witness Hall of Famer “Judy” Johnson tell his story to a young fan. Relive athletes winning Olympic Gold Medals, the University of Delaware’s NCAA Football titles, exhibits honoring Delaware’s Special Olympians, pro baseball, football, basketball and soccer teams.

The Museum has computers and touch screens which allow visitors to learn about all inductees, Special Olympics and individual sports halls of fame.

Delaware sports history from Civil War days to the present comes alive through photos, audio & video presentations, artifacts, and memorabilia. Decade by decade exhibits tell the story of the accomplishments of the First State’s athletes, coaches, officials, administrators, sportswriters and broadcasters. Over two hundred and twenty people have been inducted into the Delaware Sports Hall of Fame. Visitors can access special computers with biographies and photos.

THE “HALLWAY OF THE DECADES”

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Wright Museum.jpg
77 Center Street, Wolfeboro, NH, United States

The Wright Museum’s mission is to preserve and share the stories of America’s Greatest Generation for the benefit of generations to come. As a one-of-a-kind non-profit institution, the Wright Museum collects and displays artifacts that illustrate the Second World War’s significant and lasting impact on American life.

During WWII, Americans from all walks of life pulled together to defend freedom against a global threat to our commonly-held values of life, liberty, and the pursuit of a better life. Hardened by the privations of the Great Depression, Americans were primed for the sacrifices necessary to thwart the forces assembled against them.

The Wright Museum consists of three distinct sections: a home front gallery and theater, a two-story Visitor’s Center, and the museum’s military wing, which houses exhibits devoted to all branches of the armed services. Among the highlights of the museum’s military exhibition is a large collection of fully-operational vintage military vehicles, including a 42-ton Pershing tank – the only known surviving example from the 1945 crossing at Remagen Bridge.

Twice a year, we make this collection available for rides for the general public. 2012 will mark the 15th year that the Wright Museum will host its annual Family Day event. The cost of admission includes two vehicle rides, a BBQ lunch, and much more.

The entire museum is air-conditioned, wheelchair accessible, and the parking lot has ample space for tour buses.

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Wright Museum for School Groups Trips Grades 3 – 12 

Make the Past Come Alive for Your Students!

Thank you from the Tuftonboro Central School children sent to the Wright Museum

The Wright Museum is the region’s leading resource for educators and learners of all ages interested in the Second World War. The museum shares its rich collection of artifacts through dozens of exhibits that illustrate the American WWII experience.

A visit to the Wright Museum is an ideal introduction to or culmination of your WWII instructional unit. Call the Wright Museum today at 603/569-1212 to learn more and schedule your class visit today! You may also e-mail us atdonna.hamill@wrightmuseum.org for more information.

The Wright Museum Experience

Educational Programs at the Wright Museum

“Check out the tank!”, “Incredible experience,” and “You help keep the past alive” are just a few of the quotes heard from the thousands of students, grades 3 through 12, who have toured the museum over the past 16 years .

Tours begin with a brief orientation lecture and video to introduce or reinforce the broader historical context of the museum’s exhibits.

During the course of their tour, visitors of all ages come away with a fuller understanding of the values, sacrifices and spirit of cooperation that contributed to the Allied victory.

Volunteers, many of whom served during the war or who can recall their Home Front experiences, assist with tours. Grade-appropriate materials are given to instructors with pre-tour and post-tour study suggestions.

For more information about how you can integrate a museum visit into your U.S. History/WWII unit, please call 603/569-1212.

Preparation Materials

Teachers may download materials for use prior to and during their students’ visit to help provide an appropriate level of focus. Materials are grade-level appropriate for upper elementary, middle, and high school students.

Grades 4-6

Grades 7-9

Grades 10-12

Take a Sentimental Journey through Dozens of Great Exhibits!

Military Wing of the Wright Museum

Fascinating exhibits laden with vintage artifacts and interactive displays bring to life the American WWII experience. A collection of dozens of fully-operational military vehicles lies at the core of the Wright Museum’s collection. In addition to the thousands of square feet devoted to telling the stories of Americans on the frontlines, extensive displays also illustrate the transformative changes that took place on the home front.

Plan your visit today. Among the museum’s highlights are fully-furnished period vignettes including a 1942 gas station, corner soda fountain, and dentist office.  Learn about:

  • Child Life in the 40s
  • Entertainment and Popular Culture
  • Citizen Support for the War Effort
  • Recycling and Rationing
  • Scientific and Technological Advances
  • Women’s Role on the Home Front

 Traveling Trunk

This resource contains WWII artifacts (some real, some reproductions) with related worksheets, audio-visual tools, and other educational activities designed to meet New Hampshire Curriculum Framework and Lesson Plans.

Travelling History Trunk

Activities include figuring ration plans, learning about what was produced in New Hampshire for the war effort, Civil Defense, War Bonds, and creating a Victory Garden. The trunk is available to schools and can be used in the classroom for up to two weeks.

Both the Stories in the Classroom and the Traveling Trunk are free and are a part of the Wright’s effort to bring the museum to students in the Granite State and beyond.

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Winterthur Logo.jpg
5105 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, DE, United States

Founded by Henry Francis du Pont, Winterthur (pronounced “winter-tour”) is the premier museum of American decorative arts, reflecting both early America and the du Pont family’s life here. We offer programs for School as part of a School Field trip, Family programs as well offer Teacher Workshops and College Student programs. Its 60-acre naturalistic garden is among the country’s best, and its research library serves scholars from around the world. We invite you to visit and explore this place of beauty, history, and learning.

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School Field Trips at the Winterthur (pre-K to Elementary)

Winterthur School Field Trip Programs

Programs that meet an array of curriculum standards are offered on and off site for students from preschool through high school, including homeschoolers. Special tours for college groups are also available.

School Field Trips Pre-School & Elementary Programs

Adopt an Object

Grades Pre-K to 2 (School Field Trips Program)

Students investigate daily life in the past through the study of household objects. Learn about shapes, materials, and basic economics while role-playing, making comparisons, and participating in a story.

Program length: 1½ hours

Reinforces Delaware standards: Math 2, 8; Science 2, 3; Civics 4; Economics 1, 2, 3; History 2, 4; English 2; Visual Arts 1, 2, 3


Wonder & Wander in Enchanted Woods

Grades Pre-K to 2 (School Field Trips Program)

Wander garden paths on a wondrous walk to Enchanted Woods and discover a new appreciation of nature. Check out the new Upside-Down tree house that just opened in June. Includes storytelling and free time for imaginative play.

Program length:1½ hours

Available April–October


Bugs in the Museum

Grades Pre-K to 5 (School Field Trips Program)

Winterthur’s collection includes objects decorated with bugs, products made by (or from) bugs, and even a few things that bugs have destroyed. Investigate the important roles played by bugs in the past (and today!), and explore ways to keep your own prized possessions from falling prey to vicious vermin.

Program length:  1½ hours

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Science 1, 2, 6, 8; History 3; Geography 3; English/Language Arts 4; Visual Arts 1, 3, 4, 6


Plain and Fancy

Grades 2–4 (School Field Trips Program)

How and why do people decorate their possessions? Learn about the practice of decorating textiles with weaving, embroidery, and dyeing in the 1700s and 1800s.

Program length: 1¾ hours

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Math 8; Science 2, 8; Economics 1, 2; Geography 3; History 2, 3; English/Language Arts 1, 2; Visual Arts 4

 


Discover the “Secret” Garden of Winterthur

Grades 2–(School Field Trips Program)

Find shapes in the Reflecting Pool, spot frogs in the pond, wander along the paths, and enjoy the magnificent trees. Learn about the plants blooming in the garden and gaze at the clouds and birds.

Program length:1½ hours

Max. 60 students.

Available April–October

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Science 2 (Geography); Math 8; Science 8


Museum Mystery

Grades 4–6 (School Field Trips Program)

Using scientific evidence and finely-honed problem-solving skills, discover whether George Washington actually sat in a chair that is on display in the Galleries. Students familiar with The Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, will appreciate the similarities between mysteries, but it is not necessary to be familiar with that book for this program.

Program length: 1¾ hours

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Social Science & Geography 1; Social Science, History 2, 3; Visual Arts 4, 5, 6

 


Maker and Marketplace

Grades 4–6 (School Field Trips Program)

Local and global economies, geography, and history come together as students study the roles of craftsmen and shopkeepers in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Program length: 1¾ hours

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Math 1, 5, 8, 10; Science 1, 2; Geography 1, 2, 3; Economics 1, 2, 3, 4; History 2, 4; English/Language Arts 1; Visual Arts 3


Work and Play the Winterthur Way

Grades K–6  (School Field Trips Program)

Through games, puzzles, and hands-on projects, explore the various activities that engaged people who lived and worked at Winterthur. A kid-friendly tour of the Winterthur house and outdoor activities illustrate life on a country estate from many different perspectives.

Program length: 2 hours

Maximum 60 students.

Available June–August


Outreach Pre-School & Elementary Programs

Nursery Rhymes

Ages 3½–5½ (Outreach School Field Trips)

Jack be nimble, Jack be quick, Jack jump over the candlestick! This program teaches children about life long ago through hands-on activities related to nursery rhymes.

Program length: 1 hour

Builds language, social, math, and gross and fine motor skills


Soup’s On!

Age 4 to 1st grade  (Outreach School Field Trips)

Winterthur’s unique assortment of soup tureens and the centuries-old folktale Stone Soup provide the foundation for this program, which engages children in imaginative role-playing while teaching them about collections and life long ago. Includes hands-on activities.

Program length: 1 hour

Builds language, social, and gross and fine motor skills


How do we Decorate Things?

Pre-K and K  (Outreach School Field Trips)

Using objects from our demonstration collection, students learn how items were decorated with color, shapes, and motifs. Includes art activity.

Program length: 45 minutes

Feeds into Delaware standards for History and Visual Arts


Once Upon a Playtime

Grades Pre-K–5  (Outreach School Field Trips)

Children are introduced to the concepts of childhood and leisure activities from long ago through toys and games, such as Alphabet Gymnastics, Jacob’s Ladders, tops, buzz saws, and more. Includes demonstrations and time for hands-on play.

Program length: 1 hour

Reinforces Delaware Standards: History 2, 3, 4


Going to Market with “The Ox-Cart Man”

Grades 1-2  (Outreach School Field Trips)

Children help tell a favorite story about life long ago—The Ox-Cart Man by Donald

Hall—using objects from Winterthur’s demonstration collection. Includes writing activity.

1 hour

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Economics 2; Geography 1, 2, 4; History 1, 3; English/Language Arts 2


Meet George Washington’s Family

Grades 3–5  (Outreach School Field Trips)

George Washington wasn’t just a general and a president. Students learn more about him and other members of his household through examining reproductions of period possessions and clothing.

Program length: 1 hour

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Economics 3; History 1, 2, 4; English/Language Arts 2; Visual Arts 4


A Proper Day’s Work

Grades 3–5  (Outreach School Field Trips)

Students role-play, tackling the daily chores of Laura Ingalls Wilder. They’ll “wash” clothes and “bake” bread using demonstration collection objects.

Program length: 1 hour

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Science 2, 3; History 2; English/Language Arts 2, 4


Working in Early America

Grades 5–8  (Outreach School Field Trips)

Using several objects and tools from our demonstration collection, students learn how skilled craftspeople—a potter, a tinsmith, and a tailor—met basic human needs in early America.

Program length: 45 minutes

Reinforces Delaware standards: Science 2; Economics 3; History 2; English/Language Arts 2; Visual Arts 4

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School Field Trips at the Winterthur (6 – 12 Grade)

Winterthur School Field Trip Programs

Programs that meet an array of curriculum standards are offered on and off site for students from preschool through high school, including homeschoolers. Special tours for college groups are also available.

School Field Trips for Middle & High School Programs

American Decorative Arts

Grades 6–12 (School Field Trips)

Explore the characteristics of decorative arts and furniture styles popular from 1640 to 1860. Students handle and examine objects and take a tour through period rooms to observe design history and principles. Ideal for history, visual art, art history, interior design, and home economics students.

Program length: 2 hours

Maximum 45 students

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Visual Arts 4, 5, 6; History 1, 2


Ritual and Revolution: The Importance of Tea

Grades 6–12 (School Field Trips)

Students discover how Colonial America’s ritual of tea drinking helped create the social, economic, and political forces that played a role in the Revolution. Investigate 18th-century life through tea drinking and discover tea’s social rituals, political symbolism, and economic power. Includes a primary-source activity relating to the Boston Tea Party.

Program length: 1¾ hours

Reinforces Delaware Standards: Civics 1, 4; Economics 1, 4; Geography 4; History 2, 3, 4; Visual Arts 4, 5, 6; English/Language Arts 3, 4


East Egg, West Egg

Grades 9-12 (School Field Trips)

Tour the home of Henry Francis du Pont and compare and contrast his lifestyle with that of a few of his contemporaries: the major characters in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby. This program can also be readily adapted to a 45-minute in-class experience.

Program length: 2 hours

Available March-October

Reinforces Delaware Standards: History 1-4; English/Language Arts 1-4; Visual Arts 3, 4, 6


Outreach Middle & High School Programs

Working in Early America

Grades 5–8 (Outreach School Field Trips)

Using several objects and tools from our demonstration collection, students learn how skilled craftspeople—a potter, a tinsmith, and a tailor—met basic human needs in early America.

Program length: 45 minutes

Reinforces Delaware standards: Science 2; Economics 3; History 2; English/Language Arts 2; Visual Arts 4


There’s History in Things

Grades 6–12 (Outreach School Field Trips)

Objects can be primary sources! Students hone their analytical skills using a house inventory and artifacts from our demonstration collection to reveal evidence about people’s lives in early America.

Program length: 45 Minutes

Reinforces Delaware Standards: History 2; English/Language Arts 2; Visual Arts 4, 5

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USS Constitution.gif
USS CONSTITUTION, Boston, MA, United States

USS Constitution is the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world. It was first launched in 1797. Constitution is one of six ships ordered for construction by George Washington to protect America’s growing maritime interests. The ships greatest glory came during the war of 1812 when she defeated four British frigates which earned her the nickname “Old Ironsides,” because cannon balls glanced off her thick hull. The ship was restored in 1927 with contributions from the nation’s school children.

The Charlestown Navy Yard was built on what was once Mouton’s or Morton’s Point, the landing place of the British army prior to the Battle of Bunker Hill. It was one of the first shipyards built in the United States. During its 174 year history, hundreds of ships were built, repaired and modernized, including the World War II destroyer USS Cassin Young. Today, thirty acres of the Navy Yard are preserved by the National Park Service as part of Boston National Historical Park.

sh

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School Trips

Take a tour of your ship USS CONSTITUTION. You’ll find free, guided tours available to our visitors. Each guided tour, given by several active-duty Navy Sailors, takes you through the ship’s spar deck (top deck), gun deck and berth deck and explains the history of the ship, its crew, and why we still have the ship here today. Guided tours begin every half-hour from 10:00 am to 3:30 pm and last approximately one half-hour each. Each tour group can accommodate up to 80 visitors.

USS CONSTITUTION is a commissioned warship in the U.S. Navy and is not fully equipped to accommodate people with certain disabilities. We ask that any guests requiring additional assistance contact our Events Department prior to their arrival so that we may arrange the best possible tour. The crew of USS CONSTITUTION wants to ensure we make every effort to provide as many guests as possible the opportunity to enjoy and experience the history of our great ship.

Learn the History behind the USS Constitution here

Every Tuesday morning during USS CONSTITUTION’s Summer Hours, the crew of USS CONSTITUTION will be offering the CONSTITUTION EXPERIENCE. Visitors are invited to observe the Morning Colors ceremony (including the firing of USS CONSTITUTION’s Saluting Battery) from Pier One and then board the ship for a special extended tour of duty through the ship’s spaces before being escorted to the USS CONSTITUTION Museum. Group size is limited to 50 visitors. To reserve your spot, please email constitution.events@navy.mil. Visitors participating in the experience must arrive at Pier One by 7:40AM in order to participate.

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United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.jpg
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place Southwest, Washington, DC, United States

A living memorial to the Holocaust, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum inspires citizens and leaders worldwide to confront hatred, prevent genocide, and promote human dignity. Federal support guarantees the Museum’s permanent place on the National Mall, and its far-reaching educational programs and global impact are made possible by generous donors.

In addition to its leadership training programs, the Museum sponsors on-site and traveling exhibitions, educational outreach, Web site, campus outreach and Holocaust commemorations, including the nation’s annual observance in the U.S. Capitol.

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ADMISSION TO THE MUSEUM IS FREE!

GROUPS OF FEWER THAN 40

From September through February, you do not need passes to enter the Permanent Exhibition. From March through August—the Museum’s busy season—passes are required. You may obtain them online in advance for a small service charge or for free in person at the Museum on the day of your visit. The supply of advance and same-day passes is limited and is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

GROUPS OF 40 OR MORE

From September through February, you do not need passes to enter the Permanent Exhibition. From March through August—the Museum’s busy season—passes are required. You may obtain them for free in person at the Museum on the day of your visit if they are available, or you may schedule your visit in advance by using our advance group reservation system.

  • Group reservations are free and may be made as early as 8 p.m. Eastern time six months prior to the date of your visit. The latest you may make a group reservation is 3 p.m. Eastern time one day before your visit. Due to high demand, we strongly encourage groups who wish to visit during spring and summer to complete their reservations well in advance.
  • We will send you an e-mail confirmation at the conclusion of the online reservation process; this e-mail will serve as your timed-entry reservation. Please see Museum Resources to prepare for your group visit to the Permanent Exhibition.
  • Adequate supervision of students and their conduct is essential. We strongly recommend groups provide at least one adult chaperone for every five students under age 18. Chaperones should ensure the proper conduct of students in their group at all times. For further information, please see our Building Regulations (PDF).
  • Groups scheduled to visit the Permanent Exhibition check in and enter at the Raoul Wallenberg Place (15th Street) entrance. Help us prepare your group for entry by forming a single-file line, with a chaperone at both the front and back.

ARRIVAL AND ENTRY

All visitors must pass through security, which includes metal detectors and scanners. Please arrive 15 minutes in advance of your reservation to allow time for this. Given the Museum’s limited storage capacity, we strongly recommended you refrain from bringing your coats and bags with you.

MUSEUM RESOURCES

Please see Museum Resources for guides, activities, and other learning materials designed to help you prepare for your visit.

MAKE YOUR VISIT COMPLETE

After touring the Permanent Exhibition, visit the Museum’s other exhibitions, the Hall of Remembrance, and the Wexner Learning Center.

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The Paul Revere House.jpg
19 North Square, Boston, MA, United States
(617) 523-2338(617) 523-2338
(617) 523-1775

On the night of April 18, 1775, silversmith Paul Revere left his small wooden home in Boston’s North End and set out on a journey that would make him into a legend. Today that home is still standing at 19 North Square and has become a national historic landmark. It is downtown Boston’s oldest building and one of the few remaining from an early era in the history of colonial America.

The home was built about 1680 on the site of the former parsonage of the Second Church of Boston. Increase Mather, the Minister of the Second Church, and his family (including his son, Cotton Mather) occupied this parsonage from 1670 until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1676. A large and fashionable new home was built at the same location about four years later.

Paul Revere owned the home from 1770 to 1800, although he and his family may not have lived here in some periods in the 1780s and 90s. After Revere sold the home in 1800, it soon became a tenement, and the ground floor was remodeled for use as shops, including at various times a candy store, cigar factory, bank and vegetable and fruit business. In 1902, Paul Revere’s great-grandson, John P. Reynolds Jr. purchased the building to ensure that it would not be demolished. Over the next few years, money was raised, and the Paul Revere Memorial Association formed to preserve and renovate the building. In April 1908, the Paul Revere House opened its doors to the public as one of the earliest historic house museums in the U.S. The Association still oversees the preservation and day-to-day operations of this national treasure.

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Paul Revere House for School Group Trips Grades 1 – 12

The Paul Revere House offers interactive educational programs designed to acquaint students with Boston’s long and colorful history. Built in the 1680s for a wealthy merchant, the house became home to silversmith and famous midnight rider Paul Revere during the Revolutionary era. In the 19th century, landlords divided the structure into cramped apartments for immigrant families. Containing remnants of many periods,the house provides a perfect setting in which to explore everyday life from colonial times to the early 20th century.

Reservations

We begin accepting reservations for the current school year the day after Labor Day.

Reservations must be made at least two weeks in advance.

We accept reservation requests by phone(617-523-2338) or by fax. Before contacting the Education Department please fill out a Reservation Request Form (available to download below) to assist you in the planning process. We do not accept reservation requests by email. If you are planning to make a booking for April, May, or June, we encourage you to contact us several months in advance as these are popular times for field trips to the museum. The Paul Revere House also offers Outreach and Distance Learning Programs for School Groups. Please see School Group Trip Programs below to see which programs are available for Distance Learning to your School

Please remember that you do not have a reservation until we have confirmed the arrangements with you by telephone and you have received a written confirmation.

To request a reservation for a Paul Revere House site visit
or program, please use our Reservation Request Form

School Group Trip Programs

Site Visit

For groups walking the Freedom Trail or on a whirlwind tour of Boston,this is the perfect option. Outside the Revere House, a member of the museum staff tells the story of Revere’s ride and presents a brief history of his home. Inside the building, museum staff provide a fascinating glimpse into everyday life for the Revere family, describing the intriguing furnishings and personal artifacts on display. Plenty of time is available for questions. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 30 – 45 minutes
  • Grades: 1st – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 40 people at a time.
  • Larger groups may reserve consecutive times (30 minutes apart).
  • Fee: 75 cents per child 5-17, $2.50 per college student or senior over 62, $3.00 per adult

The Man Behind the Myth

During a short slide presentation, children find out what really happened on Revere’s midnight ride. In small groups, students examine letters, advertisements and reproduction artifacts, looking for clues about the man behind the myth. Intriguing details emerge about Revere’s personality, contributions to the Revolution, large family and many business ventures. An interactive tour of Revere’s house completes the program. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 4th – 7th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130
  • One hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride: Storytelling Program

Find out what really happened during Paul Revere’s midnight ride. Watch a short slide show which separates the facts from the myths surrounding the ride, then retrace Revere’s route from his home in North Square towards the Charles River. Children don hats and carry props as they go,taking on the roles of Paul and Rachel Revere, their children, British soldiers, rowers, Samuel Adams, John Hancock and many others. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 1st – 3rd
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

Walking Tour: Paul Revere’s Boston

Explore the neighborhood where Paul Revere lived and worked. This tour includes stops at the locations of Revere’s silversmith shop and foundry, Boston’swaterfront, Copp’s Hill Cemetery and outside the Old North Church. As they explore the North End, students gather details about Revere’s life by inspecting prints and reproduction artifacts, and discover how Revere used Boston’s geography to his advantage. Price includes a tour of the Revere House and pre-visit materials.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 20 students per tour. Two tours may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130

The Revere Children and the Siege of Boston

After his midnight ride, Paul Revere couldn’t return to Boston. Whatbecame of his family as patriot forces besieged the city, trying toexpel the British troops? Children find out as they take on the roles ofSarah, helping her mother pack to flee the city, and Paul Jr., leftbehind to guard the house against marauding soldiers. Pre-visitmaterials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 6th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

Boston’s North End: The Immigrant Experience

Paul Revere’s North End changed dramatically in the 1800s as Irish,Eastern European and Italian immigrants settled in the colonialdwellings in enormous numbers. At the City of Boston Archaeology Lab,students examine 19th-century personal care items, toys and kitchenutensils excavated at the Revere House. Each artifact providesfascinating clues about the families who lived and worked in the RevereHouse when it was a boarding house.

On a walking tour through the NorthEnd’s twisting streets and alleyways students hear accounts of childrenwho grew up in the nearby tenements, discovering how they helped supporttheir families by working as “newsies,” trooped to the local bath housewith little brothers or sisters in tow, played stickball, and helpedtend rooftop gardens. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students per tour.
  • Two tours may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130

Fun and Games in the 1700s

Introduce young children to life in colonial Boston through games popular in the Reveres’ era. Inside the Revere House, students search for beans, thimbles, a bed wrench and other household items colonial families incorporated into pastimes. Students then try their hands at games such as Snail, Button-Button, Jackstraws, Beast-Fish-Fowl, and Ninepins. Fascinating details emerge about many aspects of daily life. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: PreK-1st
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

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Submarine Force Museum Logo.gif
1 Crystal Lake Road, Groton, CT, United States

Image from the Museum

The Submarine Force Museum, located on the Thames River in Groton, Connecticut, maintains the world’s finest collection of submarine artifacts. It is the only submarine museum operated by the United States Navy, and as such is the primary repository for artifacts, documents and photographs relating to U.S. Submarine Force history. The museum traces the development of the “Silent Service” from David Bushnell’s Turtle, used in the Revolutionary War, to the Ohio and Virginia class submarines.

Originally established as “The Submarine Library” by Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in 1955, the Submarine Force Library and Museum soon gained respect for its archival and research value. In April 1964, the entire collection was donated to the Navy and relocated to the Naval Submarine Base, New London, Groton, Connecticut. The name “Submarine Force Library and Museum” was officially adopted in 1969.

The museum’s collections include more than 33,000 artifacts, 20,000 significant documents and 30,000 photographs. With so many holdings, the displays change frequently and a return visit will be a new experience. The 6,000 volume reference and research library is a world-renowned collection relative to the history of U.S. submarines and is open to anyone looking for information on submarines or submarine history.

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School Group Field Trips

Historic Ship Nautilus and the Submarine Force Museum, located adjacent to the Main Gate of Naval Submarine Base New London, is the Navy’s official submarine museum. The museum’s primary exhibit item is the Historic Ship NAUTILUS. NAUTILUS is the world’s first nuclear-powered submarine and the first ship to go to the North Pole. It is a National Historic Landmark and Connecticut’s State Ship. The submarine is open for visiting by the general public, and is suitable for children of all ages.

The Submarine Force Museum Informational Virtual Tour

The Submarine Force Museum opened in 1986, and contains the nation’s finest collection of submarine material. The exhibits interpret submarine history from Bushnell’s Turtle (used in the Revolutionary War) to today’s modern nuclear-powered vessels. The museum library serves as the repository for the records and history to the U.S. submarine force. New books, photographs, and documents are being added daily. The library is open to researchers on weekdays, except Tuesday’s in the winter only. The museum completed an project in April of 2000, which provides the museum with more exhibit space, a larger gift shop, a 71-seat theatre, a classroom and a new research library.

Historic Ship NAUTILUS Informational Virtual Tour

Aboard NAUTILUS, experience first-hand the thrill of being a submariner as you walk the decks that made Naval history: the world’s first nuclear powered vessel, first ship to go to the North Pole, and first submarine to journey “20,000 Leagues under the sea.” Explore the spaces where the crew of this amazing ship worked, ate, slept, and entertained themselves on their long voyages far beneath the ocean’s waves.

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Sterling Hill Mining Museum.jpg
30 Plant Street, Ogdensburg, NJ, United States

mining artifacts at sterling hill mining museum

Mineralogy & Mining Education

The Sterling Hill Mining Museum is dedicated to educating teachers and their students about natural resource issues, with particular reference to the State of New Jersey.

Our education programs explore such topics as the geology and mineralogy of New Jersey, our nonrenewable resources (metals, nonmetals, and fuels), how those resources have been extracted and used over time, and, in a global sense, how our present lives are shaped by the materials available to us. We work within the broad fields of the STEM core subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), which we often explore not only in their current but also historical contexts.

All of our educational offerings are aligned with New Jersey core curriculum standards and are designed to be implemented by teachers within the context of their existing school curriculum.

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Our Education Programs: An Overview

Watch this Video

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXQuFDB0mSQ%5D

Educational Field Trips & Programs

The Sterling Hill Mining Museum is now in its 15th year of providing inservice programs for teachers of grades 3 – 12. Our educational opportunities include both on-site and off-site teacher workshops, classroom visitations, videoconferences, and educational field trips on topics in science, history, technology, math, and social studies. We provide a full range of on-site opportunities for teachers who wish to bring their classes to us.  In addition, we offer on-site seminars and field training for college and university students, summer institutes with geologists in specialized fields, and cooperative educational events with other organizations.

Museum and Mineralogy Experts

The education director at Sterling Hill, Dr. Earl R. Verbeek, is a research geologist who oversees and implements the museum’s program of geoscience content instruction. Educators on our staff have career experience in geology, mineralogy, hydrology, paleontology, stratigraphy, environmental geology, land-use planning,
resource extraction and land remediation, and historical preservation.

Educational Facilities

Educational field trips and functions at the Sterling Hill Mining Museum take place not in a classroom, but in the buildings and on the grounds of a well-preserved industrial complex and unique geological site.  The entire site is a dynamic interactive classroom that is utilized not only by science teachers, but also by numerous colleges and universities that bring their students to this world-famous locality for direct field experiences unobtainable elsewhere.

How to Participate in Field Trips & Programs

For more information on our education offerings, see the relevant sections of this website: On-site WorkshopsOff-site Contract TrainingClassroom VisitsField Trips, and College-level Instruction.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0GMNZ8zOLQ%5D

To request additional information or to discuss customization of our offerings to better suit your needs, contact Dr. Earl Verbeek at everbeek@ptd.net or by phone at 973-209-7212.

To sign up for a scheduled event, or to receive e-mail notices of upcoming events, contact Jason Winkler at SHMM.Registrar@gmail.com.

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Slater Mill Museum.gif
67 Roosevelt Avenue, Pawtucket, RI, United States

Located on the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Slater Mill is a museum complex dedicated to bringing the American Industrial Revolution to life.

Come and enjoy our tours, exhibits, collections of artifacts, gallery, research library, theatre, gift shop, and more. Slater Mill offers concerts, demonstrations, lectures, meeting spaces for rent, family programs, specialized tours, holiday programs and exhibits of fine crafts and artwork. Along with our on-site programs, we offer an extensive selection of curriculum-based programs for schools and entertaining presentations for social clubs and community groups.

Slater Mill tells the story of innovation, labor, artisans, women’s rights, cotton economy, immigration and assimilation, and industry. It is culturally, educationally and historically important for people of all ages and origins to be able to come, see, touch, learn and be inspired at Slater Mill.

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School Groups Grades 1-12

Slater Mill is the birthplace of modern American industry. As part of their visit, students will be taken through three buildings:

In the Slater Mill, opened in 1793, students will see the original factory floor and machine layout as it was in Mr. Slater’s day. Interpreters will guide students through the history of the industrial revolution, periodically bringing the tour to life with various demonstrations of the still-working factory equipment.

In the Wilkinson Mill, opened in 1810, students will see the machine tool shop used to service Mr. Slater’s original mill. Students will see a working 16,000 pound water wheel in the shop’s wheel pit. Upstairs, our interpreters will explain how the factory transferred power from the Blackstone River into real working machines. Students will see massive gears moving overhead that power the still-functioning drills, lathes, and other machines.

In the 1758 Sylvanus Brown House students will see how a middle class artisan family would have lived in the late 18th century prior to the industrial revolution. Here, interpreters will demonstrate pre-industrial manufactures techniques so students can better understand the true meaning of the factory manufacturing methods they will see in the other buildings.

Students will also visit the nearby Visitor Center, which features a large floor map and a film that lend historical background and modern perspective to the students’ visit.

One travel guide describes their Slater Mill visit: “We were frankly startled by the completeness fo this exceptional visitor attraction…Interpreters have a remarkable amount to show you…There’s nothing quite like this.”

Mister Carl

Jencks Education Center at Slater Mill

Established in memory of Davis Jencks, The Jencks Education Center is Slater Mill’s major initiative to link knowledge of the past with the rich opportunities of modern Pawtucket. The Center hosts a variety of arts and handcraft workshops, educational programs, after school learning opportunities, and business and group events. In conjunction with the Center , the Slater Mill Gallery across Roosevelt Avenue in the Visitor Center exhibits the work of local and national artists and craftspeople. The adjoining gift shop serves as an outlet to purchase their work.

The Jencks Education Center is located on the physically accessible second floor of Slater Mill. The Board of Trustees has made a deliberate choice to honor the historic character of the interior of Slater Mill. With the exception of a bit of paint and floor repair, the Center maintains the building’s historic authenticity. Our architect, Luke Mandle, designed fixtures and furnishings that reflect an industrial feel as opposed to a colonial reproduction style that would confuse visitors and chip away at the true integrity of the mill space.

Education Center

Our Jencks Education Center

The Innovation Room is a gorgeous space with banks of windows overlooking the Blackstone River on three sides. This room serves up to 60 people and has been outfitted with conference/work tables using recycled textile machinery as bases. It is fully wired for technology. The room serves rental needs for retreats, corporate meetings, community programs, the Mill’s own interpretation programs with school children and as a space for workshops with regional and national craftspeople.

The Confluence Room is an extremely inviting library with large, comfortable seating and warm lighting. It also serves as a breakout space for meetings held in the Innovation Room.

Conference Room

Conference Room

The Artifact Access Space use an innovative collection storage method (currently being put into use at the RISD Museum and across the country) called “visible storage” to bring our vast collection to the public. We rotate exhibitions of tools, historical documents, textiles, printing items, early hand machines, and other items so that students, historians, artists and the public can study, read, draw and explore the fantastic collection that was once hidden away in a physically inaccessible third floor archive.

In addition to the in-school curriculum opportunities that Slater Mill currently offers, the Jencks Education Center addresses the need for after school programming, offering various lessons for middle and high school students. We work with urban schools in the surrounding metro areas to provide quality hands-on after school opportunities for a new generation of youth. Our programs include woodworking and textile projects that demonstrate the applied use of science, math, art and communication in a group setting.

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Shelburne Museum Logo.jpg
6000 Shelburne Road, Shelburne, VT, United States

Shelburne Museum is a must visit location for School Groups of all Grades and ages. The museum  offers a unique collection of over 150,000 works including Impressionist paintings, folk art, quilts and textiles, decorative arts, furniture, American paintings, and a dazzling array of 17th-to 20th-century artifacts. The collections are housed in 39 buildings, 25 of which are historic and were relocated to the Museum grounds.

Impressionist paintings, folk art, quilts and textiles, decorative arts, furniture, American paintings, and a dazzling array of 17th-to 20th-century artifacts are on view. Shelburne is home to the finest museum collections of 19th-century American folk art, quilts, 19th- and 20th-century decoys, and carriages.

The Museum’s collections, educational programs for School Groups and teachers, special events, workshops, activities, and special exhibitions constantly offer new perspectives on four centuries of art and material culture, assuring visitors a museum experience unlike any other.

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Shelburne Museum for School groups All Grades

Passport to Learning Shelburne Museum

Pack your bags for an School Group educational adventure at Shelburne Museum!

Passport to Learning is an exciting series of twelve interactive workshops for students in grades K-8 that meet educational standards from Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Grade Expectations and introduce students to concepts and themes in art, language arts, math, science, and social studies through a facilitated exploration of Shelburne Museum.

  • We offer Passport to Learning for School groups each spring and fall.
  • We are currently accepting reservations for School Groups for September 24 through October 12, 2012. Monday, October 1 is reserved exclusively for homeschooling families
  • We can accommodate up to 200 students per day.
  • School Group arrivals are staggered to aid traffic flow through the workshops.Workshops run concurrently from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The last workshop session of the day begins at 1:30 p.m.
  • Workshops begin promptly on the half hour.
  • Each workshop for School Groups closes for a 30-minute break during the day.
  • Workshops run on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • Workshops for School Groups can accommodate between 10 and 20 students at a time. We encourage classrooms to divide into small groups of 4 to 6 students each, with at least one chaperone per group.
  • You may choose to complete as few or as many workshops as you would like. We recommend that students and School Groups in grades K-2 attend 2-3 workshops and students in grades 3-8 attend 3-5 workshops in a visit.
  • Every student receives a passport upon arrival. At the completion of a workshop each student receives a stamp in his or her passport.
  • Every student receives a pass to return to the Museum for free with one paid adult.

COST

Passport to Learning costs $5 per student and $5 per chaperone. School staff or one parent per home-schooled family are admitted free.

REGISTRATION

To register your classroom or your homeschooling family for Passport to Learning, please use our online registration form to register

Passport School Group WorkShops

Passport to Learning Shelburne Museum 2

The Great Rocket Race

Can you predict the factors that will make the most successful rocket? Explore the temporary exhibit “Time Machines: Robots, Rockets, and Steampunk,” then launch several rockets to see which flies the highest. This workshop begins at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 12 p.m., and 1 p.m. and lasts approximately 50 minutes.

  • Webb Gallery
  • 10
  • 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 12 p.m., 1 p.m.
  • 9-10 a.m.
  • Suitable for School Group grades K-8.
  • Recommended for School Group grades 3-8.
  • Extension activities are forthcoming.

Drama in the Tavern

Participants learn about life in 1820s Vermont while role playing to solve the mystery of the hidden apprentice and the horse thief.

 

Hitchin’ a Ride

Students investigate 19th-century modes of transportation and compare them to contemporary means of travel.

Kraken Up

Acquaint yourself with the creatures of the deep sea through visual art and poetry.

Let’s Play!

Participants enjoy children’s pastimes from times past. Find out how they compare to today’s toys and games.

Settling In

Children gain insight into life in the late 18th century while exploring the Settlers’ House and Barn and participating in daily household activities.

  • Settlers’ House
  • 15
  • 12-12:30 p.m.
  • Suitable for School Group grades K-8.
  • Recommended for School Group grades K-8.

Download extension activities for this workshop.

Shop ‘til You Drop

Children “purchase” and “sell” goods through a combination of bartering, paying with cash, and using credit.

  • General Store
  • 15
  • 12:30-1 p.m.
  • Suitable for School group grades K-8.
  • Recommended for School Group grades 2-6.

Download extension activities for this workshop.

Sign of the Times

Discover the symbolism of trade signs. Can you figure out which sign goes with which trade? Do the trades of the 18th and 19th centuries exist today?

  • Stagecoach Inn
  • 15
  • 10:30-11 a.m.
  • Suitable for School Group grades K-8.
  • Recommended for School Group grades 1-5.

Download extension activities for this workshop.

Train Tracking

Students investigate communication methods that kept 19th and 20th-century railroads running smoothly and safely and try sending messages by Morse code.

Who’s for Lunch?

Students gain an understanding of the interdependence of a food chain by playing a Web of Life game. Participants also become familiar with the goals of wildlife conservation.

  • Beach Lodge
  • 20
  • 11-11:30 a.m.
  • Suitable for School Group grades K-8.
  • Recommended for School group grades K-5.

Download extension activities for this workshop.

You Be the Judge

Using examples of actual petty crimes committed in Vermont in the early 20th century, students decide who should stand trial and who should go without punishment.

 Self Guided Visits

Passport to Learning Shelburne Museum 4

Groups from high schools, colleges, summer camps, or other organizations may opt for a self-guided visit to Shelburne Museum. Self-guided visits allow your group to explore the Museum at your own pace and visit the exhibits and buildings that are of the most interest to your group.

We are now accepting reservations for self-guided visits during the 2012 season. Entry to the Museum is permitted as early as 10 a.m. for self-guided visits.

Admission for students in grades K-12 is $5 per student and parent chaperone. School or organization faculty and staff are admitted free.

Admission for college or other adult education groups is $10 per person. School or organization faculty and staff are admitted free.

Reservations are required for group rates. Please contact Hannah Weisman, academic programs coordinator, at (802) 985-3346 x3395 or schoolprograms@shelburnemuseum.org to make a reservation.

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Saratogo Automobile Museum Logo.jpg
110 Avenue of the Pines, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States

Saratoga Automobile Museum

Welcome to the Saratoga Automobile Museum where we preserve, interpret and exhibit automobiles and automotive artifacts. We celebrate the automobile and educate the general public, students and enthusiasts regarding the role of the automobile in New York State and in the wider world. In addition to technical and design aspects, our educational focus is on the past, present and future social and economic impact of the automobile.

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Saratoga Automobile Museum

Field Trips

Grade/age level specific field trips have been designed to engage and educate all students.  Each program begins with an introduction to our Museum and the history of the automobile in New York State, followed by a guided tour of each exhibit.  Programs conclude with a “Traffic Safety” music and craft project (for pre-k and elementary students) and a “New York State Auto Archaeology” scavenger hunt for middle-high school students.
*Each student will receive a gift bag from the museum containing practical, fun and informational materials.
Cost: $5.00 per student (Chaperones are free).

SAM’s Garage

SAM’s Garage is a place where children learn about cars while gearing up for life.

Programs at SAM’s Garage encourage non-traditional, multigenerational learning opportunities for underserved children utilizing historic automobiles. The goal is to help students increase their understanding and proficiency in math, science and history, while helping them to improve their desire to stay in school, develop strong leadership skills and healthy community relationships. Previous projects include the restoration of the iconic Ford Model TT Popcorn Wagon seen at many of the Museum’s summer auto and lawn shows, and a Model A Huckster built from scratch.

The Museum has also served as a host for the Pinewood Derby with local Cub Scouts, provides an education area inside the museum where students can learn about cars and racing and during the Holidays, welcomed Santa Claus to its garage.

The mission of the Saratoga Automobile Museum is to preserve, interpret and exhibit automobiles and automotive artifacts.

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Ritz Theater and Museum.jpg
829 North Davis Street, Jacksonville, FL, United States

Building on the community’s proud heritage, the Ritz is truly a Special Place, where history’s missing chapters are being restored, where talent is nurtured and creativity is celebrated.  It is a community gathering place where ideas are exchanged, information is disseminated and a roadmap for the future is developed.

Whether visiting the museum, attending a concert, viewing a film or listening to a lecture, the Ritz has a special energy that leaves you with a special feeling. There is always an exhibition, music, dance or the dramatic arts inside the Ritz that will enthrall, educate and entertain.

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YOU’RE INVITED TO VISIT THE RITZ THEATRE & MUSEUM!

Our permanent museum collection presents the history of Northeast Florida’s African American community, featuring a walk through old LaVilla and a dynamic multi-media display highlighting brothers James Weldon Johnson and John Rosamond Johnson, Jacksonville native sons and composers of “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing.”

The Museum Gallery showcases a variety of changing art exhibits throughout the year.

DOCENT GUIDED TOUR GROUPS

Guided tours are led by trained docents who will provide information about the exhibits featured in the museum.

STUDENT GROUPS

We require one chaperone for every ten students; chaperones admitted free.

SELF-GUIDED TOURS

Individuals and small groups can visit the museum without a guide at the discretion of museum staff.

SCHEDULING A GUIDED TOUR

To schedule a guided tour, please call (904) 632-5555 ext. 228 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. weekdays. The following information is needed: school or group name, address and telephone number; contact person’s name; preferred tour date and time; grade level and number of students and chaperones.  The museum can accommodate 50 guests at one time.  This number includes chaperones accompanying student groups.  YOU MUST RECEIVE A WRITTEN CONFIRMATION OF YOUR DATE BEFORE YOU ARRIVE.  Please notify the Ritz Theatre & Museum of any cancellations at least 48 hours (2 days) prior to the tour date.  Tours may be rescheduled if space is available.  PLEASE BE PUNCTUAL AS THE MUSEUM TOUR SCHEDULE IS VERY BUSY.  LATE ARRIVAL MAY RESULT IN CANCELLATION.  THE MUSEUM CANNOT ACCOMMODATE GROUPS OF UNSCHEDULED VISITORS.

ENTRANCE FEES:

(EXCEPT FOR SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS)

Adults (18-64) $8.00; Children (4-17) $5.00; Senior Citizens (65 and older) $5.00; Children (3 and under free)

GROUP RATES:

– Groups of 25 or more

Adults (18-64) – $7.00, Children (4-17) – $3.00, Seniors (65+) – $3.00

Payments can be made in advance or at the time of your tour.  Cash, cashier’s check or money orders payable to the Ritz Theatre & Museum -COJ.  Credit/debit card payment accepted.  Identification must match the name on the card.   Personal checks accepted with government issued identification.

Click Here to schedule a guided tour

PARKING:

After unloading visitors at the main entrance, buses should proceed to the church parking lot on Davis Street across the street from the theatre.  VISITORS MUST BE DROPPED OFF IN THE PARKING LOT AT THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO ENSURE GUEST SAFETY.

MUSEUM MANNERS

The Ritz Theatre & Museum is a repository of many rare and priceless collections.  Objects from our collections and from other museums are on display in the gallery and the permanent exhibit of our museum.  The following rules are for the safety and security of these objects and our visitors:

  •  NO STILL OR MOVING PICTURES ARE TO BE TAKEN IN THE MUSEUM.
  •  NO CELL PHONE, PICTURE CELL PHONE OR iPOD USAGE ALLOWED.
  •  NO FOOD, DRINKS OR CHEWING GUM.
  •  NO RUNNING, LOUD TALKING OR RECKLESS BEHAVIOR.
  •  NO HANDLING OF OBJECTS.
  •  NO BACKPACKS

Arrive 10 minutes before your scheduled tour to allow time for unloading and restroom break.

Do not bring more than the scheduled number of visitors.

Bring a minimum of one chaperone per 10 children.

Provide a name tag for each student.

Chaperones should:

 Supervise their groups and maintain order.  Chaperones are responsible for the good behavior and discipline of students.  Uncontrollable students will be asked to leave the museum.

 Stay with their students at all times including restroom visits and help students move quietly through the museum

 Assist in providing a positive learning experience.

During the museum visit, docents will guide students through specific standards based activities.

Following the museum visit, teachers may coordinate optional post-museum activities through the downtown Jacksonville Public Library.

Each museum field trip is approximately 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Maximum group size is 60 students.

The Museum fee is $3.00 per student. Transportation is the responsibility of the teacher.

Contact Adonnica Toler, museum assistant, to schedule a field trip, 904-632-5555 or atoler@coj.net.

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Railroaders Memorial Museum.png
1300 9th Avenue, Altoona, PA, United States

Field Trips

The Railroaders Memorial Museum is dedicated to revealing, interpreting, commemorating and celebrating the significant contributions of Railroaders and their families to American life and industry.

Generations of Railroaders can trace the roots of their heritage at The Altoona Railroad Museum. Known as the only interactive Railroaders Museum in America! Visitors will experience Pennsylvania Railroad History through sights and sounds that will bring your group or family back into an historic era.

For more than a century Altoona was one of the most important rail facilities in the United States. The city was home to the Altoona Pennsylvania Railroad’s repair and maintenance shops, its locomotive construction facility, and its test department. Altoona’s location at the foot of the Allegheny front and its proximity to the Horseshoe Curve route over the mountains made the city a key location in the Altoona Pennsylvania Railroad’s operations.

World Famous Horseshoe Curve

Take a most beautiful drive through the Allegheny Mountains. Experience the challenge the Pennsylvania Railroad workers overcame by completing rail tracks through this rough terrain.
Once you have arrived at the Horseshoe Curve, enjoy one of the World’s most incredible engineering feats. Ride the Funicular or walk 194 beautiful landscaped steps to the tracks for a front seat view of a train mans’ wonder. You will also find the Horseshoe Curve to be a relaxing and entertaining place to enjoy a picnic lunch.

While visiting, be sure to stop by the Visitors Center to view the descriptive displays that will help you better appreciate the work involved in building such a marvel. The Visitors Center also houses a gift shop of souvenirs for every railroad buff – from books to hats and sweatshirts.

The “Funicular”

The “Funicular” is an incline plane designed to take you from the visitors center at Horseshoe Curve Historic Landmark up to the train tracks of Horseshoe Curve. Or if you prefer a nature walk, you may take the beautifully scenic steps to the top.

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All Aboard!

Come and experience the Railroaders Memorial Museum and Horseshoe Curve National Historic Landmark and learn about the Pennsylvania Railroad in its glory days and why it was so important to our region.

The Railroaders Memorial Museum offers free field trips to all school aged children grades K-12.  Bus drivers and teachers are admitted free too.  Parents and chaperones are admitted at our discounted group rate of $9.36 per person for Museum and Horeshoe Curve admittance.  The Horeshoe Curve only rate is $5.20 for each parent or chaperone.

The Railroaders Memorial Museum offers 3 full floors of exhibits, a move theatre that shows 2 movies every hour, a room where your group can eat their lunch inside or venture outside and eat at our picnic tables.  We also feature a fully stocked gift shop.

The Horseshoe Curve National Historic Landmark features a short film about the history of the Curve, an incline that will take your group “track side” so you can watch the trains travel around the Curve and the DeGol pavilion where your group can have a picnic lunch.

To schedule a field trip please email mstrohm@railroadcity.com or call Maria at 814-946-0834 ext. 201. Call today, dates are filling up fast!

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Portland Museum of Art Logo.jpg
7 Congress Street, Portland, ME, United States

The Portland Museum of Art, founded in 1882, is Maine’s oldest and largest public art institution. The Museum’s architecturally significant buildings unite three centuries that showcase the history of American art and culture. The Museum’s collection of more than 17,000 objects includes decorative and fine arts dating from the 18th century to the present. The heart of the Museum’s collection is the State of Maine Collection, which features works by artists such as Winslow Homer, Marsden Hartley, Rockwell Kent, John Marin, Louise Nevelson, and Andrew Wyeth. The Museum has the largest European art collection in Maine. The major European movements from Impressionism through Surrealism are represented by the Joan Whitney Payson, Albert Otten, and the Isabelle and Scott Black Collection, which include works by Mary Cassatt, Edgar Degas, René Magritte, Claude Monet, Edvard Munch, Pablo Picasso, and Auguste Rodin. The Elizabeth B. Noyce Collection, a bequest of 66 paintings and sculptures, has transformed the scope and quality of the Museum’s American collection, bringing to the Museum its first paintings by George Bellows, Alfred Thompson Bricher, and Jamie Wyeth, and adding masterpieces to the collection by Childe Hassam, Fitz Henry Lane, and N. C. Wyeth. In addition to exhibitions, the Museum has constantly changing educational programs, family festivals, lectures, art classes, musical concerts, bookgroups, art camps, gallery talks, and much more.

The Museum’s collection is housed in three architecturally significant buildings

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PMA School Tours
The Portland Museum of Art offers FREE admission for K-12 school tours!

Free School Tours are made possible by the Margaret E. Burnham Charitable Trust.

  • Portland Public Schools receive free school tour admission through Culture Club-Portland, a collaborative program between the Portland Museum of Art, Portland Symphony Orchestra, Portland Stage Company, and Portland Ovations. Portland teachers, please follow the tour procedures below to schedule your free Culture Club/PMA School Tour.

Complete the Tour Request Form to begin booking your PMA Free School Tour today! Please note, tours are not confirmed until you have received follow-up communication from the Department of Learning and Interpretation.

Free School Tours at the Portland Museum of Art are interactive, engaging trips for K-12 students centered on the experience of looking at original works of art. Through dynamic conversations and inquiry, as well as sketching and writing activities, students understand the creative process, develop critical thinking skills, and connect art to their own world. Led by experienced docent educators, PMA School Tours inspire learning, connect to the classroom curriculum, and are aligned with the Maine Learning Results. We welcome all school groups and offer a range of programs to meet your students’ needs.

How to schedule a PMA school tour at the Portland Museum of Art

1. Choose your theme.
Focus Tours are thematic tours that align with the school curriculum, encourage interactive dialogue and inquiry-based learning, and include sketching and writing activities that connect students with their own creativity. Focus Tours are aligned with the Maine Learning Results.

  • Art Safari
    Track creatures—wild and tame—on this fun adventure for young children.
  • Let’s Face It!
    Explore how ideas of self, identity, and community are expressed through painted and sculpted portraits.
  • A Look Inside the McLellan House
    Discover Maine and Portland’s past by experiencing the splendor of an 1801 mansion.
  • Sculpture All Around
    Investigate the materials, techniques, and subjects of three-dimensional and relief sculpture.
  • Land, Sea, and Sky
    Travel through the Maine landscape on this tour that explores how nature inspires artists.
  • It’s Elemental
    Learn how artists use line, shape, color, form, texture, and space to create works of art.
  • Schedule of changing exhibitions.

2. Choose your date and time.

  • Guided PMA School Tours are available with THREE weeks advanced notice and can accommodate up to 60 students per tour hour.
  • Tours are available Tuesday through Friday, and Monday between Memorial Day and Columbus Day, at 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
  • Tours for high school groups are also available at noon and 1:00 p.m.
  • Please note that unscheduled groups may not be admitted to the museum if their visit conflicts with already-scheduled tours. Admission fees are not waived for unscheduled school groups.

To begin the scheduling process, please complete the Tour Request Form. Please note, tours are not confirmed until you have received follow-up communication from the Department of Learning and Interpretation.

3. Follow these guidelines for a successful visit.

Before your visit:

  • Please make sure that your students know and understand the Museum Rules (see below).
  • One chaperone for every 10 students is required. We are unable to accommodate more than one adult for every five students.
  • Please inform chaperones of their responsibilities before the tour begins and familiarize them with the Museum Rules. Chaperones are required to know their students, keep their groups together, and help maintain discipline. Chaperones should not bring younger children on this visit.
  • Please note that the museum does not have space for students to eat.

Getting to the PMA:

  • Allow enough time for travel and parking. Early or late arrivals will disrupt other groups and the museum cannot guarantee extended tours to accommodate late arrivals.
  • Buses may park for free on West Commercial Street.

On your tour:

  • Please have students arrive wearing nametags.
  • Please divide students into groups of 10 before arriving at the museum. Students will exit the bus in their groups with their chaperones.
  • Molly Braswell, Department of Learning and Interpretation Assistant, will greet your students on the bus and will review the Museum Rules.
  • Students will leave jackets and any other materials on the bus (including notebooks and pencils). All materials required for the tour activities will be provided by the museum.
  • Guided tours last about one hour. Restroom breaks and visits to the PMA Store will impact the length of your guided tour. Additional out-of-tour activities will take place after the guided tour and will require you to schedule extra time and to bring extra chaperones.
  • The PMA has a Photography Policy. Students are not allowed to take pictures during the guided tour, but may follow the Photography Policy after the guided tour.
  • Students are welcome in the PMA Store in groups of 10 or fewer when accompanied by a chaperone. Visits to the PMA Store take place after the guided tour is complete.
  • Please no cell phones during the guided tour.
  • Encourage students to use their free “Member for a Moment” coupons with their families!

4. Please review the Museum Rules with your students.

The museum’s common sense rules are designed to keep the artwork and visitors safe.

  • Please do not touch! This is the most important rule to remember in the museum. It applies to paintings, frames, sculptures, stands, glass cases, labels, and walls. This is how we preserve art and keep it safe from damage.
  • Stay back 18 inches or more from the works of art and the walls. This is how we avoid accidental damage to art and people.
  • Be careful around the balconies. Enjoy the view, but do not jump up or lean on the balconies and do not place anything on the edge that could fall.
  • Write with a pencil only and use a notebook or clipboard to lean on. We will loan clipboards to you, but we will ask you not to use pens in the galleries.
  • Walk, don’t run, in the museum.
  • Please speak quietly as sound carries in the museum. This is especially important in the Great Hall when you are entering and leaving the museum.
  • Do not bring food, drink, candy, gum, or backpacks into the galleries. You may leave your coats and other belongings in the bins provided or in the coatroom.

FREE K-12 Teacher-led School Tours

  • The museum strongly encourages guided tours for K-12 audiences. The tours are designed to align with the school curriculum, encourage interactive dialogue and inquiry-based learning, and include sketching and writing activities that connect students with their own creativity. Students gain more from the museum experience and learn more about art when they are able to interact with docents and their peers.
  • If you wish to develop and lead your students’ tour, you may schedule a teacher-led visit. Lesson plans and other resources to help you plan your tour can be found at portlandmuseum.org/teachers
  • Teacher-led tours must be scheduled three weeks in advance and you must follow the guidelines and Museum Rules listed above.
  • Teacher-led tours require additional chaperones:
    • Grades K through 5 = one chaperone for every 5 students
    • Grades 6 thorough 8 = one chaperone for every 7 students
    • Grades 9 through 12 = one chaperone for every 10 students
  • Students on teacher-led tours must stay in their groups with their chaperones, and only pencils are allowed in the museum galleries.

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Plimoth Plantation.jpg
137 Warren Avenue, Plymouth, MA, United States

School Groups Field Trips at Plimoth Plantation offer a fascinating and personal look at the lives of the Native Wampanoag People and the Pilgrims, the English who lived in early Plymouth Colony. In addition to a self-guided Museum tour, School groups have a number of options for tailoring their visit. School Groups with a specific interest, such as early gardens, period cookery, colonial religion, Native culture, timber-frame construction, or navigation, may book a speaker through our Professional Speakers Bureau or a Guided Tour.

Our historical theme dining turns what might otherwise be just another restaurant meal into a memorable (and tasty!) addition to your visit for you School Field Trips. We offer themed meals with Pilgrim and or Native hosts, and lunch or dinner with food historians who will teach your School groups just how Miles Standish ate his dinner without a fork. For more about historical or modern-day dining opportunities, go to our School Groups Dining page.

Student School groups also have a variety of choices to expand their stay, including Wampanoag School field trip enhancements, hands-on workshops, historical dining programs and overnight programs. We would be happy to combine any of these to create a package suitable to your needs. For more about our student school groups programs, go to our Education Programs section.

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School Groups Field Trips

Let Plimoth Plantation help you expand the walls of your classroom and inspire in your students a curiosity about and understanding of the past. Whether you bring your students to the museum or have us come to you, we will spark your students’ imaginations and make history come alive.

There’s a reason why Plimoth Plantation is one of the most popular field trip destinations in New England!  At Mayflower II, The 17th-Century English Village, and the Wampanoag Homesite, students are surrounded by the sights, smells and sounds of the 17th century. Visits to the Museum are a great way to spark the imagination of your students and help to make history come alive!

There are a variety of ways you can use our unique living history resources.

Plimoth Plantation Field Trips

Visits to the Museum immerse your students in the 17th-century world of the Wampanoag and Pilgrims. For more information on booking a field trip, visit our reservations page. Information on grant funding for field trips may be found at Foundations for Kids.  

Special Programs 

While you’re at the Museum, why not arrange for a special hands-on workshopguided tour or special meal? You can even plan an overnight stay! Learn more on our School Programs page.

We Can Visit You

Can’t make it to the Museum? We’ll bring the Museum to you! Our Pilgrims and Native museum teachers will go from class to class, for informative and fun hour-long classroom programs or traveling workshops.

Invite Plimoth Plantation to your school or group meeting.

School Classroom Visits

Our talented Pilgrim role players and Native museum teachers can bring the magic of Plimoth Plantation to your classroom; wherever you are. Their visits are a great way to prepare for a field trip and are a wonderful option for those who can’t make it to the museum.

For more information on inviting Plimoth Plantation to visit you, please go to We Can Visit You!

Speakers

Invite one of Plimoth Plantation’s captivating Pilgrim role players, Native speakers or historians to your next group meeting or function. Find out how at Professional Speakers.

School Groups Field Trips Planning Information

Admission discounts are available for School groups of 15 or more ages six and up.

Admission includes a self guided visit to the museum’s sites and exhibits.

If you need rate information for your school groups field trip or tour group, please call the group sales office at 508-746-1622, ext. 8358 during regular business hours (9am to 5pm Monday – Friday), or e-mail groupsales@plimoth.org.

Plimoth Plantation is a popular destination for adult and student tour school groups. Book early for the best times. Discounted rates apply for school groups of 15 or more people. Plimoth Plantation offers discounted rates for different types of groups. Please contact the Group Sales Office at 508-746-1622, ext 8358, or grouptours@plimoth.org for more information about rates.

To assist you in planning your visit, we recommend you allocate 3 hours at Plimoth Plantation and 1 hour at Mayflower II. Travel time between the two sites is approximately 15 minutes.

All school group field trips visits are self-guided tours of the Museum sites. Guided Tours are available on request for an additional fee.

Group Sales Office hours are 9 am – 5 pm, Monday – Friday. The office is closed weekends and holidays.

If our phone lines are busy, you may place your reservation request online. A confirmation will be emailed within one business day.

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Phildelphia Museum of Art Logo.jpg
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA, United States

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is among the largest museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 227,000 works of art and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Its facilities include its landmark Main Building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the Perelman Building, located nearby on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum on the 2200 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and two 18th-century houses in Fairmount Park, Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove. The Museum offers a wide variety of activities for public audiences, including special exhibitions, programs for children and families, lectures, concerts and films.

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School Group Programs

The Division of Education of the Philadelphia Museum of Art relates, through interpretation, the Museum’s collections and its commitment to their preservation, study and display, to the needs and interests of a diverse audience. The department has developed nationally and internationally recognized programs for children, families, teachers, adult learners, and special audiences alike.

Each year, approximately 75,000 students participate in Philadelphia Museum of Art programs meant to enliven their understanding of and responses to works of art. The goal of the Museum is to guide students toward a deeper and richer interpretation of the visual arts, by fostering their critical thinking and viewing skills, and by helping them to see how works of art relate to both their school curriculum and their life experiences.

Registration begins in September of each year. Register early as programs fill quickly; a minimum of two weeks notice is required when making your appointment. Appointments may be made by phone at 215-684-7580 Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. and 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Arranging Your Visit  ●  Before, During & After Activities  ●  Online Visit Request

Tours & Programs

Learn the about the many ways to connect art and the classroom with a variety of workshops, programs, and resources designed especially for teachers.

Tours of Exhibitions

School tours of select exhibitions at the Museum allow students a unique opportunity to experience works of art only on view for a limited time.

Distance Learning

Before, after, or even instead of a Museum tour, visit us from your classroom! Our award-winning Distance Learning virtual fieldtrips provide meaningful, interactive learning experiences, ideal for the 21st-century classroom. Using videoconferencing technology, we bring the Museum to you as a stand-alone lesson or in conjunction with a Museum visit. Our lessons are designed to fit seamlessly into almost any area of classroom curricula.

Wachovia Education Resource Center

Equipped as a high-tech research site and resource lending library, this center will house materials to help make cross-curricular connections: from online research sites, art-reference texts, and exhibition catalogs to teaching materials prepared by the Museum’s Education staff.

Distance Learning

Before, after, or even instead of a Museum tour, visit us from your classroom! Our award-winning Distance Learning virtual lessons provide engaging, highly interactive learning experiences, ideal for the 21st-century classroom. Using videoconferencing technology, we bring the Museum to you as a stand-alone lesson or in conjunction with an on-site Museum visit. Our lessons are designed to fit seamlessly into almost any area of classroom curricula and all lessons are aligned with Pennsylvania and Common Core state standards.

Correlations between Museum lessons and Academic Standards:
Pennsylvania State Standards | NJ State Standards | Common Core State Standards

For more information, please contact Distance Learning by phone at (215) 684-7333, by fax at (215) 236-4063, or by e-mail at distancelearning@philamuseum.org.

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PennyPacker Mills Civil War Reanactment.jpg
5 Haldeman Road, Schwenksville, PA 19473, United States

Serene country estate landscaped by Thomas Meehan & Sons to highlight the Colonial Revival mansion and surrounding farmland of 170 acres. Originally constructed about 1720, the mansion was redesigned and enlarged by architect Arthur Brockie in 1901 to enhance a country gentleman’s lifestyle. Fully furnished with antiques collected by former Pennsylvania Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker reflecting his interests in early Pennsylvania history, German and Dutch settlers, native Americans, the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. The collection also includes Governor Pennypacker’s political (1903 – 1907), genealogical and personal papers. Research by appointment.  Scope of Collections

Activities throughout the year include exhibits, nature walks, workshops, and special events.  Picnic facilities available. Large group and school tours are requested to call in advance to schedule visits. First floor of mansion and restrooms are handicap accessible.

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School and Camp Groups All Ages & Grades

The Experience

A tour of this colonial-revival mansion brings back early 20th-century middle-class living, but harkens to America’s glorious colonial past. Oil portraits, redware, scenic wallpaper and family antiques are mindful of the colonial era, but incorporated into an updated 1900 home.

Rooms harbor exquisite Victorian accoutrements, including children’s toys, and many facets of Pennsylvania history. The sprawling country estate is adjacent to the Perkiomen Creek with a landscape designed by Thomas Meehan & Sons in 1901.

History

Farming and milling became a way of life here for the original landowner Hans Jost Heijt in the early 1700s. Ancestors of Pennsylvania Governor Samuel Pennypacker bought the property in 1747 and owned it when Gen. Washington used Pennypacker Mills as headquarters in 1777. By 1903 Gov. Pennypacker, his wife Virginia and their children, used it as their summer home.

Originally constructed about 1720, the mansion at Pennypacker Mills was redesigned and enlarged by architect Arthur Brockie in 1901.

Ongoing Demonstrations, Activities and Shopping Opportunites

Civilian Street
Experience bread  baking, hair fashion, children’s  dolls, phrenology, children’s clothing, & cooking. Also, visit the
military engineers  and learn about map making & surveying.

Military Camps
Visitors are welcome to visit  both Confederate & Union camps where they can inspect the camps, food preparation, meet soldiers & learn about life in the Infantry.

Musicians
Saturday, see  Matthew Dodd throughout the  day on the Mansion Porch. Later in the day, stay after the battle for a early evening concert with the Irish Band of the PA 69th!

Artillery
Stop by both Artillery camps to learn about the cannons, roles of the crew, and ammunition. It’s a blast!
Sutlers
Our merchants sell a wide variety of Civil War Era merchandise from fabric & sewing needs, military & civilian clothing, and wooden toys & furniture.

Mansion Tours
Throughout the weekend tour the decorated mansion of Samuel Pennypacker and his family & visit the new exhibit
in the Galleries.

Museum Shop
Purchase old fashioned toys, period inspired gifts, and books. Buy your copy of Six Weeks in Uniform, Governor Pennypacker’s account of his experience in the Pennsylvania militia .

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New Hampshire Farmers Museum.jpg
1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton, NH, United States

The New Hampshire Farm Museum is a non-profit 501 c3 educational organization dedicated to preserving, promoting and carrying forward New Hampshire’s rural and agricultural heritage. The New Hampshire Farm Museum consists of two adjoining farmsteads situated on 50 acres located on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, New Hampshire. The historic Jones Farm and the Plummer Homestead are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and were passed down in the same families for two centuries. The Museum operates a working farm growing heirloom varieties of vegetables for our Community Supported Agriculture Program and for sale in our Country store. We raise hens for eggs and keep a small selection of heritage breed farm animals to support our educational efforts. We have displays of agricultural implements and educational exhibits on rural life and agriculture for the visiting public and our many visiting school children. We offer guided tours of the historic Jones farmhouse as well as farm animal tours. Special events and programs, workshops, and day camps are offered throughout the year.

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Planning Your Group Visit

School, homeschools, scouting or camp groups are all welcome at the New Hampshire Farm Museum We need a minimum of 10 children or $60. to run a program. The museum accepts school and youth group visits from May 1st through December. Visits can be scheduled Tuesday through Friday 9:00 am to 4:00 pm depending on the program.

To Schedule Your Visit : Please call 603-652-7840 or email: info@farmmuseum.org.

We recommend one chaperon per ten students. Chaperons or home school parents are charged at half the student rate. There is no charge for teachers, group leaders, counselors or bus drivers or children ages 3 and under. In good weather students can pack a lunch to eat in our picnic area. We have an outdoor handicapped accessible restroom/port-a-potty. We can show students historic games like hoop rolling and graces for all to play with during lunch. We welcome students to shop in our Country Store if permitted during lunch break. The store contains many inexpensive items, educational toys, juice and soda, penny candy and farm grown produce and eggs.

School and Youth Programs at the NH Farm Museum

The New Hampshire Farm Museum provides a wonderful, hands-on opportunity for your students to explore New Hampshire’s agricultural heritage and see where farming and technology intersect with New Hampshire history.  Students who visit the museum have the opportunity to tour a working organic farm and learn about agricultural practices such as the “three sisters”, a method of co-planting corn, beans, and squash that the European settlers learned from the Native Americans. In addition to being a working farm, the museum is home to a vast collection of historic agricultural implements and artifacts of rural life including Daniel Webster’s plow and Horace Greeley’s privy and two historic farmhouses. No visit is complete without a chance to interact with the heritage breed farm animals!

Any of the following educational programs offered by the museum can be easily adapted to fit your curriculum and meet your class’s specific needs.

The Ox-Cart Man: Farms & Families at Work 

Program recommended for grades k-3. Offered May-mid-November. Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum, Approx. 3 hours

In this hands-on program based on NH poet Donald Hall’s story, The Ox-Cart Man, children explore the way families lived and worked in the past throughout rural New England. The students tour the 18th-century farmhouse cape and learn about the roles of each member of the household and how each was needed to make the family’s living. In gathering farm products to bring to market, they learn about the artifacts and objects of daily life in Colonial times. On their hunt through the barn they search for many of the farm objects depicted in the story and learn about barter and trade. Students make butter, meet our sheep, chickens, turkeys and pig, work with wool, try a planting or harvesting activity and help pack the ox-cart for the trip to Portsmouth.

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: Rural Life & Technological/Agricultural Evolution 

Program recommended for students grades 3-8. Offered May-mid-November Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum. Approx. 3 hours

The Jones Farmstead consists of a set of connected farm buildings referred to in an old children’s rhyme as, “Big House, little house, back house, barn.” Each piece of this connected farm structure tells a different story about New Hampshire history from Colonial times to the Twentieth century. In this hands-on program students learn about rural life and technological and agricultural change in New England as they tour the historic farmhouse, hunt for artifacts in the barn, and participate in farm chores. Students will view “Hands to Work,” a short film which uses oral histories and historic photographs of New Hampshire farming. They will try farm chores like grinding corn, carrying water with a yoke, and doing the wash. They will visit the farm animals and make butter. This program can be used supplement lessons on the transition from farms to factories as part of economic evolution or adapted to fit a range of other learning goals.

Hands to Work Program for Pre-schoolers

Program recommended for children ages 3-5 yrs. Offered May through mid-November. Cost: $5 per child. 10 student minimum- maximum: 25. Approx. 2 hours.

Children will learn all about the work on the farm and how the children helped in this completely hands-on program for pre-schoolers. They will grind the corn to feed the chickens, do the wash with washtub and wringer, pump the water at the well, feel the wool from the sheep, churn the cream to make butter, plant a seed or harvest the vegetables depending on the season and explore the Big Yellow Barn to hunt for fun things related to the farm.

An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving on the Farm 

Program recommended for children grades K – 5. Offered November 1st through November 20th. Cost: $7 per child 10 student minimum- maximum 45. Approx. 2 ½ hours.

New Hampshire has a special connection to Thanksgiving as it was our own Sarah Josepha Hale who persuaded President Lincoln in 1863 to declare it a National Holiday. Students will enjoy a tour through the historic farmhouse with costumed roleplayers portraying the Civil War Era. Then they will learn to grind and pound flint corn to make our cornbread and to churn cream into butter for our bread and press apples to make cider for us to drink. We will also explore the 104 ft. long great barn on a special barn hunt and visit with our heritage breed turkeys and other farm animals.

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Museum of Tolerance New York.jpg
226 East 42nd Street, New York, NY, United States

The MOTNY, located in the heart of Manhattan in New York City, challenges visitors to confront bigotry and racism, and to understand the Holocaust in both historic and contemporary contexts. Through interactive workshops, exhibits, and videos, individuals explore issues of prejudice, diversity, tolerance, and cooperation in the workplace, in schools and in the community.

The Museum of Tolerance New York (MOTNY) is part of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, an international Jewish human rights organization dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust by fostering tolerance and understanding through community involvement, educational outreach and social action. The MOTNY is a multimedia educational museum located on East 42nd Street in the heart of Manhattan. We provide group tours that focus on the dynamics of racism and prejudice in America, international human rights and the history of the Holocaust, through unique interactive educational exhibits. Main themes include the power of words and images, bullying, personal responsibility, and social action.

Additionally, the MOTNY is a professional development multi-media training facility targeting educators, law enforcement officials, and state/local government practitioners. Modeled after the successful Tools for Tolerance® Program at the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles, the MOTNY provides participants with intense educational and experiential training programs and welcomes school field trips and group tours. Over 10,000 adults and young people have been trained in the Museum’s customized, professional development programs.

Hall of Memories with Students 1

The Museum of Tolerance School Field Trips

Grades (7 – 12)

The Museum of Tolerance, New York (MOTNY) has various programs to engage middle and high school students in an important dialogue about issues facing society today – challenging students’ preconceptions and prejudices and inspiring them to impact their world.

The MOTNY is part of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, an international Jewish human rights organization dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust by fostering tolerance and understanding through community involvement, educational outreach and social action. The MOTNY is a multimedia training and educational museum located on East 42nd Street in the heart of Manhattan. Through unique interactive exhibits, we provide group tours that focus on the dynamics of racism and prejudice in America, international human rights and bullying prevention.

SCHEDULE A SCHOOL GROUP TOUR

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Current Exhibits Available at the MOTNY

Power of Words

The Power of Words exhibit features a film that demonstrates how modern-day figures like Martin Luther King, Jr., John F. Kennedy and Franklin Roosevelt used their words to instill hope while others like Hitler, Stalin and Osama Bin Laden and other extremists used the same power to spread lies and incite hatred.

Hall of Memory

The Hall of Memory includes a Holocaust documentary produced by the Simon Wiesenthal Center and a thought provoking film, In Our Time, which presents examples of genocide in the 20th and 21st centuries, such as Darfur and Cambodia, and reflects upon the lessons of history for today.

GlobalHate.com

Based on ongoing Simon Wiesenthal Center research and investigation of hate on the internet, Globalhate.com is equipped with touch screen computer terminals that unmask the dangerous proliferation of hate on the internet and introduce questions for critical thinking in a media saturated society.

Millenium Machine

The Millennium Machine offers a media presentation that focuses on pressing human rights issues such as the plight of refugees and political prisoners, the exploitation of women and children, and the threats of domestic and international terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. Participants in this immersive theatre experience will test their knowledge of the subject matter via automated response technology and are challenged to discuss solutions to these complex, global problems.

Point of View Diner

The Point of View Diner is a modern cyber-café that screens a variety of scenarios portraying situations of escalating conflict in a contemporary American context. Through the use of cutting edge technology, group members have the opportunity to individually ‘interview’ the main characters in each video scenario and then register their personal opinions on the issues raised. The results of the anonymous vote are instantly tabulated, providing a springboard for dialogue on violence prevention, conflict resolution and personal responsibility. Video scenarios included the Freedom of Speech, Teen Bullying, and Domestic Violence.

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Tools for Tolerance® for Teens

Trained facilitators utilize the unique MOTNY environment and customized classroom work to challenge students to assume greater personal responsibility in recognizing and challenging forms of discrimination.

In addition, main areas of focus are bullying prevention and leadership skills.  This five-hour program encourages young people to think critically about the words and images in their own lives and how to use them to create positive change.

The cost for a Tools for Tolerance® for Teens Program is $100 per participant (minimum 15 visitors) and includes lunch and materials.

Contact information:

Dr. Natasha Poor

Manager of Education and Public Outreach

Museum of Tolerance New York

Phone: 212.697.1180 x104

Fax: 212.697.1314

E-mail

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