Interactive Living History

Interactive Living History

The Paul Revere House.jpg
19 North Square, Boston, MA, United States
(617) 523-2338(617) 523-2338
(617) 523-1775

On the night of April 18, 1775, silversmith Paul Revere left his small wooden home in Boston’s North End and set out on a journey that would make him into a legend. Today that home is still standing at 19 North Square and has become a national historic landmark. It is downtown Boston’s oldest building and one of the few remaining from an early era in the history of colonial America.

The home was built about 1680 on the site of the former parsonage of the Second Church of Boston. Increase Mather, the Minister of the Second Church, and his family (including his son, Cotton Mather) occupied this parsonage from 1670 until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1676. A large and fashionable new home was built at the same location about four years later.

Paul Revere owned the home from 1770 to 1800, although he and his family may not have lived here in some periods in the 1780s and 90s. After Revere sold the home in 1800, it soon became a tenement, and the ground floor was remodeled for use as shops, including at various times a candy store, cigar factory, bank and vegetable and fruit business. In 1902, Paul Revere’s great-grandson, John P. Reynolds Jr. purchased the building to ensure that it would not be demolished. Over the next few years, money was raised, and the Paul Revere Memorial Association formed to preserve and renovate the building. In April 1908, the Paul Revere House opened its doors to the public as one of the earliest historic house museums in the U.S. The Association still oversees the preservation and day-to-day operations of this national treasure.

[showhide type=”typeA” more_text=”School Group Trips  and Programs- Click Here” less_text=”Hide Information” hidden=”yes”]

Paul Revere House for School Group Trips Grades 1 – 12

The Paul Revere House offers interactive educational programs designed to acquaint students with Boston’s long and colorful history. Built in the 1680s for a wealthy merchant, the house became home to silversmith and famous midnight rider Paul Revere during the Revolutionary era. In the 19th century, landlords divided the structure into cramped apartments for immigrant families. Containing remnants of many periods,the house provides a perfect setting in which to explore everyday life from colonial times to the early 20th century.

Reservations

We begin accepting reservations for the current school year the day after Labor Day.

Reservations must be made at least two weeks in advance.

We accept reservation requests by phone(617-523-2338) or by fax. Before contacting the Education Department please fill out a Reservation Request Form (available to download below) to assist you in the planning process. We do not accept reservation requests by email. If you are planning to make a booking for April, May, or June, we encourage you to contact us several months in advance as these are popular times for field trips to the museum. The Paul Revere House also offers Outreach and Distance Learning Programs for School Groups. Please see School Group Trip Programs below to see which programs are available for Distance Learning to your School

Please remember that you do not have a reservation until we have confirmed the arrangements with you by telephone and you have received a written confirmation.

To request a reservation for a Paul Revere House site visit
or program, please use our Reservation Request Form

School Group Trip Programs

Site Visit

For groups walking the Freedom Trail or on a whirlwind tour of Boston,this is the perfect option. Outside the Revere House, a member of the museum staff tells the story of Revere’s ride and presents a brief history of his home. Inside the building, museum staff provide a fascinating glimpse into everyday life for the Revere family, describing the intriguing furnishings and personal artifacts on display. Plenty of time is available for questions. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 30 – 45 minutes
  • Grades: 1st – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 40 people at a time.
  • Larger groups may reserve consecutive times (30 minutes apart).
  • Fee: 75 cents per child 5-17, $2.50 per college student or senior over 62, $3.00 per adult

The Man Behind the Myth

During a short slide presentation, children find out what really happened on Revere’s midnight ride. In small groups, students examine letters, advertisements and reproduction artifacts, looking for clues about the man behind the myth. Intriguing details emerge about Revere’s personality, contributions to the Revolution, large family and many business ventures. An interactive tour of Revere’s house completes the program. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 4th – 7th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130
  • One hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride: Storytelling Program

Find out what really happened during Paul Revere’s midnight ride. Watch a short slide show which separates the facts from the myths surrounding the ride, then retrace Revere’s route from his home in North Square towards the Charles River. Children don hats and carry props as they go,taking on the roles of Paul and Rachel Revere, their children, British soldiers, rowers, Samuel Adams, John Hancock and many others. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 1st – 3rd
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

Walking Tour: Paul Revere’s Boston

Explore the neighborhood where Paul Revere lived and worked. This tour includes stops at the locations of Revere’s silversmith shop and foundry, Boston’swaterfront, Copp’s Hill Cemetery and outside the Old North Church. As they explore the North End, students gather details about Revere’s life by inspecting prints and reproduction artifacts, and discover how Revere used Boston’s geography to his advantage. Price includes a tour of the Revere House and pre-visit materials.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 20 students per tour. Two tours may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130

The Revere Children and the Siege of Boston

After his midnight ride, Paul Revere couldn’t return to Boston. Whatbecame of his family as patriot forces besieged the city, trying toexpel the British troops? Children find out as they take on the roles ofSarah, helping her mother pack to flee the city, and Paul Jr., leftbehind to guard the house against marauding soldiers. Pre-visitmaterials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 6th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

Boston’s North End: The Immigrant Experience

Paul Revere’s North End changed dramatically in the 1800s as Irish,Eastern European and Italian immigrants settled in the colonialdwellings in enormous numbers. At the City of Boston Archaeology Lab,students examine 19th-century personal care items, toys and kitchenutensils excavated at the Revere House. Each artifact providesfascinating clues about the families who lived and worked in the RevereHouse when it was a boarding house.

On a walking tour through the NorthEnd’s twisting streets and alleyways students hear accounts of childrenwho grew up in the nearby tenements, discovering how they helped supporttheir families by working as “newsies,” trooped to the local bath housewith little brothers or sisters in tow, played stickball, and helpedtend rooftop gardens. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students per tour.
  • Two tours may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130

Fun and Games in the 1700s

Introduce young children to life in colonial Boston through games popular in the Reveres’ era. Inside the Revere House, students search for beans, thimbles, a bed wrench and other household items colonial families incorporated into pastimes. Students then try their hands at games such as Snail, Button-Button, Jackstraws, Beast-Fish-Fowl, and Ninepins. Fascinating details emerge about many aspects of daily life. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: PreK-1st
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

[/showhide]

Plimoth Plantation.jpg
137 Warren Avenue, Plymouth, MA, United States

School Groups Field Trips at Plimoth Plantation offer a fascinating and personal look at the lives of the Native Wampanoag People and the Pilgrims, the English who lived in early Plymouth Colony. In addition to a self-guided Museum tour, School groups have a number of options for tailoring their visit. School Groups with a specific interest, such as early gardens, period cookery, colonial religion, Native culture, timber-frame construction, or navigation, may book a speaker through our Professional Speakers Bureau or a Guided Tour.

Our historical theme dining turns what might otherwise be just another restaurant meal into a memorable (and tasty!) addition to your visit for you School Field Trips. We offer themed meals with Pilgrim and or Native hosts, and lunch or dinner with food historians who will teach your School groups just how Miles Standish ate his dinner without a fork. For more about historical or modern-day dining opportunities, go to our School Groups Dining page.

Student School groups also have a variety of choices to expand their stay, including Wampanoag School field trip enhancements, hands-on workshops, historical dining programs and overnight programs. We would be happy to combine any of these to create a package suitable to your needs. For more about our student school groups programs, go to our Education Programs section.

[showhide type="typeA" more_text="School Group Trips and Programs- Click Here" less_text="Hide Information" hidden="yes"]

School Groups Field Trips

Let Plimoth Plantation help you expand the walls of your classroom and inspire in your students a curiosity about and understanding of the past. Whether you bring your students to the museum or have us come to you, we will spark your students’ imaginations and make history come alive.

There’s a reason why Plimoth Plantation is one of the most popular field trip destinations in New England!  At Mayflower II, The 17th-Century English Village, and the Wampanoag Homesite, students are surrounded by the sights, smells and sounds of the 17th century. Visits to the Museum are a great way to spark the imagination of your students and help to make history come alive!

There are a variety of ways you can use our unique living history resources.

Plimoth Plantation Field Trips

Visits to the Museum immerse your students in the 17th-century world of the Wampanoag and Pilgrims. For more information on booking a field trip, visit our reservations page. Information on grant funding for field trips may be found at Foundations for Kids.  

Special Programs 

While you’re at the Museum, why not arrange for a special hands-on workshopguided tour or special meal? You can even plan an overnight stay! Learn more on our School Programs page.

We Can Visit You

Can’t make it to the Museum? We’ll bring the Museum to you! Our Pilgrims and Native museum teachers will go from class to class, for informative and fun hour-long classroom programs or traveling workshops.

Invite Plimoth Plantation to your school or group meeting.

School Classroom Visits

Our talented Pilgrim role players and Native museum teachers can bring the magic of Plimoth Plantation to your classroom; wherever you are. Their visits are a great way to prepare for a field trip and are a wonderful option for those who can’t make it to the museum.

For more information on inviting Plimoth Plantation to visit you, please go to We Can Visit You!

Speakers

Invite one of Plimoth Plantation’s captivating Pilgrim role players, Native speakers or historians to your next group meeting or function. Find out how at Professional Speakers.

School Groups Field Trips Planning Information

Admission discounts are available for School groups of 15 or more ages six and up.

Admission includes a self guided visit to the museum’s sites and exhibits.

If you need rate information for your school groups field trip or tour group, please call the group sales office at 508-746-1622, ext. 8358 during regular business hours (9am to 5pm Monday – Friday), or e-mail groupsales@plimoth.org.

Plimoth Plantation is a popular destination for adult and student tour school groups. Book early for the best times. Discounted rates apply for school groups of 15 or more people. Plimoth Plantation offers discounted rates for different types of groups. Please contact the Group Sales Office at 508-746-1622, ext 8358, or grouptours@plimoth.org for more information about rates.

To assist you in planning your visit, we recommend you allocate 3 hours at Plimoth Plantation and 1 hour at Mayflower II. Travel time between the two sites is approximately 15 minutes.

All school group field trips visits are self-guided tours of the Museum sites. Guided Tours are available on request for an additional fee.

Group Sales Office hours are 9 am – 5 pm, Monday – Friday. The office is closed weekends and holidays.

If our phone lines are busy, you may place your reservation request online. A confirmation will be emailed within one business day.

[/showhide]

PennyPacker Mills Civil War Reanactment.jpg
5 Haldeman Road, Schwenksville, PA 19473, United States

Serene country estate landscaped by Thomas Meehan & Sons to highlight the Colonial Revival mansion and surrounding farmland of 170 acres. Originally constructed about 1720, the mansion was redesigned and enlarged by architect Arthur Brockie in 1901 to enhance a country gentleman’s lifestyle. Fully furnished with antiques collected by former Pennsylvania Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker reflecting his interests in early Pennsylvania history, German and Dutch settlers, native Americans, the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. The collection also includes Governor Pennypacker’s political (1903 – 1907), genealogical and personal papers. Research by appointment.  Scope of Collections

Activities throughout the year include exhibits, nature walks, workshops, and special events.  Picnic facilities available. Large group and school tours are requested to call in advance to schedule visits. First floor of mansion and restrooms are handicap accessible.

[showhide type=”typeA” more_text=”School Group Trips – Click Here” less_text=”Hide Information” hidden=”yes”]

School and Camp Groups All Ages & Grades

The Experience

A tour of this colonial-revival mansion brings back early 20th-century middle-class living, but harkens to America’s glorious colonial past. Oil portraits, redware, scenic wallpaper and family antiques are mindful of the colonial era, but incorporated into an updated 1900 home.

Rooms harbor exquisite Victorian accoutrements, including children’s toys, and many facets of Pennsylvania history. The sprawling country estate is adjacent to the Perkiomen Creek with a landscape designed by Thomas Meehan & Sons in 1901.

History

Farming and milling became a way of life here for the original landowner Hans Jost Heijt in the early 1700s. Ancestors of Pennsylvania Governor Samuel Pennypacker bought the property in 1747 and owned it when Gen. Washington used Pennypacker Mills as headquarters in 1777. By 1903 Gov. Pennypacker, his wife Virginia and their children, used it as their summer home.

Originally constructed about 1720, the mansion at Pennypacker Mills was redesigned and enlarged by architect Arthur Brockie in 1901.

Ongoing Demonstrations, Activities and Shopping Opportunites

Civilian Street
Experience bread  baking, hair fashion, children’s  dolls, phrenology, children’s clothing, & cooking. Also, visit the
military engineers  and learn about map making & surveying.

Military Camps
Visitors are welcome to visit  both Confederate & Union camps where they can inspect the camps, food preparation, meet soldiers & learn about life in the Infantry.

Musicians
Saturday, see  Matthew Dodd throughout the  day on the Mansion Porch. Later in the day, stay after the battle for a early evening concert with the Irish Band of the PA 69th!

Artillery
Stop by both Artillery camps to learn about the cannons, roles of the crew, and ammunition. It’s a blast!
Sutlers
Our merchants sell a wide variety of Civil War Era merchandise from fabric & sewing needs, military & civilian clothing, and wooden toys & furniture.

Mansion Tours
Throughout the weekend tour the decorated mansion of Samuel Pennypacker and his family & visit the new exhibit
in the Galleries.

Museum Shop
Purchase old fashioned toys, period inspired gifts, and books. Buy your copy of Six Weeks in Uniform, Governor Pennypacker’s account of his experience in the Pennsylvania militia .

[/showhide]

New Hampshire Farmers Museum.jpg
1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton, NH, United States

The New Hampshire Farm Museum is a non-profit 501 c3 educational organization dedicated to preserving, promoting and carrying forward New Hampshire’s rural and agricultural heritage. The New Hampshire Farm Museum consists of two adjoining farmsteads situated on 50 acres located on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, New Hampshire. The historic Jones Farm and the Plummer Homestead are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and were passed down in the same families for two centuries. The Museum operates a working farm growing heirloom varieties of vegetables for our Community Supported Agriculture Program and for sale in our Country store. We raise hens for eggs and keep a small selection of heritage breed farm animals to support our educational efforts. We have displays of agricultural implements and educational exhibits on rural life and agriculture for the visiting public and our many visiting school children. We offer guided tours of the historic Jones farmhouse as well as farm animal tours. Special events and programs, workshops, and day camps are offered throughout the year.

[showhide type=”typeA” more_text=”School Group Trips and Programs” less_text=”Hide Information” hidden=”yes”]

Planning Your Group Visit

School, homeschools, scouting or camp groups are all welcome at the New Hampshire Farm Museum We need a minimum of 10 children or $60. to run a program. The museum accepts school and youth group visits from May 1st through December. Visits can be scheduled Tuesday through Friday 9:00 am to 4:00 pm depending on the program.

To Schedule Your Visit : Please call 603-652-7840 or email: info@farmmuseum.org.

We recommend one chaperon per ten students. Chaperons or home school parents are charged at half the student rate. There is no charge for teachers, group leaders, counselors or bus drivers or children ages 3 and under. In good weather students can pack a lunch to eat in our picnic area. We have an outdoor handicapped accessible restroom/port-a-potty. We can show students historic games like hoop rolling and graces for all to play with during lunch. We welcome students to shop in our Country Store if permitted during lunch break. The store contains many inexpensive items, educational toys, juice and soda, penny candy and farm grown produce and eggs.

School and Youth Programs at the NH Farm Museum

The New Hampshire Farm Museum provides a wonderful, hands-on opportunity for your students to explore New Hampshire’s agricultural heritage and see where farming and technology intersect with New Hampshire history.  Students who visit the museum have the opportunity to tour a working organic farm and learn about agricultural practices such as the “three sisters”, a method of co-planting corn, beans, and squash that the European settlers learned from the Native Americans. In addition to being a working farm, the museum is home to a vast collection of historic agricultural implements and artifacts of rural life including Daniel Webster’s plow and Horace Greeley’s privy and two historic farmhouses. No visit is complete without a chance to interact with the heritage breed farm animals!

Any of the following educational programs offered by the museum can be easily adapted to fit your curriculum and meet your class’s specific needs.

The Ox-Cart Man: Farms & Families at Work 

Program recommended for grades k-3. Offered May-mid-November. Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum, Approx. 3 hours

In this hands-on program based on NH poet Donald Hall’s story, The Ox-Cart Man, children explore the way families lived and worked in the past throughout rural New England. The students tour the 18th-century farmhouse cape and learn about the roles of each member of the household and how each was needed to make the family’s living. In gathering farm products to bring to market, they learn about the artifacts and objects of daily life in Colonial times. On their hunt through the barn they search for many of the farm objects depicted in the story and learn about barter and trade. Students make butter, meet our sheep, chickens, turkeys and pig, work with wool, try a planting or harvesting activity and help pack the ox-cart for the trip to Portsmouth.

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: Rural Life & Technological/Agricultural Evolution 

Program recommended for students grades 3-8. Offered May-mid-November Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum. Approx. 3 hours

The Jones Farmstead consists of a set of connected farm buildings referred to in an old children’s rhyme as, “Big House, little house, back house, barn.” Each piece of this connected farm structure tells a different story about New Hampshire history from Colonial times to the Twentieth century. In this hands-on program students learn about rural life and technological and agricultural change in New England as they tour the historic farmhouse, hunt for artifacts in the barn, and participate in farm chores. Students will view “Hands to Work,” a short film which uses oral histories and historic photographs of New Hampshire farming. They will try farm chores like grinding corn, carrying water with a yoke, and doing the wash. They will visit the farm animals and make butter. This program can be used supplement lessons on the transition from farms to factories as part of economic evolution or adapted to fit a range of other learning goals.

Hands to Work Program for Pre-schoolers

Program recommended for children ages 3-5 yrs. Offered May through mid-November. Cost: $5 per child. 10 student minimum- maximum: 25. Approx. 2 hours.

Children will learn all about the work on the farm and how the children helped in this completely hands-on program for pre-schoolers. They will grind the corn to feed the chickens, do the wash with washtub and wringer, pump the water at the well, feel the wool from the sheep, churn the cream to make butter, plant a seed or harvest the vegetables depending on the season and explore the Big Yellow Barn to hunt for fun things related to the farm.

An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving on the Farm 

Program recommended for children grades K – 5. Offered November 1st through November 20th. Cost: $7 per child 10 student minimum- maximum 45. Approx. 2 ½ hours.

New Hampshire has a special connection to Thanksgiving as it was our own Sarah Josepha Hale who persuaded President Lincoln in 1863 to declare it a National Holiday. Students will enjoy a tour through the historic farmhouse with costumed roleplayers portraying the Civil War Era. Then they will learn to grind and pound flint corn to make our cornbread and to churn cream into butter for our bread and press apples to make cider for us to drink. We will also explore the 104 ft. long great barn on a special barn hunt and visit with our heritage breed turkeys and other farm animals.

[/showhide]

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum.jpg
18 Highlawn Road, Warner, NH, United States

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum, Education and Cultural Center, is dedicated to connecting people of today with 20,000 years of ongoing Native American cultural expression. The Museum embraces cultural diversity and encourages responsible environmental action based on respect for nature. Through exhibitions and programs, the Museum seeks to challenge and inspire all of us to improve the quality of our lives and our world.

Voted by NH Magazine as the Best Cultural Center of 2012, Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum is a great place to bring the entire family. Fun educational tours, beautiful grounds, the Village of Warner and Rollins State Park are all reasons to visit. Children will appreciate the scenic sets, animated characters, and realistic costumes to be discovered at Mt. Kearsarge!

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum brings you on a memorable journey encompassing the amazing diversity of North American Indian cultures and reverence for nature. Discover the past by examining artifacts left behind in various ancient Indian territories. Combination tours also include a guided walk through the Medicine Woods Nature Trail featuring 100 plants native to our area, that were used by Native peoples for tools, medicines, shelter, and more!

Don’t forget to make a pit stop at The Dream Catcher Gift Shop to purchase a souvenir on your way out!

glowing bear claw icon

[showhide type=”typeA” more_text=”School Group Trips and Programs” less_text=”Hide Information” hidden=”yes”]

glowing turtle icon Educational Tours
Over the course of 20 years, MKIM has offered educational group tours to over 105,000 children. Education is the core of our mission and we look forward to welcoming your group on a memorable journey encompassing the amazing diversity of North American Indian cultures and reverence for nature. In addition to school tours, MKIM offers tours for homeschoolers, scout tours, senior tours, and special interest tours for groups such as cultural awareness, gardening, craft, Native studies, and museum studies groups.Groups begin their visit by viewing a 10-minute DVD that orients them to the museum. Museum Educators introduce themselves and lay out the framework and rules for the tour. Then the journey begins!

Enter the Northeastern Woodlands with its birch bark containers, moose hair embroidery and split ash baskets, into the Southeast with artifacts from the Seminole and Cherokee cultures. Around a corner, enter the Southwest with a fascinating discussion about corn, pueblo pottery, Navajo weaving and basketry from the western part of the country.

Next, step into the Plains Galleries.  This work, completed under the direction of Chris Bullock, Wampanoag, brings a full-scale furnished tipi into the galleries! Children and adults alike will marvel at this glimpse into Plains life with discussions of the American bison, beadwork and feather headdresses. The Northwest Coast is represented by artifacts such as harpoon heads, fur lined moccasins, model kayaks and more recent stone sculptures.

Finally, our Ceremonial Room focuses on the pipes, the musical instruments and the regalia that have been used in ceremonies of all kinds by Native Americans. Connect the Circle Tours also include a guided walk through of the Medicine Woods Nature Trail, where we have over 100 plants native to our area that have been used by Native peoples for tools, medicines, foods, dyes, transportation, shelter, and more. Click here to download a Group Reservation Form. 

MKIM is a natural resource for classroom teachers, home schoolparents, youth group leaders and enrichment coordinators. In addition to offering group tours of the museum the museum offers Educator Resource Kits, Outreach Programs and specifics on how MKIM aligns with the New Hampshire Department of Education’s State Curriculum Frameworks for Teaching Social Studies.

Plains-style tipi.  Photo by Richard Senor. 2008.

[/showhide]

Group tours

Guided tours of the Museum for groups of 10 or more are available by reservation only. Reservations can be made up to a year in advance. Please call (603) 456-2600 or download and mail in the Group Reservation Form to secure your spot today!

MUSEUM GROUP TOUR PRICES
Students 12 and Under $5.50
Students 17 and Under $6.50
Adults 18 and Over $7.50
Seniors 65 and Over $6.50
MUSEUM AND MEDICINE WOODS
TOUR PRICES
Students 12 and Under $10.50
Students 17 and Under $12.50
      Adult Chaperones $5.00
      Teacher Aides Free
Adults 18 and Over $14.50
Seniors 65 and Over $12.50
Kalmar Nyckel Wilmington Delaware.jpg
1124 E 7th St, Wilmington, DE, United States

The Original Kalmar Nyckel

The original Kalmar Nyckel was one of America’s pioneering colonial ships. Its historical significance rivals that of the Mayflower, yet her remarkable story has never been widely told.

Did you know…

The original Kalmar Nyckel sailed from Sweden to the New World in 1638 leaving its passengers to establish the first permanent European settlement in the Delaware Valley, the Colony of New Sweden in present-day Wilmington, Delaware. She made a total of four roundtrip crossings of the Atlantic—more than any other ship of the era. Her first voyage to the New World left 24 settlers of Swedish, Finnish, German and Dutch descent in the Delaware Valley. Joining them was a black freedman who sailed from the Caribbean aboard her companion ship the Fogel Grip.

The Present Day Kalmar Nyckel

The present day Kalmar Nyckel serves as Delaware’s seagoing goodwill ambassador. She was built by a group of committed citizens to be a continuing witness to the courage and spirit of those individuals who undertook the mid-winter North Atlantic crossing in 1637-1638.

Since 1998, the ship has served as an outreach platform for the State of Delaware and a catalyst for social and economic development. The ship provides a unique platform for the Foundation’s educational programming as well as a venue for diplomatic, recreational, governmental and commemorative functions. The ship is owned and operated by the Kalmar NyckelFoundation, a non-profit organization that offers people of all ages a variety of sea and land based learning and recreational experiences.

[showhide type=”typeA” more_text=”School Group Trips and Programs” less_text=”Hide Information” hidden=”yes”]

School Field Trips

Find more information about the Kalmar Nyckel including its specifications and History through the years by clicking the Image Above.

Join our award-winning ship and shipyard programs for fun, learning, and adventure.  As a full-scale re-creation of the colonial ship that brought the first permanent European settlers to Delaware and the Delaware Valley,Kalmar Nyckel is one of the world’s great educational resources.

Students get to travel back in time to the “Age of Sail” and rediscover Delaware’s fascinating colonial and maritime history.  Our typical ship and shipyard program can handle up to 84 students a day — with three (3) “underway” stations on the ship and four (4) interactive stations on land.  The program usually takes about 4 hours.  Participants engage in “hands-on history,” discovering that learning is fun and that fun can be informative.

Our ship and shipyard programs are available in a variety of formats and can be tailored to meet the academic needs of any group.

Be sure to learn more about our interactive education programming by viewing this short film detailing our “Starting A Colony” program.

Please contact the Kalmar Nyckel Foundation office at 302.429.7447 or sheed@kalmarnyckel.org for program pricing and additional information.

Please visit our 2013 Education Schedule for more information.

[/showhide]

JFK Library and Museum Boston.jpg
Columbia Point, Boston, MA 02125, United States

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum is dedicated to the memory of our nation’s thirty-fifth president and to all those who through the art of politics seek a new and better world. Located on a ten-acre park, overlooking the sea that he loved and the city that launched him to greatness, the Library stands as a vibrant tribute to the life and times of John F. Kennedy.

Come tour our Museum which portrays the life, leadership, and legacy of President Kennedy, conveys his enthusiasm for politics and public service, and illustrates the nature of the office of the President.

Students and scholars can also arrange to conduct research using our collection of historical materials chronicling mid-20th century politics and the life and administration of John F. Kennedy.

Experience our Museum through our three theaters, period settings, and 25 dramatic multimedia exhibits, and enter the recreated world of the Kennedy Presidency for a “first-hand” experience of John F. Kennedy’s life, legacy, and leadership.

Shop in our Museum Store or dine in the JFK Café. Walk along the Harborwalk or picnic on our beautiful grounds at the Harbor’s edge. From May to October, President Kennedy’s 26′ sailboat Victura is on display on our grounds.

[showhide type=”typeA” more_text=”School Group Trips and Programs” less_text=”Hide Information” hidden=”yes”]

School group comes to the JFK Library

On weekday mornings during the school year, the Library’s Department of Education and Public Programs offers a variety of structured programs for elementary, middle and high school classes visiting the museum. These programs are 2½ to 3 hours long, and are limited to 50 students per program. Teachers of grades 6-12 may also elect to bring their group for a self-guided museum visit.

All museum visits by school groups must be scheduled in advance. To schedule a self-guided visit, please call the Group Tour Coordinator at 617.514.1589. For further information on guided programs, contact the education staff at the numbers indicated in the program descriptions.

Guided Programs for Elementary and Middle School Groups

Our museum programs for grades 4-8 extend and enrich classroom studies in American history, Civics, and English Language Arts.

Who was John F. Kennedy? (Gr. 4-6)Elementary School group Museum
Students become biographers for the day as they explore John F. Kennedy’s early years, his presidency, and the contributions he made to our nation and the world. They analyze historic photographs and documents, view films and television footage, and examine objects in the museum as they gather and record information in our “Biographer’s Workbook.”

Allow 2 ½ hours. For further information, call 617.514.1649.

Presidential Campaigns and Elections (Gr. 4-6)

Using the 1960 election as a case study, students learn the steps to becoming President of the United States. Students explore objects, photographs, and documents in the museum to discover important information about the 1960 election. The last part of the visit includes an interactive game based on the steps to the presidency. A final discussion draws on students’ hopes and ideas to guide the next President of the United States.

Allow 2 ½ hours. For further information, call 617.514.1649.

Equal Rights for All: Investigating the Civil Rights Movement (Gr. 4-6)

As young historians, students study the civil rights movement through stories, films, photographs and documents. The museum portion of the program focuses on civil rights events during the Kennedy administration. Discussions and activities challenge students to think about fairness, equity and their own role in creating a more just world.

Allow 2 ½ hours. For further information, call 617.514.1649.

Leadership for the 60s (Gr. 6-9)

In this docent-led program designed for groups who are often visiting the Library for the first time, students explore the challenges John F. Kennedy faced as the nation’s leader and learn about the big ideas he put into action. A souvenir booklet of open-ended questions gives students historical context and encourages them to evaluate John F. Kennedy’s decisions and actions as president. The program, led by museum docents, includes an introductory group discussion about John F. Kennedy’s leadership qualities, the introductory film, guided exploration with booklet, and a wrap-up discussion.

Allow 2 hours. For further information, call 617.514.1545.

Report Card for the President (Gr. 7-8)

Students are usually the ones being graded, but in this program the tables are turned as they get to develop an evaluation form for assessing a Chief Executive’s performance. After examining an actual report card of John F. Kennedy’s when he was in middle school, students gather evidence from exhibits on JFK’s presidency about the various responsibilities that go with the nation’s highest office and the kind of leadership qualities that are needed. Students then develop a presidential report card based on their judgments about what factors are most important.

Allow 3 hours. For further information, call 617.514.1650.


Guided Programs for High School Groups

Our high school programs begin with a session in the museum’s classroom where students explore events and issues of the early 1960s using primary source documentsHigh School group in the Museum and audiovisual materials. Following the classroom session, the museum educator will work with students in the museum, helping students make connections between the museum exhibits and the classroom discussions. Teachers can choose one of the following topics:

Approaching a DBQ: An Introduction for AP Students

Students work on a document-based question similar to those on the AP exam using documents from the Kennedy Library archives and strategize tactics for successfully analyzing primary sources.

The Civil Rights Movement: 1960-1963

Students investigate the civil rights movement of the early 1960s–its goals, its major events, and the outcomes of these events. This program focuses on the Freedom Rides (1961) and the integration of the University of Mississippi (1962).

The Cold War Heats Up

Students analyze the Cold War’s impact on the politics and people of the early 1960s, and are introduced to conflicts between the US and the USSR over Berlin, Cuba, and space exploration.

Launching into the Sixties

Acting as members of President Kennedy’s Press Office, students are given an assignment to prepare a briefing for the President on topics that may come up in a specific press conference. To fulfill this assignment, they explore the museum and use primary source documents.

The Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Movement in the Early Sixties

Students to analyze the rhetoric surrounding civil rights in the early 1960s, focusing on a speech by Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett, a section from Martin Luther King’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail, and President Kennedy’s June 11, 1963 speech on civil rights.

Allow 3 hours for each high school program. Between 20-50 students can be accommodated per session except for Launching into the Sixties program which can accommodate up to 40 students. To make a reservation or for further information, call 617.514.1647.

[/showhide]

[showhide type="links" more_text="Interactive and Permanent Exhibits (%s More Words)" less_text="Hide Information (%s More Words)"]

Interactive Exhibits 

Clouds Over Cuba

Clouds over Cuba

Explore the Cuban Missile Crisis from various perspectives. This interactive exhibit sets the context of the early 1960s, and gives you the opportunity to explore What If? scenarios.

More Details


President's Desk

The Presidents Desk

Sit at President Kennedy’s Oval Office Desk and discover what it means to hold the highest office in the land.

More Details


World on the Brink: JFK and the Cuban Missile Crisis

World on a Brink

For 13 days in October 1962, a confrontation between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. brought the world to the abyss of nuclear destruction and the end of mankind. Read formerly classified documents and listen in on secretly recorded ExComm meetings as President Kennedy and his advisors seek a peaceful resolution for the removal of Soviet intercontinental missiles from Cuba.

More Details


Integrating Ole Miss

Integrating Ole Miss

In the fall of 1962 the college town of Oxford, Mississippi, erupted in violence. James Meredith, an African American, attempted to register at the all-white University of Mississippi, known as “Ole Miss.” This site lets visitors witness the events firsthand through the actual letters, recorded telephone conversations, and images of those who made history.

More Details


White House Diary

White House Diary

Travel back in time to the early 1960′s and experience first- hand each of President Kennedy’s thousand days in office through the interactive White House Diary – a daily schedule of President John F. Kennedy that includes digital scans of his actual appointment diary for any given day as well as video, audio, and photos of the day’s events.

More Details


Virtual Tour of the JFK Library Museum

Virtual Museum Tour

This online tour includes selected highlights of the museum’s introductory film and allows you to virtually explore selected exhibits and learn more about key items in the Museum collection.

More Details


We Choose the Moon

We Chose Moon

Each stage of this interactive online exhibit allows visitors to follow the historic moon landing minute by minute and explore archival photos and footage of President Kennedy’s pioneering space efforts. More than 1.3 million individuals logged on to launch of this international award-winning website during the July 2009 40-year anniversary of the five-day journey to the moon.

More Details

Permanent Exhibits 

Leadership for the 60's Campaign Button

Campaign Trail

After narrowly losing the vice presidential nomination in 1956, Senator John F. Kennedy sought the presidency in 1960. After hard-fought primary victories, JFK won his party’s nomination and faced-off against sitting Vice President Richard Nixon in a campaign that featured the first live-broadcast television debates between presidential candidates. After his election as the 35th president of the United States, JFK set out to redeem his campaign pledge to “get America moving again.”

More Details


Radio and Television

The Briefing Room 

John F. Kennedy was the first president to effectively use the new medium of television to speak directly to the American people through live televised press conferences. Video samples of his responses to reporters’ questions and exhibits of objects and documents illustrate the wide range of issues he confronted as President.  Also included is his speech to the people of West Berlin denouncing the construction of the Berlin Wall.

More Details


Launch of the Mercury MR-3 Space Capsule Freedom 7

The Space Race 

In 1961 responding to the Soviet Union’s lead in the exploration of space, President Kennedy challenged the United States to keep up in the “Space Race” and not fall behind the Soviets.  He said: “We have a long way to go in the space race. We started late. But this is the new ocean, and I believe the United States must sail on it and be in a position second to none”.  Kennedy set the goal of landing an American on the Moon before the end of the decade and initiated the programs to make it possible.

More Details


Robert F. Kennedy's US Treasury Badge

Attorney General Office

President Kennedy appointed his 35-year old brother Robert Francis Kennedy as the attorney general of the United States. The close working relationship of John and Robert Kennedy was one of the most unusual and successful in the history of American public life. When Robert Kennedy became attorney general, the civil rights struggle was entering a new phase of activism which precipitated the Justice Department involvement in protecting and upholding the rights of many African Americans.

More Details


Carolina Rocking Chair

Oval Office 

The Oval Office has been the President’s office since 1909.  The preference for an oval room dates back to George Washington, who greeted his guests standing in a circle around him, equally distant from the President.  The circle became a symbol of democracy.  President Kennedy personalized his Oval Office with his collections of ship models and scrimshaw, reflective of his lifelong affection for the sea and sailing.  In this setting visitors view a video covering the struggle against racial segregation in 1963.

More Details


Watercolor Painting of the White House Treaty Room

First Lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy

After becoming first lady at the age of thirty-one, Jacqueline Kennedy embarked on extensive historic restoration of the White House interiors, in which she sought to make the White House a museum of the presidency. Mrs. Kennedy also used the prestige of her position to champion American arts and culture, often inviting prominent actors, artists, writers, poets, and musicians to participate and perform at White House events. Her simple-yet-elegant sophistication and interest in other cultures made her well-known and beloved around the world.

More Details


Kennedy Commemorative Cup

Kennedy Family

John F. Kennedy was the offspring of two families, the Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, whose roots stretched back to Ireland. They immigrated to Boston in the 1840′s seeking greater economic opportunity, religious and political liberty in America. The Irish in particular readily adapted to the American political system. By the end of the nineteenth century the President’s two grandfathers had become successful Boston politicians, establishing the Kennedy tradition of political involvement.

More Details

[/showhide]

Howell Living History Farm.jpg
101 Hunter Road, Titusville, Hopewell Township, NJ, United States

Howell Living History Farm is a time machine that takes you back to the year 1900 – a time when horses and buggies traveled the lanes of Pleasant Valley, and when farms were bordered by snake fences and Osage orange trees.

You were a farmer, then…the kind that could drive a team of horses and plow a furrow with a walking plow. You could build a barn, or deliver a lamb, or bake a loaf of bread from wheat that you grew yourself. And you may have been remembered for the time you canned 200 quarts of tomatoes in a day, or the May Day you went to town in a one-horse sleigh.

Today, if it is time to harvest corn, you can ride up into a field in a horse drawn wagon, help us shock and pick corn, and return to the barnyard to help shell it, grind it, and bake it into cornbread. We invite you to help us plant, cultivate and harvest our crops, to care for our animals, to sweep our barn, to make soap, butter and ice cream, and of course to sit under the maple tree and talk about the future. (The future looks good, by the way. There are rumors of “combines”, horseless buggies and automatic ice cream makers.)

[showhide type="typeA" more_text="School Group Programs" less_text="Less Information" hidden="yes"]

School Group Programs

Program Fees

All programs except for “Farm Animals” and “Summer on the Farm” are $75.00 for in-county visitors and $100.00 for out-of-county visitors for each group of 25 people or less. (This includes adult chaperones as well).

Farm Animals is $4.00 per person (in-county); and $5.00 per person (out-of-county) .

The Summer on the Farm program is $100.00 for in-county and $125.00 for out-of-county.

Farm Programs:

Ice Harvesting: Work with farmers on the frozen pond, where volunteers from your group will help to score, cut and float ice. Everyone will help when it is time to pull the ice blocks up a wooden track to the icehouse. Blocks are lowered into the icehouse via a chute, and then packed in layers of sawdust. (If there is no ice on the pond, your group will work with commercial ice just as farmers did in 1900 if winters were mild.)

Tree Tapping and Sap Gathering: Learn how to identify a sugar maple tree. Volunteers from your group will help us tap a sugar maple tree. All will taste the sap if it is flowing before beginning the work of collecting it from the many trees in our “sugarbush”. You will load some of the sap on a horse or oxen drawn wagon to take back to the farm for syrup making.

Sheep Care: Learn about the care of our sheep as you pet the lambs, help brush the ewes, and visit the flock in the sheep yard. Help process wool using our hand cranked carding machine to prepare it for spinning. Learn about the many uses for wool products on a 1900 family farm.

FARM ANIMALS PROGRAM: Station Activities

Corn Planting: Learn about corn planting technology by using hand sowing methods used throughout history…and by planting corn using a circa 1900, animal-drawn seeder. Discover why seeders like this one – and why tractor-drawn seeders- are still “future” technology for most of the world’s farmers

Wagon Tour of Farming Operations: Old-fashioned horsepower will pull your wagon into a landscape reminiscent of the Hopewell Township of a century ago, when farm lanes were bordered by snake fences and osage orange trees, and when farmers still worked by hand and horsepower to cultivate their fields of corn, oats, wheat and hay. Operations vary daily, so there is no telling what you might see: a reaper-binder or haytedder in action, a flock of sheep coming in from the meadow, or a farm crew bringing in the sheaves.

[/showhide]

FAIRBANKS MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM VT.gif
1302 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, VT, United States

The Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium is much more than Northern New England’s museum of natural history — it is a place to marvel at the wonders of our world.  Perfect for families and visitors of all ages, the Fairbanks Museum invites you to explore your universe.

Inside our classic Victorian building, you’ll find a dazzling array of animals and artifacts, dolls and tools, shells and fossils, and much more! Take a trip through the cosmos in Vermont’s only public planetarium, and see weather forecasts in the works in our Eye on the Sky Weather Gallery. A full calendar of events, workshops, lectures and field programs invites everyone to explore the nature of our world.

 Inside, our collections include some 175,000 objects:

  • 75,000 natural science specimens (mounted birds, mammals, reptiles and fish; insects; nests and eggs; shells; fossils; rocks and minerals; herbarium)
  • 95,000 historical artifacts (tools; toys; dolls; textiles; weapons; archival photographs and documents)
  • 5,000 ethnological items representing Oceania, the Near East, Africa, Egypt, Japan and native North America.

The only public planetarium in the state of Vermont opened in 1961 and continues to offer guided tours of the cosmos every week.

Discover … Explore … Experience … Inspire …

CURRENT EXHIBITS AVAILABLE HERE

[showhide type="pressrelease" more_text="School Group Field Trips - Click here for more information" less_text="Hide Information" hidden="yes"]

We have prepared a wondrous array of curriculum guides to help teachers and parents create activities within the Museum and beyond its walls. Our aim is to inspire curiosity and self-directed learning, so that children become life-long naturalists, always interested in the world around them.

The Museum’s learning experiences take place in our awe-inspiring galleries, state-of-the-art Lyman Spitzer Jr. Planetarium, Nature Classroom, classic learning hall and outdoor space.

Contact us to plan your visit to the Museum.

For Teachers:
The Museum’s Education team is ready to work with you and your school to help your students engage in active learning that excites them. Our curriculum guides are designed to meet VT State Standards.

The Museum is a fabulous and memorable destination for field trips! Let us help you plan this excursion.

Your class or group can come to the Museum for a field trip or for repeated learning experiences. Fees include 1 FREE chaperone for every 5 students.Choose from the following program options:

  • $5/student for a gallery tour
  • $8/student for 1 program
  • $10/student for 2 programs
  • Minimum rates apply for groups with fewer than 10 students.

Click here to plan your visit to the Museum.

Solar Slumber

It is easy to take the Sun for granted.  After all, it NEVER fails to shine, even if the clouds get in the way.  Recently, better technology has permitted astronomers to observe the Sun in great detail, revealing much more about the Sun.  It also shows many things we don’t know about the Sun.  While the Sun’s steady nature makes life on Earth possible, changes in daily, seasonally, and long-term solar activity affects our atmosphere, our satellites, and life on the Earth.

Students will learn to safely view the Sun, weather-permitting, and will observe (live or through images) details on the Sun’s surface.  Students will analyze data to discover patterns of solar activity, and then discuss the possible affects of the Sun on the Earth, including recent information about decreased solar activity.

NGSS: ESS1.A, ESS1.B, PS3

 Solar Slumber
 bell

BOING!

Does sound cause movement?

Does movement make sound?

How does sound travel through the air?

Discover the properties of sound while making some of your own sounds.  Develop basic musical instruments to test your observations.  Using tools and ourselves, we will discover what makes sound and what does not. By the end we will solve the problem of how to use our bodies to demonstrate how sound traverses distance.

NGSS: 1-PS4-1, 1-PS4-4

Werewolves, Vampires and Zombies!

Parasites and Poisons that can control our minds!

Although there are no supernatural monsters in this lesson, we will explore the ways in which real parasites have taken over their hosts, and how they may have inspired monster myths! Have you ever wondered what happens to a person who contracts rabies? Could parasites be responsible for some people’s reckless and dangerous behavior? Could toxins and poisons in nature cause people to behave like monsters themselves? This lesson is ideally suited for Third Grade through Middle School students.

NGSS: 3-LS4, 4-LS1, MS-LS1, MS-LS2, MS-LS3, MS-LS4

 dracula
 

Have a Ball!

What goes up must come down, but that law of motion doesn’t mean all objects travel on or through all surfaces the same.

Your students need only bring their innate curiosity and their creative and critically thinking minds to be ready for this class!

 

[/showhide]

[showhide type="links" more_text="Planetarium Programs - Click for More Information (%s More Words)" less_text="Hide Information"]

Delve into our Solar System and beyond in the Lyman Spitzer, Jr. Planetarium!

Planetarium experiences can expose your students, club members or community group to the stars and constellations, our moon, the planets, even concepts like orbits and gravity.

Planetarium Topics

  • Our Solar System
  • American Indian Star Stories
  • Tonight’s Skies
  • The Moon
  • Mythology and the Stars

Plan your visit to the Lyman Spitzer Jr. Planetarium


Our staff meteorologists, the voices of the Eye on the Sky weather broadcasts, are also our weather educators.
What better source could there be for learning about the science behind weather and climate!

Introduction to Weather Instruments

What kinds of tools does a weatherperson use to measure what’s going on in the air? How do they work? Thermometers (liquid and bimetallic), anemometer, wind vane, barometer, psychrometer and rain gauge are explained and passed around for close inspection. A brief trip to the Weather Center and the Instrument Shelter closes the time.
Duration: 50 minutes, flexible for K (can include Weather Center/Instrument Shelter).
Suitable for grades K-3


Weather Center and Instrument Shelter

The title says it all! A guided view of the Northern New England Weather Center, including instruments and telecommunications equipment; then a quick trip to the Instrument Shelter for an explanation of its workings.


 

Weatherlore

Before computers, The Weather Channel, even the Old Farmer’s Almanac, forecasting the weather was a do-it-yourself project. And so, through hundreds of years of observing the weather, reliable signs were compiled and passed on, becoming those quaint country quips like when the cows lay down at midday, rain in on the way. Yet most, if not all of these bits of weather wisdom work. A look at the sayings, the science behind them, and a way for you to use them to forecast your own weather.
Appropriate for all ages.


 

How Do We Make a Forecast?

A day in the Life of a Meteorologist
An explanation of the process of making a weather forecast. We cover everything from taking local observations; through mapping regional, national, or hemispheric observations and using satellite imagery; to using computer model output. By the end your students should have a good understanding of how a meteorologist organizes his or her thoughts when faced with the task of figuring out the weather from 2 hours to 2 weeks into the future.
Best for Grade 4 & up.


Weather a la Carte!

  • Wind
  • Pressure
  • Temperature
  • Moisture

These lessons could be presented one of two ways:

  • A short lesson focusing on one of four topics, with a “hands on” activity to follow, or,
  • A longer lesson focusing on one of four topics, with follow up materials provided for your class to conduct “hands-on” experiments back at school.

Suitable for students from Kindergarten to the third grade.

Plan your Weather Program visit.

[/showhide]

Essex Steam Train and River Boat 1.jpg
Railroad Avenue, Essex, CT 06426, United States

Essex Steam Train & Riverboat’s 2½-hour journey begins at the historic 1892 Essex Station for a 12-mile, narrated round-trip into the heart of the unspoiled Connecticut River Valley – designated “one of the last great places on earth” by the Nature Conservancy.

The steam locomotive pulls vintage coaches at 20 mph through the quintessential New England towns of Deep River and Chester. The picturesque countryside includes pristine meadows, a quaint farm, a millpond with waterfall, and trestles and bridges over rivers and creeks. A natural highlight is the undeveloped Selden Neck State Park, accessible only by boat.

Essex Steam Train offers unique access to several coves and preserves, immersing passengers in an on-board eco-excursion. The train travels near the tidal wetlands of Pratt Cove and Chester Creek – – bountiful, natural habitats for birds. Among those typically spotted are Cormorants, Ducks, Swans, Greenland Geese, Blue Heron, Egrets, and Red-winged Blackbirds. In February and March, the majestic Bald Eagle is the star of the show, when it migrates south to the Connecticut River Valley from Canada and Maine.

At Deep River Landing, passengers are escorted onto the Becky Thatcher riverboat for a 1¼- hour cruise along the Connecticut River. The visual serenity of the river valley is on full display from Becky’s multiple decks. The deep water, coves, inlets, marshes, wildlife, and rocky shoreline are all at once, simply breathtaking! Just as impressive are the historic sights including Gillette Castle, Goodspeed Opera House, and the Haddam Swing Bridge. Upon Becky’s return to Deep River Landing, the steam train welcomes passengers for the return trip back to Essex Station.

[showhide type="pressrelease" more_text="School Trips" less_text="Hide Information(%s Less Words)" hidden="yes"]

SCHOOL TRIPS 

School Field Trips
Here at Essex Steam Train we love kids! A ride on the Essex Steam Train and the Connecticut Riverboat offers many educational touchstones:

  • The science of our steam engines
  • The history of our railroad and vintage rail cars
  • The ecology and history of the river valley
  • Cruise by historic Gillette Castle, Goodspeed Opera House, and other sights

Round trip ticket is $12.00 per person. Operating dates are Monday – Friday, June 3 – June 14, 2013. Please contact our office for more information on an enjoyable and educational field trip.

Teachers! You can download a 7 Page Fun Activities file with word games, railroad glossary, landmarks, and trivia. Perfect for the bus trip to the Essex Steam Train! (439KB)

Box Lunches
Schools can arrange for box lunches arranged by the railroad. Your group can enjoy:

  • Sandwich (Choice of Ham, Turkey, Roast Beef)
  • Potato Chips and Cookie
  • Bottled Water

All lunches must be consumed at the Essex Depot picnic area or on the boat – there is no eating or drinking allowed on the train.

Box Lunches must be ordered at least 5 business days before the date of your visit. Please give us a call for pricing and with any questions!

[/showhide]

Dinosaur State Park.jpg
400 West Street, Rocky Hill, CT, United States

Welcome to Dinosaur State Park

The Connecticut Valley has a long history of fossil track discoveries. Outstanding specimens uncovered in 19th century brownstone quarries found their way into museums throughout the world. A new chapter in the history of such discoveries was written in 1966 when hundreds of tracks were exposed in Rocky Hill. This remarkable site became Dinosaur State Park.

Outdoor activities include walking trails that lead past 25 life-size concrete and steel dinosaurs. See the creatures that roamed the state up to 230 years ago on the Connecticut Trail; try out Monty’s Splashpad, a state of the art interactive water play. Inside, kids can continue their discoveries in the Bone Zone, where they can dig for faux fossils, dig for crystals, pan for gold and do not leave without shopping in the 10,000 square foot retail area.

[showhide type="links" more_text="School Group Programs Grades 1 to 12th Grade - Click for More Information" less_text="Hide Information"]

School Groups All Ages and Grades

Grades 1-5 Fun with Fossils – Travel back in time to learn what Connecticut was like at the time of the dinosaurs, and what we can learn about dinosaurs from their footprints and other fossils. Students will examine a variety of fossils and dinosaur models to learn about what made dinosaurs unique. Core Science Standards 1.2, 3.2, 4.2, 4.3
Grades 3-5 Rocks & Minerals Around Us – The rocks and minerals around us tell a story of dramatic changes in Connecticut over hundreds of millions of years. We also use many of these materials in our lives today. Students will examine samples of rocks and minerals from around Connecticut, explore their distinctive properties, and discuss ways we use these materials. Core Science Standards 3.1, 3.3, 4.3
Grades 6-8 Connecticut Landforms  – The Connecticut landscape around us today was shaped over hundreds of millions of years by colliding continents, erupting lava, flowing water, and massive ice sheets. Students will learn how these forces interacted by examining the shape of the land surface and samples of bedrock from key locations around the state. Core Science Standard 7.3
Grades 9-12 Evolution – Find out how the dinosaur footprints in Connecticut relate to the larger story of evolution through time, beginning with Earth’s earliest lifeforms and leading to the rise of the mammals in the Cenozoic. Choose from a timeline activity examining key evolutionary events, or a fossil-dating activity. Core Science Standard 10.5
Grades 9-12 Earth Systems – The dinosaur footprints and rocks found in Connecticut provide evidence for the cycling of matter and energy through the Earth system. Students will examine rock samples from Connecticut and piece together the exciting story of moving plates and changing environments that made Connecticut what it is today. Core Science Standards 9.1, 9.4, 9.5, 9.7, and 9.8
Also available at the Park:
  • Outdoor Casting Area – Make a plaster cast of a dinosaur footprint (seasonal -bring own material).
  • Mine for Gems and Fossils in our outdoor mining sluice (seasonal – additional fee applies)
  • Outdoor Picnic area
  • 2 1/2 miles of hiking trails
  • Bookstore – contact us for information about pre-purchased “Treasure Bags” for your group.

[/showhide]

Childrens Theater and Museum of Maine.jpg
142 Free St, Portland, ME 04101, United States

Located in the Arts District of downtown Portland, the Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine features a wide variety of interactive exhibits and activities for children and families! The Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine exists to inspire discovery and imagination through exploration and play.

The Museum & Theatre serves as an indispensable resource for families and educators, helping to create a broad community devoted to our children’s development and learning.

The Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine serves as an indispensable resource for educators. In addition to inspiring discovery and imagination through exploration and play, we offer a variety of educator-led school programs. All programs are linked to the Maine Learning Results and can be adapted to suit the needs of your students. Group visits allow your students to learn through play while exploring the Museum & Theatre. Adding an optional educational program can enhance your group’s experience, teaching your students about science, culture, arts and theatre with hands-on, artifact-rich learning experiences. Our educators are eager to make your job easier – please let us know how we can best serve your needs and the needs of your students!

[showhide type="pressrelease" more_text="School Group Programs" less_text="Hide Information" hidden="yes"]

School Group Programs 

Onsite Programs & Group Visits

onsite science and animal education

Kids on the Block puppet show

The Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine serves as an indispensable resource for educators. In addition to inspiring discovery and imagination through exploration and play, we offer a variety of educator-led school programs. Group visits allow your students to learn through play while exploring the Museum & Theatre. Adding a program can enhance your group’s experience, teaching your students about science, culture, arts and theatre with hands-on, artifact-rich learning experiences. Our educators are eager to make your job easier – please let us know how we can best serve your needs and the needs of your students!

BOOKING A VISIT TO THE MUSEUM

Reservations

Group reservations must be confirmed with a Museum & Theatre staff person at least 24 hours in advance. Please begin by clicking the appropriate link below to submit your group reservation request. A staff member will contact you to confirm that your requested time is available, arrange the details of your visit and process payment.

Click here to complete an online request form for a Group Visit.

Click here to complete an online request form for a Group Visit with a Program.

Schedule

Schedule a two-hour visit on Tuesday through Friday (9am-5pm).

Group Size

Groups of 10 or more are eligible for group admission rates.

Rates

$6 per person for a two hour visit to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own!

$7 per person for a two hour visit plus a program: visit includes time to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own.

Two adults per 10 children are admitted free. Payment can be made on the day of the visit. Checks, credit cards and purchase orders are accepted.

Special Offer!

Receive $0.50 off each admission when your group visits in September, October, January or February.

During our programs, our educators share a variety of scientific and cultural resources with your group, encouraging hands-on learning, discovery and engagement.

We frequently revise our programs to ensure a high quality experience for students and educators. If you have booked a program in the past and you want to be sure that specific features are still included, please discuss your expectations at the time of booking.

THEATRE PERFORMANCES FOR GROUPS

Group Size

Groups of 10 or more are eligible for group ticket rates.

Groups up to 65 total adults and children may book a theatre performance.

Rates

Advance payment is required for theatre productions.

$7 per person for a 45 minute performance

$13 per person for a 45 minute performance plus play time: visit includes time to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own.

$400 to book a private show (1 month advance payment required; additional play time not included; audience max of 65)

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR GROUPS

Science, Arts and Culture Programs

Camera Obscura

Ideal for grades K to Adult

How do our eyes really work? Find out inside of our Camera Obscura, a room-sized optical exhibit demonstrating principles of light, perspective and vision. Discover the similarities between cameras, our eyeballs and periscopes in this interactive show, then create a collaborative piece of camera obscura art to take back to your classroom.

Color Matters

Ideal for grades K to 5

Markers, magazines and cameras all process color, but in very different ways. Investigate the world of color systems at a series of interactive art and science stations. We’ll find that there is much more to color than what meets the eye!

Prehistoric Fossil Detectives

Ideal for grades K to 5

What is a fossil, and what can it tell us? Experience the life of a fossil through dramatic play, and then explore our collection of prehistoric fossil replicas to determine which creatures they once belonged to. You’ll get to touch and examine real dinosaur fossils!

Maine Animal Adaptations

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 3

Discover an array of Maine animal adaptations using drama and real artifacts from the Museum & Theatre’s collection. Compare the natural abilities and limitations of a variety of animals – even humans! Handle amazing animal artifacts like a moose antler, a turtle shell, mammal teeth, skulls and furs.

Meet the Turtles!

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

Learn about the anatomy and biology of various turtles and tortoises from land and sea. Explore real turtle artifacts like shells and skulls. Make your own observations when you get up close and personal with our yellow-bellied slider turtles.

Ocean Exploration: An Interactive Puppet Show

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 3

Learn about the ocean through the eyes of a little clownfish who’s going on a big adventure! Pretending we’re ocean creatures, we’ll explore everything from the shallowest tidepool to the darkest depths of the midnight zone.

Recycle Challenge

Ideal for grades K to 5

Reduce, reuse, recycle! We’ll explore these important conservation concepts in all sorts of playful ways. Have a recycle relay race, witness amazing recycling transformations and discover nature’s own recyclers.

Rock Cycle

Ideal for grades K to 5

Geology, art and mystery converge when we uncover the three stages of the rock cycle. Build your own model rock from scratch to learn how rocks compose our earth and discover all the ways they are part of our daily lives. Work in teams to explore mysterious situations and identify rocks, gems or fossils. View, touch and investigate rock and mineral specimens from the Museum & Theatre’s collection.

Simple Machines

Ideal for grades K to 5

When you use simple machines to solve silly problems, you earn superhero powers! Learn how to find practical solutions to real world problems and make work easier by rotating through six simple machine model stations.

StarLab: The Science of Constellations

Ideal for grades K to 5

What is a star made of? How did the ancients use the stars like a compass? Learn about the intersection between science and culture by observing the night sky in our mini planetarium. We’ll also analyze a set of stars and make up our own constellation myth. Choose a cultural theme: Greek, Navajo/Dine* or Chinese.

Navajo/Dine available September-March only

The Story of Istar the Whale

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 2

Using large format illustrated story cards we’ll share the life story of Istar, a real humpback whale who lives in the Atlantic Ocean. Learn about her daily routine, including what she eats, the places she travels, and with whom she spends her time. After learning about this famous whale’s life, we’ll go inside an inflatable 45 foot, life-size replica of her body.

We Are Maine: Explore India

Ideal for grades K to 5

Learn about India through the eyes of Jaharanara, a Maine child who has Indian family roots. You’ll explore aspects of Indian culture with your senses. We’ll smell aromatic spices, listen to Bollywood music and even learn to write a word in Hindi.

Whale Science

Ideal for grades 1 to 5

Compare and contrast the size of whale intestine, vertebrae and brain to those of a human. Discover differences between whales and dolphins by investigating real whale baleen. Learn about the many ways humpback whales travel through and adapt to their environments in order to survive. Then take a trip inside of Istar, our life-size inflatable humpback whale.

Worm Bin Workshop

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

Red wiggler worms make great neighbors! When a bin full of wrigglers moves into your classroom, they turn leftover scraps from lunches and snacks into rich compost for indoor and outdoor plants and gardens. In this workshop, we’ll learn about all kinds of worms, including red wrigglers, and the science behind Vermicomposting. At the end of the program, your group will have its own ready-to-use worm bin and the skills to keep it healthy and productive.

Additional materials fee: $50/bin

Theatre Programs

The Kids on the Block © Puppet Shows

Ideal for grades K to 5

Kids on the Block © is nationwide disability awareness program. In short skits, Bunraku puppets with different abilities, personalities, families and backgrounds help us break down boundaries and accept individual differences. Each program includes two skits; following each skit, students can ask the puppets questions and meet the puppeteers. Each skit explores a different topic related to health, safety or disability. Examples include cerebral palsy, visual impairment and Down syndrome.

Take the Stage

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

We’ll bring a familiar story to life with a series of improvisational theatre games. In this inclusive dramatic experience, everyone has a chance to build confidence and work as a team and take the stage! Create memorable interactive learning experiences that inspire students to think creatively, work cooperatively and make connections. Teachers and students will become familiar with process drama techniques that are versatile and easy to apply in the classroom. Choose from the following featured stories: The Three Little PigsWhere the Wild Things Are; and Cinderella.

[/showhide]

[showhide type="links" more_text="School Group Outreach Programs  - Click for More Information" less_text="Hide Information"]

School Group Programs (Outreach)

Outreach Programs

Meet Istar the whale!

The Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine can come to you! Outreach programs and performances bring the Museum & Theatre’s resources and expertise directly to your school.

The cost for an outreach program is $100 per program (exceptions noted in blue), plus mileage. There is a two program minimum beyond 10 miles and a three program minimum beyond 25 miles of the Museum & Theatre. Programs can accommodate a maximum of 25 students unless otherwise noted.

Reservations: To book an Outreach Program please begin by clicking the link below to submit your program request. A staff member will contact you to confirm that your requested time is available, arrange the details of your program and process payment.

Please note: We frequently revise our school programs to ensure a high quality experience for students and educators. If you have booked a program in the past and you want to be sure that specific features are still included, please discuss your expectations at the time of booking.

OUTREACH PROGRAMS FROM THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM & THEATRE OF MAINE

Arts, Science and Culture

Maine Animal Adaptations

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 3

Discover an array of Maine animal adaptations using drama and real artifacts from the Museum & Theatre’s collection. Compare the natural abilities and limitations of a variety of animals – even humans! Handle amazing animal artifacts like a moose antler, a turtle shell, mammal teeth, skulls and furs.

Prehistoric Fossil Detectives

Ideal for grades K to 5

What is a fossil, and what can it tell us? Experience the life of a fossil through dramatic play, and then explore our collection of prehistoric fossil replicas to determine which creatures they once belonged to. You’ll get to touch and examine real replicas of dinosaur fossils!

Recycle Challenge

Ideal for grades K to 5

Reduce, reuse, recycle! We’ll explore these important conservation concepts in all sorts of playful ways. Have a recycle relay race, witness amazing recycling transformations and discover nature’s own recyclers.

Rock Cycle

Ideal for grades K to 5

Geology, art and mystery converge when we uncover the three stages of the rock cycle. Build your own model rock from scratch to learn how rocks compose our earth and discover all the ways they are part of our daily lives. Work in teams to explore mysterious situations and identify rocks, gems or fossils. View, touch and investigate rock and mineral specimens from the Museum & Theatre’s collection.

Simple Machines

Ideal for grades K to 5

When you use simple machines to solve silly problems, you earn superhero powers! Learn how to find practical solutions to real world problems and make work easier by rotating through six simple machine model stations.

StarLab: The Science of Constellations

Ideal for grades K to 5

What is a star made of? How did the ancients use the stars like a compass? Learn about the intersection between science and culture by observing the night sky in our mini planetarium. We’ll also analyze a set of stars and make up our own constellation myth. Choose a cultural theme: Greek, Navajo/Dine* or Chinese.

Navajo/Dine available September-March only ($125)

The Story of Istar the Whale

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 2

Using large format illustrated story cards we’ll share the life story of Istar, a real humpback whale who lives in the Atlantic Ocean. Learn about her daily routine, including what she eats, the places she travels, and who she spends her time with. After learning about this famous whale’s life, we’ll go inside an inflatable 45 foot, life-size replica of her body.

This program requires a large space such as a gymnasium or cafeteria. Istar can be inflated outdoors, but the interior cannot be accessed during outdoor use. ($150)

We Are Maine: Explore India

Ideal for grades K to 5

Learn about India through the eyes of Jaharanara, a real child in Maine who has Indian family roots. You’ll explore aspects of Indian culture with your senses. We’ll smell aromatic spices, listen to Bollywood music and even learn to write a word in Hindi.

Whale Science

Ideal for grades 1 to 5

Compare and contrast the size of whale intestine, vertebrae and brain to those of a human. Discover differences between whales and dolphins by investigating real whale baleen. Learn about the many ways humpback whales travel through and adapt to their environments in order to survive. Then take a trip inside of Istar, our life-size inflatable humpback whale.
This program requires a large space such as a gymnasium or cafeteria. Istar can be inflated outdoors, but the interior cannot be accessed during outdoor use. ($150)

Worm Bin Workshop

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

Red wiggler worms make great neighbors! When a bin full of wrigglers moves into your classroom, they turn leftover scraps from lunches and snacks into rich compost for indoor and outdoor plants and gardens. In this workshop, we’ll learn about all kinds of worms, including red wrigglers, and the science behind Vermicomposting. At the end of the program, your group will have its own ready-to-use worm bin and the skills to keep it healthy and productive.

Additional materials fee: $50/bin

Theatre Programs

The Kids on the Block© Puppet Shows

Ideal for grades K to 5
Kids on the Block © is nationwide disability awareness program. In short skits, Bunraku puppets with different abilities, personalities, families and backgrounds help us break down boundaries and accept individual differences. Each program includes two skits; following each skit, students can ask the puppets questions and meet the puppeteers. Each skit explores a different topic related to health, safety or disability. Examples include cerebral palsy, visual impairment and Down syndrome.

No maximum number of students

Stories of Kindness

Ideal for grades 2 to 5

One of the most effective ways to combat bullying is to celebrate kindness. With playback theatre – a simple improvisational theatre technique – we can use movement, sound and our own unique voices to reflect our best experiences and share stories of kindness. This program was developed with the help of nationally recognized anti-bullying expert Stan Davis as part of Youth Voices, a project dedicated to encouraging resiliency and celebrating positive peer experiences.

Take the Stage

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

We’ll bring a familiar story to life with a series of improvisational theatre games. In this inclusive dramatic experience, everyone has a chance to build confidence and work as a team and take the stage! Create memorable interactive learning experiences that inspire students to think creatively, work cooperatively and make connections. Teachers and students will become familiar with process drama techniques that are versatile and easy to apply in the classroom. Choose from the following featured stories: The Three Little PigsWhere the Wild Things Are or Cinderella.

[/showhide]

BOOKING A VISIT TO THE MUSEUM

Reservations
Group reservations must be confirmed with a Museum & Theatre staff person at least 24 hours in advance. Please begin by clicking the appropriate link below to submit your group reservation request. A staff member will contact you to confirm that your requested time is available, arrange the details of your visit and process payment.

Click here to complete an online request form for a Group Visit.
Click here to complete an online request form for a Group Visit with a Program.
FMI call 207-828-1234 x232 or email shana@kitetails.org

Schedule
Schedule a two-hour visit on Tuesday through Friday (9am-5pm).
Click here for programs available during the school year.
Click here for programs available during summer vacation.

Group Size
Groups of 10 or more are eligible for group admission rates.

Rates
$6 per person for a two hour visit to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own!
$7 per person for a two hour visit with a program: visit includes time to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own.

Two adults per 10 children are admitted free. Payment can be made on the day of the visit. Checks, credit cards and purchase orders are accepted.

Special Offer!
Receive $0.50 off each admission when your group visits in September, October, January or February.

During our programs, our educators share a variety of scientific and cultural resources with your group, encouraging hands-on learning, discovery and engagement.

We frequently revise our programs to ensure a high quality experience for students and educators. If you have booked a program in the past and you want to be sure that specific features are still included, please discuss your expectations at the time of booking.


THEATRE PERFORMANCES FOR GROUPS

Group Size
Groups of 10 or more are eligible for group ticket rates.
Groups up to 65 total adults and children may book a theatre performance.

Rates
Advance payment is required for theatre productions.
$7 per person for a 45 minute performance
$13 per person for a 45 minute performance plus play time: visit includes time to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own.
$400 to book a private show (1 month advance payment required; additional play time not included; audience max of 65)

This season’s theatre productions can be found on the Our Season page.

Chicago History Museum.jpg
1601 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60614, United States

Chicago History Museum

The Chicago History Museum stands at the crossroads of America’s past and its future. If you live in Chicago or visit here and are curious about the city’s past, present, and future, the Museum should be your first stop.

Your History Lives Here

The Chicago History Museum cares for, showcases, and interprets millions of authentic pieces of Chicago and U.S. history. Our ability to illuminate the past is a reminder of what really happened once upon a time, sheds light on the present, and compellingly informs the future.

We invite you to engage with our stories and make history yourself.

School Field Trips: Chicago History Museum

The Chicago History Museum proudly presents fun-filled, content-rich experiences for students from pre-K to grade 12. Our free field trips align with state and national learning standards.

Book a field trip to visit our original exhibitions. Utilize an audio tour written and performed by local teenagers. Prepare for or follow up on your visit with Great Chicago Stories and our other online resources.

We look forward to welcoming you to the Chicago History Museum.

Your Field Trip Experience

What will my students do? What will my students see?

There’s a lot to do, see, and learn at the Chicago History Museum!

During field trips, teachers and chaperones lead their groups on self-guided experiences through the Museum’s exhibitions. We encourage groups to explore our galleries at their own pace and stop at student-friendly activities along the way.

[showhide type="pressrelease" more_text="Engaging Exhibitions" less_text="Hide Information" hidden="yes"]

Engaging Exhibitions for School Groups 

crossroads
Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Exelon Wing

Exhibition: Chicago: Crossroads of America

Explore Chicago’s changing economy, challenging crises, diverse neighborhoods, groundbreaking innovations, and lively cultural scene in six galleries.


Learn more about this exhibition

Location: KPMG and Paul and Katherine Snyder Community Gallery

Exhibition: Vivian Maiers Chicago

Through summer 2013

Come witness the life work of a nanny turned photographer that wowed the world with breathtaking images of everyday life in Urban America. Discover Chicago faces and neighborhoods of the 1950s and 1960s from an entirely new vantage point.


Slideshow

View a selection of Vivian Maier’s photographs on Flickr

Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Skyline Gallery

Exhibition: Magic

Through January 6, 2013

Discover Chicago’s place in American magic. Settle down in the object theater and meet Greta, a little girl who visits a wonderful store hoping to learn a magician’s secrets. Next door, explore a collection of magical artifacts and activities for young magicians that will inspired amazement and delight.


sensing chicago kids
Sensing Chicago

Located in: Konen Family Children’s Gallery

Exhibition: Sensing Chicago

  • Ride a high-wheel bicycle.
  • Hear the Great Chicago Fire.
  • Catch a fly ball at Old Comiskey Park.
  • Smell the city’s past.
  • Be a Chicago-style hot dog.

Did you know that history is beautiful, noisy, rough, stinky, and delicious? In this gallery, students can use their five senses to:

Recommended for grades 3 and 4. Due to the popularity of this gallery, special reservations for a 30 minute time slot are required. Please indicate your interest on the field trip reservation form.


diorama
Imaging Chicago: The Diorama

Location: Taiwani Foundation Diorama Hall

Exhibition: Imagining Chicago: The Diorama

Visit our beloved dioramas to experience the first 100 years of Chicago’s history. Hands-on activities challenge students to look closely at the scenes, find specific details, and put history into a larger context.


abe
Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Sanger P. Robinson Gallery 

Exhibition: Lincoln’s Chicago 

Catch a glimpse of the city Lincoln knew through portraits of his contemporaries and lithographic view of 1860s Chicago.


Abraham Lincoln

This exhibition highlights Lincoln’s election in 1860, his leadership during the Civil War, and his tragic assassination in a series of dramatic windows and audio narration.


Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Kovler Family Lobby

Exhibition: Unexpected Chicago

Through January 6, 2013

What’s the most surprising thing about a collection made up of millions of artifacts? A single artifact! This world-class collection holds the second largest costume collection in the world including clothing and accessories as well as thousands of linear feet of archives and manuscripts that make up the equivalent of forty-nine football fields or twelve Willis Towers. Unexpected Chicago is a way to reveal unexpected treasures of Chicago history a single artifact at a time.


Learn more about this exhibition

Located in: Benjamin Green-Field Gallery

Exhibition: Shalom Chicago

Opens October 21st. 2012

Explore the Jewish community’s rich history and contributions to the city’s growth and development, through personal stories, rare artifacts, and engaging multimedia presentations.


entrance

Exhibition: Treasures

This series of installations promotes exploration throughout the Museum!

  • Imagine riding low and slow in our custom-made, tricked-out 1978 Chevrolet Monte Carlo.
  • Learn about Abraham Lincoln and see his deathbed.
  • Play Street Smarts, a game that challenges students to match events with the intersections where they took place.

Location: Skyline Gallery, Bessie Green-Field Warshawsky Gallery, and Mazza Foundation Gallery

Exhibition: Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair

Opens March 16, 2013

Relive the experience of the Ebony Fashion Fair in this one-of-a-kind exhibition. Explore its fifty-year history, and discover how Eunice Johnson overcame adversity to bring high couture fashion to African American communities, while raising millions of dollars for charities along the way. More than sixty garments, including works by Oscar de la Renta, Christian Dior, Stephen Burrows, Yves Saint Laurent, and Patrick Kelly, help tell the story of this world-renowned fashion show and its redefinition of American beauty.

[/showhide]

[showhide type="links" more_text="School Group Programs Grades 1  to 12th Grade - Click for More Information" less_text="Hide Information"]

Programming for Pre-K to Kindergarten

Crazy for Trains logo

Crazy for Trains

Pre-K – Kindergarten Self-Guided Gallery Experience

Play in the past with two of our biggest artifacts: ‘L’ Car No. 1 and the Pioneer Locomotive.

Crazy for Trains discovery bags are available for use by teachers and chaperones during a Museum visit. The bags help young children explore transportation history through music, role play, and picture books. Use the field trip reservation form to reserve discovery bags for your group.

Each discovery bag includes:

  • One copy of Chugga-Chugga Choo-Choo by Kevin Lewis
  • One copy of Freight Train/Tren de carga by Donald Crews
  • One conductor vest
  • One hole punch
  • Paper tickets for each child
  • Two sets of colored shapes
  • Song lyrics, poems, and pictures
  • Suggestions for how to use the materials during your Museum field trip

Engaging Programming for School Groups Grades 1-12

 


History a la Cart

Engage with History

At History à la Cart stations, students to actively analyze and interpret the past. Facilitated by trained staff and volunteers, these 20-minute hands-on experiences are located throughout our galleries.

Great Chicago Fire Prairie

Grades 3–5

CHMFTBActivityfire The Great Chicago Fire

Use an oversized map, icons, photographs and first-hand accounts to trace the events of October 8–10, 1871, and collaboratively tell the story of the fire.

CHMFTBActivityprairie Prairie Landscape

Measure and mark the height and root depth of native plants. Imagine the vastness of the prairie through images and settlers’ accounts.

CHMFTBActivityskyline Skyscrapers

Imagine living in the famous John Hancock Center. Explore Chicago’s skyscrapers through improvisation and building activities.

CHMFTBActivityartifacts Artifacts

Discover objects through touch and discussion, then bring an adjective into the gallery and choose an artifact that matches it. Draw and write about your object, then share your opinion and find out what others think.

CHMFTBActivityneighborhood Sweet Home Chicago

Welcome to your new home in Chicago! Explore the exhibition Chicago: Crossroads of America, learn all about your city, and work together to create a Mad Lib-style letter about your discoveries.

Bridges Maps floor mat with compass

Grades 3–12

CHMFTBActivitybridge Bridges

Create, construct, and test bridges to discover how they work and why they are so important in Chicago’s history.

CHMFTBActivitymaps Maps

Map Chicago’s history on this one-of-a-kind gallery hunt. Use a compass and geography skills to connect artifacts to locations on a large, eye-catching map.

History à la Cart Schedule

For more flexibility during your visit, all stations are accessible on a first-come, first-served basis.

FTActivityStations

[/showhide]

Enriching the Gallery Experience teenaudiotourlogo2

40-minute experiences for grades 6–12

Cost: 

$2 per iPod, advance reservation required

Use the online field trip reservation form to reserve the audio tour for your group.

In Our Own Words

Developed, written, and performed by Lake View High School students, this tour of Chicago: Crossroads of America features original interviews, vintage music, dialog, and dramatic readings on topics such as the Great Fire, Gangland Chicago, jazz and blues, and the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

You can download the tour to any MP3 player in advance of your visit. Download the In Our Own Words teen audio tour (40 MB) Alternatively, you can reserve the Museum’s iPods for use during your field trip: $2 per iPod; advance reservations required. Make a reservation Use the In Our Own Words teacher discussion guide—before and after your field trip—to expand on the topics, artifacts, issues, and historical arguments presented in the audio tour. Download the In Our Own Words teacher discussion guide

CAF Logo.jpg
224 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL, United States

Chicago Architecture Foundation Exhibitions

Welcome to the Chicago Architecture Foundation! We offer engaging ways for educators, families, and young people to explore Chicago’s amazing architecture.

Through hands-on, real-world explorations discover how to turn your local community into a dynamic setting for teaching and learning.  Buildings, structures, people, and events help young people discover how architecture and the built environment impact their lives everyday.

Our programs and resources include multi-disciplinary teacher workshops, award-winning curricular resources, place-based field trips, hands-on workshops for teens, scout badge programs, and A+DEN-a network for people interested in design education.

The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) offers more than 80 different tours including the Chicago Architecture Foundation architecture river cruise aboard the Chicago’s First Lady. Also offered: FREE exhibitions, programs and workshops, youth education, family programs and an architecture and design-themed retail store.

[showhide type="pressrelease" more_text="School Group Programs Grades 1 - 8" less_text="Hide Information" hidden="yes"]

Field Trips at Chicago Architecture Foundation

(Grades K – 8th)

CAF’s interactive field trips help students in grades K – 8 explore the city and its buildings. Led by volunteer docents who are specially trained to work with young people, these field trips encourage student participation and inquiry and support Illinois Learning Standards.

Join us to explore big ideas in architecture – from columns and cantilevers, to architectural design and the International Style.

– “I really enjoyed learning about cantilevers! I must have walked by thousands of them but I never really appreciated how difficult but beautiful they are! Who invented the cantilevers anyway? I learned so much but still have so much more to learn!” – 3rd grade student

– “Great field trip – looking forward to next year! Can I do this when I retire?” – Chicago public elementary school teacher

School Field Trips Tour s Available

ART IN ARCHITECTURE

Grades K – 8

Buildings are works of art in which we live, work, and learn. How do architects use art to make their buildings distinctive?

Art in Architecture is a 90-minute walking tour designed for students in grades K – 8. The field trip explores how art and architecture intersect in three unique buildings in downtown Chicago: The Art Institute of Chicago, the Harold Washington Library, and the Federal Center. Through guided sketching activities, students investigate architectural and artistic elements at each building.

Field Trip Details

Days and time Weekdays year-round, from 10:15 to 11:45am.

If this time frame does not meet your needs, please contact us about alternate days and times.

Location: Begin at – Chicago Architecture Foundation, Santa Fe Building, 224 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago

End at – Federal Center, at Adams and Dearborn

Duration: 90 minutes

Recommended Grade Level: Grades K – 8

Group Size: 10 to 60 students (1 chaperone is required for every 5 students)

Cost: $4.00 per student

No charge for required chaperones; $4.00 charge for each additional adult.

PICTURING AMERICA

Grades K – 12

Did your school receive one of the 2556 Picturing America image sets sent to Illinois schools from the National Endowment for the Humanities? Are you looking for engaging ways to link this image collection of the nation’s artistic heritage to classroom studies and field trips?

We work with teachers to create interactive field trips linking the Picturing America image collection to Chicago examples by the same artists featured in the collection. Through first-hand explorations, your students will gain a richer understanding of the collection, the artists, and the historical context of these American masterpieces.

Picturing America is a program from the National Endowment for the Humanities in cooperation with the American Library Association.

Contact us for more details Grouptours@Architecture.org

STRUCTURE:

THE SECRET OF SKYSCRAPERS

Grades 3-4

Discover how architects design skyscrapers to stand tall and stay standing!

Structure: The Secret of Skyscrapers is an interactive field trip for Grades 3 – 4 that will help you unlock the structural ‘secrets’ to Chicago’s spectacular skyscrapers.

Through hands-on activities at the Chicago Architecture Foundation you and your students will learn about seven structural elements, like columns, cantilevers, trusses, arches, and domes. You’ll then become structural detectives as you and a CAF docent educator embark on an architectural walking tour to identify structures at work in real buildings in downtown Chicago.

Each group receives a Structure Prep Pack including instructions for pre-and post-visit activities, plus student booklets on the day of the field trip.

– “The docents are extremely knowledgeable, patient, and have a great rapport with my students.  I am always impressed with this trip.” – Teacher, Chicago

– “I really enjoyed learning about cantilevers! I must have walked by thousands of them but I never really appreciated how difficult but beautiful they are! Who invented the cantilevers anyway? I learned so much but still have so much more to learn!” – 3rd grade student, Chicago

Field Trip Details

Days and time

Weekdays year-round, from 10:15 to 11:45am.

If this time frame does not meet your needs, please contact us about alternate days and times.

Location: Begin at – Chicago Architecture Foundation, Santa Fe Building, 224 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago

End at – 190 South LaSalle (corner of Adams and LaSalle)

Duration: 90 minutes

Recommended grade level: Grades 3 – 4

Group size: 10 to 60 students (1 chaperone is required for every 5 students)

Cost: $4.00 per student

No charge for required chaperones; $4.00 charge for each additional adult.

THE STUDENT LOOP TOUR

Grades 5 – 8

What can you learn from buildings? What stories do they tell?

Are your students curious about the city and eager to learn about its history and architecture? The Student Loop Tour is a field trip designed for students in grades 5 through 8 (scout troops and clubs are welcome). This walking tour of Chicago’s Loop pairs 10 significant buildings with 10 architectural themes to help students learn about Chicago’s amazing architecture and take home new skills for understanding how the built environment impacts them each day.

– This is the best field trip I have been to in years.  – Teacher, Chicago suburb

 I loved seeing all the different buildings and learning the history and connection behind them. I have lived in Chicago my whole life and before today I knew absolutely nothing about our architecture or how diverse it is!  – 7th grade student, Chicago

Each group receives a Teacher Prep Pack, which includes instructions for pre- and post-visit activities and a CD-ROM with color images of tour buildings, plus student booklets on the day of the field trip.

  • Santa Fe Building
  • CNA Center
  • Building
  • DePaul Center
  • Harold Washington Library
  • Old Colony Building
  • Fisher Building
  • Monadnock Building
  • Federal Center
  • Marquette Building

[/showhide]


[showhide type="links" more_text="School Group Programs Grades 9 to 12 - Click for More Information" less_text="Hide Information"]

Field Trips at Chicago Architecture Foundation

(Grades 9th – 12th)

HIGH SCHOOL TOURS

By foot, boat or bus CAF tours are great ways for your high school group to learn and appreciate the past, present and future of Chicago’s world-renowned architecture. Your students can embrace the power of the skyscrapers and the beauty of Chicago while the most knowledgeable docents entertain them with stories of the men and women who built America’s greatest architecture.Choose from one of our four tour offerings below.

Interested in an experience not listed here?

Offers over 85 tours that can be customized to fit your classroom’s special interest. Call the Group Tours Department for more information today! 312.922.3432 x226


boat.jpg

Student Architecture River Cruise – 60 minutes

Join the Chicago Architecture Foundation and Chicago’s First Lady Cruises for an interpretive architectural river cruise specially designed for students grades 7-12. This tour features many of Chicago’s best known buildings from the unique vantage point of the Chicago River, described by our trained and certified volunteer docents. Students will connect architecture, design, engineering, urban planning, and history to enhance their understanding and appreciation of Chicago’s remarkable cultural legacy.


Historic and Modern Combo Walking Tour – 120 minutes

Chicago is widely regarded as the center of early skyscraper innovation and also a world capital of Modern architecture! On this tour your students will learn the stories behind some of the world’s earliest skyscrapers and also gain a unique perspective on the most notable examples of contemporary buildings and styles.


marina.jpg

Skyscraper Express Bus Tour – 105 minutes

Students will enjoy unique perspectives of the city as they see Grant Park, the Museum Campus, Millennium Park and Chicago’s expansive downtown parks plus emerging residential neighborhoods and commercial development. Your class will understand the impact of Lake Michigan, the Chicago River, the railroads and public transportation systems on the growth of the city, and we will have a chance to get off the bus to view the world-famous skyline that defines Chicago as a vibrant center for architecture.


Skyscraper Walk through Time – 60 minutes

Chicago is known for building some of the world’s first skyscrapers, but how have their designs and technologies changed over time? This one hour walk through the Loop showcases several classic buildings – from 1872 to the present. See how architects adapted building styles to meet the fashions of their era and used cutting-edge engineering to build taller than before!

[/showhide]


[showhide type="typeA" more_text="Current Exhibitions" less_text="Hide Information" hidden="yes"]

<

p style=”text-align: center;”>Chicago Architecture Foundation Exhibitions

Current Exhibitions Available by CFA

Chicago Architecture Foundation exhibitions encourage people to discover the spaces, places, and structures that shape Chicago and all communities. The unique installations encourage people to understand how architects, engineers, and planners design environments—and how we all participate. The exhibitions inspire people to imagine the future of metropolitan regions everywhere.

Learn more about this exhibition>>

THE UNSEEN CITY:

DESIGNS FOR A FUTURE CHICAGO

COST: Free and open to the public

HOURS: Daily 9 am to 5:30 pm

LOCATION: Atrium Gallery, 224 S. Michigan Ave.

Four Chicago academic institutions present visions for the future of city life in the Chicago Architecture Foundation’s exhibition Unseen City: Designs for a Future Chicago. The participating designers encourage us to ask, “What might this neighborhood and city become?”

Come see a 19th century boulevard transformed for the 21st, a horizontal deconstructed Willis Tower, an industrial district as creative hub, and a skyscraper that scrubs the air.

What future do you imagine for your neighborhood?

  Learn more about this exhibition>> 

COST

Free and open to the public

HOURS: 

7 days a week from 9:30 am – 5:00 pm

LOCATION :

CAF Lecture Hall, 224 S. Michigan Ave.

Chicago is preparing to debut a bold plan for giving public transit riders a speedier and smarter way to ride: Bus Rapid Transit (BRT). By combining cutting-edge technology with specially-chosen routes, BRT promises to make Chicago a more connected city.

This exhibition outlines the features and benefits of BRT while exploring how it is transforming cities around the globe. See how features like dedicated bus lanes and innovative station design are improving bus transportation and people’s lives.

These programs are made possible through the generous support of The Rockefeller Foundation, in partnership with The Chicago Community Trust.

 

Loop Value: The How Much Does It Cost? Shop

Learn more about this exhibition>>

COST: 

Free and open to the public

HOURS: 

7 days a week from 9:30 am – 5:00 pm

LOCATION:

Arcelor Mittal CitySpace Gallery, 224 South Michigan Ave.

In a nation obsessed with acquiring the most stuff at the lowest price, how well do we understand the value of the buildings and products we buy? How do our purchases impact the future of our neighborhoods? Visit Loop Value: The How Much Does It Cost? Shop at the Chicago Architecture Foundation and find a new design for your city and your life. It’s a shopping trip unlike any you’ve experienced before.

CMCttl.jpg

Learn more about the Chicago model>>

COST: 

Free and open to the public

HOURS: 

7 days a week from 9am-6:30pm

LOCATION: 

Atrium Gallery, 224 South Michigan Avenue

Chicago Model City is the only accurate and up-to-date three-dimensional portrait of Chicago’s downtown. This 320-square-foot work-in-progress enables you to see Chicago as you’ve never seen it before. The model became an instant icon when it opened in 2009, beloved by tourists and locals alike. It has become the centerpiece for exhibitions in the Chicago Architecture Foundation’s atrium gallery. In addition, the model is the departure point for CAF tours, a gathering place, an orientation point for visitors, and a great photo opportunity! Famous visitors to the model include Mayor Richard J. Daley, architect Jeanne Gang, and television personality Geoffrey Baer. CAF is currently developing exhibitions that will make Chicago Model City a richer and even more exciting experience.

[/showhide]

Penn State Performing Arts.png
Eisenhower Auditorium University Park, PA 16802

Join us for the 2013–2014 season of the Center for the Performing Arts School-Time Matinee series — a laboratory of live theatre!

We encourage you to integrate the arts into your classroom, particularly as related to the performance you and your students are attending.

Because we know your classroom time is precious, we have provided teaching materials and pointed out subject area connections that follow the Pennsylvania Academic Standards and the Pennsylvania departments of Education and Public Welfare Learning Standards for Early Childhood. By bringing students to our performances and accessing teaching materials, your district is allowed to report 3.5 ACT 48 professional development hours. Teaching materials and ACT 48 documentation will be available on this website one month before each School-Time Matinee. School contacts will be notified via e-mail when they become available.

Under general information, you’ll find reservation details and field trip funding ideas, including a busing subsidy application sponsored, in part, by the Bill and Honey Jaffe Endowment. For those wishing to extend their stay at Penn State after the matinee, under Extend Your Visit we provide suggestions for other must-do activities. For performances for grades K-3, Show and Tell has information about the performance for parents to reference when asking children about their day. Show and Tell will be available on this website one month before each School-Time Matinee. Thank you for directing parents to this site.

By bringing your students to a live performing arts experience, you are giving them the gifts of broadened perspective and experiential learning. 

2013–2014 MATINEES

Please Click above for information regarding Programming and Events the Center for Performing Arts at Penn State as the schedule changes often.

[showhide type="links" more_text="Field Trip Funding - Click for More Information" less_text="Hide Information"]

FIELD TRIP FUNDING

Making the Case to Your Funders

The School-Time Matinee series at the Center for the Performing Arts enhances in-class learning.

School-Time Matinees:

  • Allow educators to engage students with a living laboratory — the performing arts;
  • Incorporate Pennsylvania State Education Standards to help educators further in-class educational goals;
  • Provide experiential learners with ways to engage with core curriculum areas;
  • Introduce youth to the performing arts at a fraction of the cost of public performances;
  • Are educational and fun for you and your students.

Two excellent websites, Americans for the Arts and National Guild for Community Arts Education provide more resources to help you explain to funders, parent-teacher organizations, and principals the reasons you want to take your students to experience a School-Time Matinee.

Transportation Subsidy Available

The Honey and Bill Jaffe Endowment for Audience Development and the Center for the Performing Arts are pleased to offer a limited busing subsidy to assist your school with transportation costs for School-Time Matinees. Ask for details when you make your reservation with Shannon Arney at 814-863-2688 or via email.

Please download, print, compete, and return the busing subsidy request form, to the address provided on the form, two weeks prior to the date of the performance.

Target Field Trip Grants

Go to Target. Applications are accepted beginning August 1 for the 2013–2014 grants. Each grant is valued up to $700. Target accepts grant applications between noon CST August 1 and noon CST September 30.

[/showhide]

Bruce Museum.jpg
1 Museum Drive, Greenwich, CT, United States

Sitting high on a hill overlooking Greenwich Harbor, the Bruce Museum offers a changing array of exhibitions and educational programs that promote the understanding and appreciation of art and science.

The Bruce Museum has been voted the best museum in Fairfield County for the past five years, a recognition of its growing popularity and efforts to consistently address new subjects of remarkable beauty or great interest with new insights, The Bruce plays an integral role in the cultural life of area residents and attracts approximately 100,000 visitors annually, reaching out to families, seniors, students, the handicapped, at-risk children, and community organizations. The Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut, presents more than a dozen new exhibitions in art and science every year.

Consistently voted the “Best Museum” by area media, the Bruce Museum is a regionally based, world-class institution highlighting art, science and natural history in more than a dozen changing exhibitions annually. The permanent galleries feature the natural sciences that encompass regional to global perspectives.

[showhide type="pressrelease" more_text="Museum Based Programming" less_text="Hide Information" hidden="yes"]

Museum-Based School Programs

Consider the Bruce Museum an annex to your classroom. Our collections and inquiry-based STEAM programs are the perfect way to complement and enrich your day-to-day practice. The hands –on interaction of “touching” objects and “exploring” collections can enhance a child’s understanding of scientific phenomena and artistic creation while also allowing them to make important connections between the sciences and humanities. Our workshops are thematic and designed to give children maximum exposure to both scientific and artistic concepts and processes.

Museum-based programs are available for school and after-school groups. To learn how to schedule a visit, click here.

For more information about Museum-Based Programs please contact Kathleen D’Aquila, Manager of School and Tour Services, kdaquila@brucemuseum.org or (203) 413-6741.

Woodland Indian Life (PreK – 6th grade)

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live in Connecticut or New York when only the Native Americans lived here? What did the land look like? How did people eat, sleep and survive? Travel back in time with us to explore the natural environment of our region over 600 years ago. Students will explore: natural history, ecology, Native culture and early engineering.

Animal Adaptations (PreK – 5th grade)

Animals are amazing! They have evolved over time to use their covering, color and physical structure to adapt, camouflage, survive, and escape danger. Through a study of animal pelts and animal mounts, students will explore the different ways that vertebrates (mammals, reptiles, fish and birds) use their adaptations to survive in various environments. The workshop also introduces students to the concepts of patterns and classification.

I Am an Archaeologist (2nd – 5th grade)

How do archaeologists work? What kinds of artifacts do they collect and why? How do they interpret artifacts? Students take part in an archeological “dig” of a Woodland Indian site and use critical thinking and communication skills as they work in teams, recording and interpreting artifacts. This program complements “Woodland Indian Life.” A discount is offered when both are requested for the same school group.

Coastal Ecology (PreK – middle school)

The Long Island Sound is home to numerous remarkable creatures. This marine ecosystem right outside our door teaches us not only about natural history and biology, but also aquatic ecology and invertebrate structure and function. Dive into a comparative study of the invertebrates that populate the Sound by exploring our marine tank. The workshop also increases student familiarity with categorization, animal classification, and interdependence through the study of food chains and webs.

Mineral Marvels (3rd – 5th grade)

What is a mineral? Where are they found and what can we learn from them? Our expansive collection of minerals and rocks invites children into a deep exploration of these important abiotic members of our environment. Students will utilize the scientific process to examine properties of minerals and how they are classified.

Butterflies (PreK – 2nd grade)

Who hasn’t stopped to watch butterflies fly by? These beautiful creatures are a wonderful way to explore insect structure and function. In this workshop, we use games and art to invite students into the world of butterflies, examining their body structure, life cycle, and symmetrical decorative patterns.

[/showhide]

[showhide type="links" more_text="Temporary Exhibitions - Related Programs - Click for More Information" less_text="Hide Information"]

A tour or interactive art program may be developed to focus on any of the Museum’s changing exhibitions. All Museum-based programs feature inquiry-based learning, hands-on activities, and connections to school curricula. All programs are 60 minutes in length.

September 28, 2013 to January 26, 2014

Closer: The Graphic Art of Chuck Close

With a body of work composed almost entirely of portraits, Chuck Close has been investigating the mechanics of vision for more than four decades. The fluidity of his approach, and the intensity of his engagement with each of his print forays makes Close an exemplary figure of the post-war New York art world. Organized with the participation of the artist himself and supplemented with loans from local collectors and Bruce Museum supporters, Closer: The Graphic Art of Chuck Close will present the finest and most intriguing examples of this great modern master’s oeuvre.

November 2, 2013 to March 23, 2014

Oysters, Pearls of Long Island Sound

Found in estuaries around the world, oysters are a favored delicacy for humans and play a valuable role in ecosystems and economies. These unassuming mollusks have sustained Native Americans, cleaned polluted harbors, provided critical habitat, and created waterside cultures. The exhibition will feature hands-on interactive displays, videos, and historical objects that appeal to all ages.

December 14, 2013 to March 9, 2014

Inside the Artist’s Studio: Small-scale Views 

This exhibition celebrates a three-decade long Bruce Museum holiday tradition of exhibiting “small scale” constructions, with a focus on artists looking at artists. Exhibited are Richard Haas (b. 1939), Joe Fig (b. 1968), and Lori Nix’s (b. 1969) own individual investigations and analyses of the creative process in three-dimensional miniature constructions as well as in painting, printmaking, and photography.

January 25, 2014 to April 13, 2014

In the Dark: Animal Survival Strategies

In this immersive, entertaining, and family-friendly exhibition, people of all ages will discover how animals adapt to living in the dark. The show features natural dioramas of caves, deep soil, nighttime forest and desert, along with mechanical, electronic and digital interactives. This exhibition is organized by the Cincinnati Museum Center.

February 1, 2014 to June 1, 2014

Ed Clark: American Photojournalist

Ed Clark (1911-2000) was the quintessential American news photographer who covered the personalities and events that shaped the Golden Age of print media. Lauded during his lifetime for the telling details and emotional drama of his imagery, this exhibition revisits the life and work of this legendary cameraman.

March 22, 2014 to June 21, 2014

Pasture to Pond: Connecticut Impressionism

At the turn of the twentieth century there was a concentration of artists working in Connecticut in the newly imported style of the French Impressionists. These artists, who came of age in a rapidly industrializing world, sought a more intimate, bucolic and orderly landscape. This exhibition speaks to the quality and beauty of this perennially popular art.

April 5, 2014 to November 2, 2014

Extreme Habitats: Into the Deep Sea

The exhibition explores the vast and extraordinary deep sea habitats by examining both the highly adapted survival strategies utilized by creatures of the deep and the technology that enables researchers to record ground-breaking observations.

[/showhide]

[showhide type=”typeA” more_text=”Brucemobile Programs- Click Here” less_text=”Close Distance Learning” hidden=”yes”]

The Brucemobile is an educational outreach program that travels to classrooms, like a field trip in reverse! Programs are available during and after school.

Brucemobile Programs are:

  • Developmentally appropriate
  • Interactive
  • Hands-on/minds-on
  • Inquiry-based

All Brucemobile Programs feature Museum objects.

Programs are offered to schools within a 25-mile radius of the Museum.

To learn how to schedule a visitclick here.

For more information on the following Brucemobile Programs, please see ourActivities and Lesson Plans. There you will find background information, curriculum connections, classroom activities, and further resources for each of these programs.

For further questions about Brucemobile programs, please contact Peter Linderoth, Manager of Outreach Education, plinderoth@brucemuseum.org or 203-413-6742.

Click to view programs for

Grades Pre-K through 5th
Middle and High School
After School Brucemobile

School Programs for Pre-K through 5th grade:

Pre-school Programs are 30 minutes.

Class size is limited to:

  • 15 children for 3 year olds
  • 20 children for 4 year olds

Kindergarten through 5th-grade Programs are 1 hour.

  • Class size is limited to 25 students.
Program Grades
Pre-K K – 2 3 – 5
 Woodland Indian Life X X X
 Crusty Crabs/ Coastal
Ecology
X X X
 Shapes and Patterns X
 Animals in My Backyard/
Animal Adaptations
X X
 Butterflies X X
 Dinosaurs X
 Desert Ecology X
 Rock Detectives X
 Skeletons X

Program Descriptions

Woodland Indian Life 
Native American artifacts and reproductions are used to help recreate the life of a Woodland Indian family before colonial contact.

Crusty Crabs/ Coastal Ecology 
Through careful, hands-on observation of live crabs and other small seashore animals, children learn about the structure and characteristics of crabs and other crustaceans, and their place in the seashore community and the food web.

Shapes and Patterns
Children will define 5 basic shapes, find shapes in natural objects from museum collections, and create patterns and symmetry. Pattern activity included

Animals in my Backyard/ Animal Adaptations
Different body coverings, colors and physical structures help vertebrates adapt to their environment, find food and escape from predators. Students learn these concepts while handling fur pelts and mounted mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish.

Butterflies 
Students explore symmetry in nature while learning about the structure of butterflies and insects. The life cycle, adaptations, habitats, and camouflage patterns of butterflies and insects are also introduced. Museum specimens and photographs create a visually comprehensive classroom experience

Dinosaurs
Fossilized dinosaur bones, teeth, footprints, and other parts are used by students to reconstruct the size, food preferences, and movement of these ‘terrible lizards’. Comparison is made between dinosaurs and modern animals. Through observation and comparison, students become paleontologists, conducting their own fossil dig.

Desert Ecology
Students investigate the properties of a desert ecosystem and discuss special adaptations of the animals and plants that inhabit these areas. Experimentation and handling Museum specimens provide hands-on activities for the students

Rock Detectives
This program allows students to observe demonstrations of the geologic processes that cause the rock cycle, and even become a part of the rock cycle themselves! Rock samples, demonstrations of Pangaea and plate tectonics, and interactive activities encourage students to use their hands and minds to explore earth’s dynamic processes. As their final element of detective work, students will act as geologists working in teams to deduce where their rock came from in the earth, how it formed, and what type of rock it is.

Skeletons
Students will identify the location and purpose of major bones in humans and animals and develop related vocabulary. Through discussion, demonstration and hands-on activities, students will distinguish between endoskeletons and exoskeletons and describe the functions of a skeleton. Students will dissect owl pellets to uncover and identify rodent bones.

Middle School and High School

Classroom Programs are one hour in length.

Prehistoric Peoples 
Award-winning, traveling exhibition presented by instructors from the Archaeological Associates of Greenwich (AAG) enables students to handle authentic prehistoric tools while learning about the progress of humankind from 4 million to 5,000 years ago. Slides and artifacts stress ancient peoples’ adaptations to their changing environment. Slide projector and world map required.

Egypt 
Instructors from the Archaeological Associates of Greenwich (AAG) offer stories behind the fabled pyramids, kings and queens of ancient Egypt’s Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms. Sites and artifacts are shown with emphasis on the life of young people. Adaptation to the harsh desert environment is stressed.

Assembly Programs are one hour in length, and can accommodate up to a full auditorium.
Fee: $195 per program.
Slide projector required

Note: Subjects can be customized to fit curriculum needs.

After-School Brucemobile Series

Students will be led through hands-on and conceptual lesson plans by an experienced Bruce Museum Instructor. Afterschool Series incorporate more activities and crafts than traditional classroom programs, as is appropriate to the afterschool setting. After-School Brucemobile Programs are available in a series of 4, 6, or 8 sessions.

Habitats: the World Around Us (Grades 2-5)
Habitats: The World Around Us introduces students to the earth’s diverse habitats. They will compare and contrast the regional Long Island Sound and Woodland habitats, examining how animals and humans live and survive in these environments as well as exploring the consequences of acts of nature and humans on these ecosystems. Students will have the opportunity to model life in the intertidal zone, simulate the impacts and clean up efforts of an oil spill, perform skits of animal’s behaviors in all seasons, and act as archaeologists to examine Native American artifacts. In culmination of their work, each student will create a snow globe diorama of his or her favorite habitat, incorporating the themes discussed throughout the program.

Artist’s Workshop (Grades 2-5)
The Artist’s Workshop exposes students to a wide range of artistic styles and techniques. Each of the sessions is directly related to exhibitions currently or previously on view at the Bruce Museum (sessions are subject to change based on the Museum’s exhibition schedule). Students will have the opportunity to closely examine reproductions of famous works of art, learn about different artistic styles and historical periods, and experiment with relevant artistic techniques.

Nature Adventure Series (Grades K-5)
The Nature Adventure Series offers an exciting series of programs with a central focus of exploring the many concepts of the natural world! This series covers the broadest range of topics of our afterschool selections. Children will step into the shoes of a paleontologist and study dinosaurs; get hands-on experiences with live animals from the Long Island Sound; discover the different skeletal structures animals have adapted; learn about local bird species and what they eat through an always popular owl pellet dissection; and many more fascinating sessions. This series can be tailored to the center’s needs.
For more information on Brucemobile Outreach Programs, please contact Peter Linderoth, Manager of Outreach Education, at 203-413-6742, or plinderoth@brucemuseum.org.

To make a reservation for a Brucemobile Outreach Program, please contact Julia Harrington, Museum Educator and Reservations Manager, at jharrington@brucemuseum.org or 203-413-6744 or click on How to Schedule.

[/showhide]

Boston Symphony Orchestra.jpg
301 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA, United States

Now in its 134th season, the Boston Symphony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert on October 22, 1881, and has continued to uphold the vision of its founder, the businessman, philanthropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur musician Henry Lee Higginson, for well over a century. The Boston Symphony Orchestra has performed throughout the United States, as well as in Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, South America, and China; in addition, it reaches audiences numbering in the millions through its performances on radio, television, and recordings.

The BSO’S 2012-13 Season continues the orchestra’s extraordinary 132-year tradition of presenting the very best of the classical music world by spotlighting the virtuosic talents of BSO Musicians along with an internationally acclaimed roster of conductors and guest soloists.

[showhide type="links" more_text="School Group Visits and Visit Types - Click for More Information" less_text="Hide Information"]

Geared toward students in grades 4-6, these concerts act as an introduction to the full orchestra experience, encouraging long-term ownership of orchestral music and the BSO, and delivering positive character development messages through each performance led by Germeshausen Family and Youth Concerts Conductor Thomas Wilkins.

The BSO offers six Youth Concerts per year, one of which is presented exclusively and free of charge for students in the Boston Public Schools. Germeshausen Family and Youth Concerts Conductor Thomas Wilkins leads each performance from stage, guiding the audience through The concert experience and delivering age-appropriate messages about character in conjunction with the concert program. Classroom teachers have access to information online that allows them to incorporate the concert experience and repertoire into their regular curriculum.

Thanks to the generous support of Arbella Insurance Foundation, sponsor of the BSO’s Youth and Family Concerts, a limited amount of funding has been set aside to partially subsidize the costs of bus transportation to and from Symphony Hall for schools attending 2014 BSO Youth Concerts. Please visit:http://www.arbella.com/BSOBus for more details and for application information.

Pre- and Post-Concert BSO Musician Demonstrations

Prior to and following each BSO Youth Concert, a limited number of instrument demonstrations led by BSO musicians will be offered to attending school groups of 100 or less individuals. The demonstrations are intended to build personal connections between participating school groups and BSO musicians, offering an opportunity for students to hear directly from a BSO musician on the day of the Youth Concert performance.

Pre-concert demonstrations will take place from 9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. (available for schools attending the 10:30 a.m. concerts)

Post-concert demonstrations will take place from 1:10 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. (available for schools attending the 12:00 p.m. concerts)

Please note that there is very limited space for these demonstrations – as such, requests will be honored on a first come, first served basis. Application is required for consideration. Please download an application here.

[/showhide]

[showhide type="pressrelease" more_text="Current Programming Offerings" less_text="Hide Information" hidden="yes"]

THE BSO CLASSROOM CONNECTIONS PROGRAM PROVIDES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH HIGH QUALITY MUSICAL PERFORMANCES THAT OFFER PARTICIPATING STUDENTS THE OPPORTUNITY TO ENGAGE WITH A RANGE OF BSO MUSICIANS WHO THE STUDENTS SEE ONSTAGE DURING A BSO YOUTH CONCERT AT SYMPHONY HALL.

Taking the form of ensemble performances in informal settings for small groups, the BSO Classroom Connections program creates meaningful interactive experiences for students and musicians that will cultivate students’ knowledge and relationship with orchestral music and BSO players.

[BSO Education]

A limited number of BSO Classroom Connections visits are available by competitive application to elementary school classrooms to serve as an additional resource for music specialists and general classroom teachers in their efforts to incorporate orchestral music into their schools. The BSO Classroom Connections program partners with a limited number of elementary school classrooms each season between January and May to present a free chamber ensemble performance in support of the current curriculum. Applications will be weighed against each other based on consideration of geographic equity and the fit between available ensembles and the curricular needs of applying classrooms. Performances will be offered to schools who are committed to attending the 2014 Youth Concerts at Symphony Hall, and will offer either a concert preparation or extension opportunity for schools, based on the full orchestra concert experience.

[/showhide]

Atlanta Cyclorama Logo.png
Atlanta Cyclorama & Civil War Museum, Cherokee Avenue Southeast, Atlanta, GA, United States

Take a stirring journey through time in Atlanta’s Cyclorama. Sit at the center of a sweeping panorama of the Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864, during the American Civil War.

On that day Confederate troops led by General John B. Hood made a desperate attempt to save Atlanta from the encircling Union armies. They were initially successful, but the Union troops, led by Major General William T. Sherman, regained positions lost earlier in the day and won the battle. By nightfall, more than 12,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing.

The Cyclorama painting — 42 feet tall and 358 feet in circumference — is said to be the largest painting in the world. It offers breathtaking realism enhanced by a foreground of three-dimensional figures and terrain. The presentation is accompanied by music and narration, available in five languages.

When you visit the Cyclorama in Atlanta’s Grant Park you can also see artifacts of the war displayed in the Civil War Museum and a steam locomotive known as the Texas, a veteran of the Great Locomotive Chase of 1862.

School Group Programs Available (Grades 1 to 8)

[showhide type="links" more_text="School Group Programs - Click for More Information" less_text="Hide Information"]

School Field Trips (Grades 1-8) The Atlanta Cyclorama

Give your Students a School field Trip back in history as they take a stirring journey through time in Atlanta’s Cyclorama. Sit at the center of a sweeping panorama of the Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864, during the American Civil War. The Atlanta Cyclorama offers a unique inside look into the past of Atlanta Georgia in time of Civil War. A School Field trip to the Atlanta Cyclorama offers a panoramic presentation of the Battle of Atlanta with authentic military artifacts from the period.  Students on their School field trip will also have the opportunity to see and understand the past of the Civil war through a number of different mediums offered by the Atlanta Cyclorama.

Tour Information

Tours

Tour guides conduct a 40-minute, two-part educational program on the Battle of Atlanta every hour on the half hour from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The program includes special lighting, sound effects, music and narration (available in English, French, German, Japanese and Spanish).

Part I

A 14-minute film is shown detailing events that led to the Battle of Atlanta.

Part II

Students on their School Field Trip are escorted into the Cyclorama to experience the battle. On a second rotation through history, guides explain the history of the painting and answer audience questions.

Attractions

Movie

A 14-minute film shows events leading up to the Battle of Atlanta.

The Painting

The Cyclorama of the Battle of Atlanta is the world’s largest oil painting, painted in 1885-86 by artists from Germany. It has been shown in Grant Park since 1893.

Diorama

The three-dimensional foreground, called a diorama, was added in 1936, bringing a depth of 30 feet to the display.

Civil War Museum

Artifacts from the American Civil War period are displayed on two floors and include weapons, photographs and uniforms. A touch-screen computer system tells the story of the war. Other videos recount period history and Cyclorama restoration.

Steam Locomotive Texas

The centerpiece of the museum is the steam locomotive Texas, which played a key role in the Great Locomotive Chase of 1862 (also known as Andrews’ Raid). The Texas was used by the Confederates to pursue and recover the locomotive General, stolen by Union raiders led by James J. Andrews. The raiders planned to tear up tracks behind them to disrupt the vital Western and Atlantic Railroad supply line between Atlanta and Chattanooga. The General is currently on exhibit at the Kennesaw Civil War Museum in Marietta, Georgia. The Great Locomotive Chase was the subject of a Disney movie in 1956.

Bookstore

The Cyclorama bookstore offers a wide selection of books and other items on the American Civil War period.

[/showhide]

Showing 1 - 20 of 22 results