Museums

Museums

Chicago History Museum.jpg
1601 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60614, United States

Chicago History Museum

The Chicago History Museum stands at the crossroads of America’s past and its future. If you live in Chicago or visit here and are curious about the city’s past, present, and future, the Museum should be your first stop.

Your History Lives Here

The Chicago History Museum cares for, showcases, and interprets millions of authentic pieces of Chicago and U.S. history. Our ability to illuminate the past is a reminder of what really happened once upon a time, sheds light on the present, and compellingly informs the future.

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We invite you to engage with our stories and make history yourself.

Group Field Trips: Chicago History Museum

The Chicago History Museum proudly presents fun-filled, content-rich experiences for students from pre-K to grade 12. Our free field trips align with state and national learning standards.

Book a field trip to visit our original exhibitions. Utilize an audio tour written and performed by local teenagers. Prepare for or follow up on your visit with Great Chicago Stories and our other online resources.

We look forward to welcoming you to the Chicago History Museum.

Your Field Trip Experience

What will my students do? What will my students see?

There’s a lot to do, see, and learn at the Chicago History Museum!

During field trips, teachers and chaperones lead their groups on self-guided experiences through the Museum’s exhibitions. We encourage groups to explore our galleries at their own pace and stop at student-friendly activities along the way.

See it. Hear it.  Walk it. Ride it.

Whatever method suites your group best, We have great tours that will bring you closer to Chicago and its fascinating stories.

Tours are available for groups of adults ages 18 and up.

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Engaging Exhibitions for Youth Groups 

crossroads
Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Exelon Wing

Exhibition: Chicago: Crossroads of America

Explore Chicago’s changing economy, challenging crises, diverse neighborhoods, groundbreaking innovations, and lively cultural scene in six galleries.


Learn more about this exhibition

Location: KPMG and Paul and Katherine Snyder Community Gallery

Exhibition: Vivian Maiers Chicago

Through summer 2013

Come witness the life work of a nanny turned photographer that wowed the world with breathtaking images of everyday life in Urban America. Discover Chicago faces and neighborhoods of the 1950s and 1960s from an entirely new vantage point.


Slideshow

View a selection of Vivian Maier’s photographs on Flickr

Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Skyline Gallery

Exhibition: Magic

Through January 6, 2013

Discover Chicago’s place in American magic. Settle down in the object theater and meet Greta, a little girl who visits a wonderful store hoping to learn a magician’s secrets. Next door, explore a collection of magical artifacts and activities for young magicians that will inspired amazement and delight.


sensing chicago kids
Sensing Chicago

Located in: Konen Family Children’s Gallery

Exhibition: Sensing Chicago

  • Ride a high-wheel bicycle.
  • Hear the Great Chicago Fire.
  • Catch a fly ball at Old Comiskey Park.
  • Smell the city’s past.
  • Be a Chicago-style hot dog.

Did you know that history is beautiful, noisy, rough, stinky, and delicious? In this gallery, students can use their five senses to:

Recommended for grades 3 and 4. Due to the popularity of this gallery, special reservations for a 30 minute time slot are required. Please indicate your interest on the field trip reservation form.


diorama
Imaging Chicago: The Diorama

Location: Taiwani Foundation Diorama Hall

Exhibition: Imagining Chicago: The Diorama

Visit our beloved dioramas to experience the first 100 years of Chicago’s history. Hands-on activities challenge students to look closely at the scenes, find specific details, and put history into a larger context.


abe
Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Sanger P. Robinson Gallery 

Exhibition: Lincoln’s Chicago 

Catch a glimpse of the city Lincoln knew through portraits of his contemporaries and lithographic view of 1860s Chicago.


Abraham Lincoln

This exhibition highlights Lincoln’s election in 1860, his leadership during the Civil War, and his tragic assassination in a series of dramatic windows and audio narration.


Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Kovler Family Lobby

Exhibition: Unexpected Chicago

Through January 6, 2013

What’s the most surprising thing about a collection made up of millions of artifacts? A single artifact! This world-class collection holds the second largest costume collection in the world including clothing and accessories as well as thousands of linear feet of archives and manuscripts that make up the equivalent of forty-nine football fields or twelve Willis Towers. Unexpected Chicago is a way to reveal unexpected treasures of Chicago history a single artifact at a time.


Learn more about this exhibition

Located in: Benjamin Green-Field Gallery

Exhibition: Shalom Chicago

Opens October 21st. 2012

Explore the Jewish community’s rich history and contributions to the city’s growth and development, through personal stories, rare artifacts, and engaging multimedia presentations.


entrance

Exhibition: Treasures

This series of installations promotes exploration throughout the Museum!

  • Imagine riding low and slow in our custom-made, tricked-out 1978 Chevrolet Monte Carlo.
  • Learn about Abraham Lincoln and see his deathbed.
  • Play Street Smarts, a game that challenges students to match events with the intersections where they took place.

Location: Skyline Gallery, Bessie Green-Field Warshawsky Gallery, and Mazza Foundation Gallery

Exhibition: Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair

Opens March 16, 2013

Relive the experience of the Ebony Fashion Fair in this one-of-a-kind exhibition. Explore its fifty-year history, and discover how Eunice Johnson overcame adversity to bring high couture fashion to African American communities, while raising millions of dollars for charities along the way. More than sixty garments, including works by Oscar de la Renta, Christian Dior, Stephen Burrows, Yves Saint Laurent, and Patrick Kelly, help tell the story of this world-renowned fashion show and its redefinition of American beauty.

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Bureau of Engraving and Printing Logo.png
300 14th St SW, Washington, D.C., DC 20228, United States

Located in the heart of the Nation’s Capital, the BEP’s Washington, DC Tour and Visitor Center is a great place to learn all about U.S. paper currency.  You can see millions of dollars being printed as you walk along the gallery overlooking the production floor!  The free 40-minute experience includes an introductory film and gallery tour of the production process.  The visitor center includes exhibits and currency products for sale.

The Tour and Visitor Center is closed on weekends, Federal holidays, and the week between Christmas and New Years Day. The Tour and Visitor Center is open on the day after Thanksgiving, which has historically been our busiest day of the year. Please plan accordingly if you expect to visit on that day.

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Summer Camp & Scout Groups

Watch real money being printed at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington, DC! This is a fun tour for all ages. You will see how U. S. paper currency is printed, stacked, cut and examined for defects. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing also prints White House invitations, Treasury securities, identification cards, naturalization certificates, and other special security documents.

Tours and Hours of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Tours last about 30 minutes and are offered every 15 minutes, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The facility is closed on weekends, federal holidays and the week between Christmas and New Years. From April through August hours are extended from 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Because of heightened security, tour policies are subject to change. If the Department of Homeland Security level is elevated to CODE ORANGE, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing is CLOSED to the public.

Policies:

Cameras are allowed in the facility, but their use in the tour gallery is prohibited.

Visitors must pass through a metal detector and belongings will be screened before entering the building.

Group Visits

Tours for groups of 10 or more people run every 15 minutes from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. There is a 50-person maximum.  Group tours MUST be scheduled in advance with the tour office. Please call the Tour Scheduler at (202) 874-2330 or 1 (866) 874-2330. Group reservations are free and must be submitted by faxing the BEP’s group reservation request form to (202) 874-6331. The forms are available in MS Word and PDF formats below:

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Saratogo Automobile Museum Logo.jpg
110 Avenue of the Pines, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States

Saratoga Automobile Museum

Welcome to the Saratoga Automobile Museum where we preserve, interpret and exhibit automobiles and automotive artifacts. We celebrate the automobile and educate the general public, students and enthusiasts regarding the role of the automobile in New York State and in the wider world. In addition to technical and design aspects, our educational focus is on the past, present and future social and economic impact of the automobile.

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Saratoga Automobile Museum

Field Trips

Grade/age level specific field trips have been designed to engage and educate all students.  Each program begins with an introduction to our Museum and the history of the automobile in New York State, followed by a guided tour of each exhibit.  Programs conclude with a “Traffic Safety” music and craft project (for pre-k and elementary students) and a “New York State Auto Archaeology” scavenger hunt for middle-high school students.

*Each student will receive a gift bag from the museum containing practical, fun and informational materials.
Cost: $5.00 per student (Chaperones are free).

SAM’s Garage

SAM’s Garage is a place where children learn about cars while gearing up for life.

Programs at SAM’s Garage encourage non-traditional, multigenerational learning opportunities for underserved children utilizing historic automobiles. The goal is to help students increase their understanding and proficiency in math, science and history, while helping them to improve their desire to stay in school, develop strong leadership skills and healthy community relationships. Previous projects include the restoration of the iconic Ford Model TT Popcorn Wagon seen at many of the Museum’s summer auto and lawn shows, and a Model A Huckster built from scratch.

The Museum has also served as a host for the Pinewood Derby with local Cub Scouts, provides an education area inside the museum where students can learn about cars and racing and during the Holidays, welcomed Santa Claus to its garage.

The mission of the Saratoga Automobile Museum is to preserve, interpret and exhibit automobiles and automotive artifacts.

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Albany Pine Discovery Center.png
195 New Karner Rd, Albany, NY, United States

Looking for a one-of-a-kind learning experience for your students? The globally rare Albany Pine Bush offers Summer Camps and Scouts a locally unique outdoor classroom where learning comes alive. Our programs also travel to schools, bringing the Pine Bush to your classroom. Check out our educational program page to learn more about group programs offered through the Albany Pine Bush Preserve and Discovery Center. Our programs meet NYS Learning Standards and are led by trained staff and volunteers. Call us at (518)456-0655 and press 1 to book your program today!

Marvel at this Spectacular Attraction!

This fascinating ecosystem is one of just 20 inland pine barren environments in the world. The Discovery Center transforms this globally unique destination into an exciting adventure where learning comes naturally through hands-on activities.

Dare to Discover the Extraordinary

As the gateway to the Pine Bush, the Discovery Center introduces you to everything that makes the Preserve rare and adventurous. You can touch a snake skin, make a sand dune, plan a prescribed fire, learn how to help the environment and much more!

Exploration Station

Stop by our Exploration Station to explore “The World of Herps!” Our Summer Exploration Station will feature interactive stations on the unique biology and natural history of reptiles and amphibians native to the Pine Bush. Please call the Center before visiting for Exploration Station hours.

Get active and connected through nature

Take part in fascinating programs designed to inform and delight year-round. Join a First Friday Hike, take a walk to observe the flight displays of the American woodcock or solve mysteries along the trail in an all-natural C.S.I. (Critter Scene Investigation). These and other educational and recreational activities cost $3/person or $5/family.

Summer Camp & Scout Group Trips (All Grade levels)

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Summer Camp & Scout Groups All Ages

Do you want to get your class outside to experience a local and rare natural community?

If so, then a trip to Albany Pine Bush Preserve is the right choice for you. We have several programs to choose from and each program is led by a well trained and experienced guide. Our programs meet several NYS learning standards and are designed to promote hands-on, inquiry-based learning. We look forward to seeing you!

How do I sign up for a program?

Take a look at the programs below and decide which one is right for your class and the season of your visit. Then contact us at (518)456-0655 x1250 orinfo@albanypinebush.org to sign up. Programs need to be scheduled at least 2 weeks in advance.

If your school is unable to travel to the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center, please contact us about the Friends of the Pine Bush Community Transportation Reimbursement grant and our Outreach Programs.

How much does it cost?

$3.00 per student, teachers and chaperones attend free of charge.

Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center Programs

 Fall

Seeds of change (1.5 hours)

The Pine Bush needs our help! Join us in an exploration of how and why we are restoring the Albany Pine Bush Preserve. During this program we will investigate the tools that are used to maintain this globally rare ecosystem. Students will also have the opportunity to be a part of our restoration program by participating in a seed collection activity within the Pine Bush Preserve. The seeds that we collect will be used to restore degraded areas of the Pine Bush back to healthy pine barrens.

Suggested grade level: 5–9 Click here for detailed learning standards

Buckmoths (2 hours)*

Did you know the Albany Pine Bush has a greater number of moth and butterfly species than the entire state of New Jersey? Join us as we discover the diversity of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) that thrive in the Albany Pine Bush. Meet up close one of our most rare moths — the inland barrens buckmoth. Participate in authentic buckmoth research along the trails of the Pine Bush Preserve, experience buckmoth habitat first hand and learn why this insect needs the Pine Bush.

* Pre-requisite: Students should complete the “Butterflies and Moths of the Pine Bush” kit in preparation for this program.

Suggested grade level: 5–8 Click here for detailed learning standards

Discover the Albany Pine Bush: A unique habitat (1.5 hours)

The Albany Pine Bush Preserve represents one of the best remaining examples of an inland pine barrens ecosystem in the world. Join us on a journey to the Pine Bush to explore what makes this ecosystem so unique. Through authentic firsthand experience, students will be introduced to the Albany Pine Bush and the natural forces of fire and ice that have shaped this ecosystem yesterday and today. We’ll also explore the diversity of life that depends on the pine barrens for its survival.

Grade level: 1-12 Click here for detailed learning standards

Forces at work (1.5 hours)*

The Albany Pine Bush is a dynamic place, shaped by the forces of nature. Most prominent are the forces of weather and fire. This program begins with an introduction to the Pine Bush and the forces that have shaped it for thousands of years. Students will then participate in a hands-on activity that further explains how the forces of weather and fire continue to shape the Pine Bush today.

* Pre-requisite: Students should complete the “Discover the Pine Bush” kit in preparation for this program.

Suggested grade level: 5–8

A point in time (Part 1: 1 hour at your school, Part 2: 1.5 hours at the Discovery Center)

The landscape of the Pine Bush has changed dramatically over the past 60+ years. From unbroken tracts of pine barrens to a highly fragmented Preserve, the Pine Bush hardly resembles the vast barrens it once was. In Part I of this program (at your school), students will learn about the basic ecology of the Pine Bush and through hands on discovery, learn to use a compass and global positioning system unit (GPS). In Part II of this program (at the APBP), students hike in the Preserve, observe and track ongoing changes using established photo points. Students will use hand held GPS units to locate the photo points, then use a digital camera and compass bearing to photograph a scene that had been photographed one month to 40 years before.

Suggested grade level: 6–12 Click here for detailed learning standards

Winter

Where do all the wild things go? Explore on snowshoes Pine Bush winter ecology (2 hours)

How would you survive living outside for the winter? The Albany Pine Bush is a year-round home to many animal species. Where do they go and how do they survive during the winter? In this program, students will discover how animals are adapted to winter survival. Students will also learn how to search for and identify animal activity. The Discovery Center will provide all students with snowshoes for this program.

Suggested grade Level: 4–8

Discover the Albany Pine Bush: A unique habitat (1.5 hours)

The Albany Pine Bush Preserve represents one of the best remaining examples of an inland pine barrens ecosystem in the world. Join us on a journey to the Pine Bush to explore what makes this ecosystem so unique. Through authentic firsthand experience, students will be introduced to the Albany Pine Bush and the natural forces of fire and ice that have shaped this ecosystem yesterday and today. We’ll also explore the unique diversity of life that depends on the pine barrens for its survival.

Grade level: 1-12 Click here for detailed learning standards

Spring

Help a habitat (Part 1: 1 hour at your school, Part 2: 1.5 hours at the Discovery Center)

Participate in the restoration of the endangered Albany Pine Bush landscape and “help a habitat.” In the first part of this two-part program, students learn about the natural history of the Albany Pine Bush ecosystem and the challenges the Pine Bush faces today. Students then participate in a hands-on habitat restoration project for the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. Seeds of the Karner blue’s host plant, the wild blue lupine, are planted and germinated in the classroom. Students care for the seedlings in the classroom until they are ready for planting. In part two of the program students visit the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center and transplant their lupine seedlings to a Karner blue butterfly habitat restoration area in the Pine Bush Preserve.

Suggested grade level: 1–4 Click here for detailed learning standards

Exploring life in a pine barrens vernal pond (2 hours)*

You might call it big puddle or a little pond, but the temporary pools of water we find in the spring are actually “vernal ponds.” Come out to the Pine Bush and explore the plants and animals that make use of these special water bodies. Discover what characteristics make up a pine barrens vernal pond, create your own field notebook, and experience a habitat that is full of life. Maximum group size for this program is 30 students.

* Pre-requisite: Students should complete the “Pine Barrens Vernal Pond Kit” in-class education kit (available through the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center) before participating in this program.

Suggested grade level: 5–8 Click here for detailed learning standards

The future of the Karner blue is in our hands (1.5 hours)

Within the Albany Pine Bush lives the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly. Join us for an exploration into why this beautiful butterfly is nearing extinction. Learn about its natural history, how we are trying to save the Karner blue and how you can help.

Suggested grade level: 2 Click here for detailed learning standards

Discover the Albany Pine Bush: A unique habitat (1.5 hours)

The Albany Pine Bush Preserve represents one of the best remaining examples of an inland pine barrens ecosystem in the world. Join us on a journey to the Pine Bush to explore what makes this ecosystem so unique. Through authentic firsthand experience, students will be introduced to the Albany Pine Bush and the natural forces of fire and ice that have shaped this ecosystem yesterday and today. We’ll also explore the unique diversity of life that depends on the pine barrens for its survival.

Grade level: 1–12 Click here for detailed learning standards

Forces at work (1.5 hours)*

The Albany Pine Bush is a dynamic place, shaped by forces of nature. Most prominent are the forces of weather and fire. This program begins with an introduction to the Pine Bush and the forces that have shaped it for thousands of years. Students will then participate in a hands-on activity that further explains how the forces of weather and fire continue to shape the Pine Bush today.

* Pre-requisite: Students should complete the “Discover the Pine Bush” kit in preparation for this program.

Suggested grade level: 5–8 Click here for detailed learning standards

A point in time (Part 1: 1 hour at your school, Part 2: 1.5 hours at the Discovery Center)

The landscape of the Pine Bush has changed dramatically over the past 60+ years. From unbroken tracts of pine barrens to a highly fragmented Preserve, the Pine Bush hardly resembles the vast barrens it once was. In Part I of this program (at your school), students will learn about the basic ecology of the Pine Bush and through hands on discovery, learn to use a compass and global positioning system unit (GPS). In Part II of this program (at the APBP), students hike in the preserve, observe and track ongoing changes using established photo points. Students will use hand held GPS units to locate the photo points, then use a digital camera and compass bearing to photograph a scene that had been photographed one month to 40 years before.

Suggested grade level: 6–12 Click here for detailed learning standards

Summer

Discover the Albany Pine Bush: A unique habitat (1.5 hours)

The Albany Pine Bush Preserve represents one of the best remaining examples of an inland pine barrens ecosystem in the world. Join us on a journey to the Pine Bush to explore what makes this ecosystem so unique. Through authentic firsthand experience, students will be introduced to the Albany Pine Bush and the natural forces of fire and ice that have shaped this ecosystem yesterday and today. We’ll also explore the unique diversity of life that depends on the pine barrens for its survival.

Grade level: 1–12 Click here for detailed learning standards

Forces at work (1.5 hours)*

The Albany Pine Bush is a dynamic place, shaped by forces of nature. Most prominent are the forces of weather and fire. This program begins with an introduction to the Pine Bush and the forces that have shaped it for thousands of years. Students will then participate in a hands-on activity that further explains how the forces of weather and fire continue to shape the Pine Bush today.

* Pre-requisite: Students should complete the “Discover the Pine Bush” kit in preparation for this program.

Suggested grade level: 5–8 Click here for detailed learning standards

A point in time (Part 1: 1 hour at your school, Part 2: 1.5 hours at the Discovery Center)

The landscape of the Pine Bush has changed dramatically over the past 60+ years. From unbroken tracts of pine barrens to a highly fragmented Preserve, the Pine Bush hardly resembles the vast barrens it once was. In Part I of this program (at your school), students will learn about the basic ecology of the Pine Bush and through hands on discovery, learn to use a compass and global positioning system unit (GPS). In Part II of this program (at the APBP), students hike in the preserve, observe and track ongoing changes using established photo points. Students will use hand held GPS units to locate the photo points, then use a digital camera and compass bearing to photograph a scene that had been photographed one month to 40 years before.

Suggested grade level: 6–12 Click here for detailed learning standards

Exploring life in a pine barrens vernal pond (2 hours)*

You might call it big puddle or a little pond, but the temporary pools of water we find in the spring are actually “vernal ponds.” Come out to the Pine Bush and explore the plants and animals that make use of these special water bodies. Discover what characteristics make up a Pine Barrens vernal pond, create your own field notebook, and experience a habitat that is full of life. Maximum group size for this program is 30 students.

* Pre-requisite: Students should complete the “Pine Barrens Vernal Pond” in-class education kit (available through the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center) before participating in this program.

Suggested grade level: 5-8 Click here for detailed learning standards

We Can Come to You!

If you can’t come to us, let us bring our programs to you. Discovery Outreach Programs are programs brought to your school and presented in the classroom and on school grounds by trained Albany Pine Bush staff and education volunteers. Please give us a call to arrange an Outreach Program (518)456-0655 and press 1.

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Railroaders Memorial Museum.png
1300 9th Avenue, Altoona, PA, United States

Field Trips

The Railroaders Memorial Museum is dedicated to revealing, interpreting, commemorating and celebrating the significant contributions of Railroaders and their families to American life and industry.

Generations of Railroaders can trace the roots of their heritage at The Altoona Railroad Museum. Known as the only interactive Railroaders Museum in America! Visitors will experience Pennsylvania Railroad History through sights and sounds that will bring your group or family back into an historic era.

For more than a century Altoona was one of the most important rail facilities in the United States. The city was home to the Altoona Pennsylvania Railroad’s repair and maintenance shops, its locomotive construction facility, and its test department. Altoona’s location at the foot of the Allegheny front and its proximity to the Horseshoe Curve route over the mountains made the city a key location in the Altoona Pennsylvania Railroad’s operations.

World Famous Horseshoe Curve

Take a most beautiful drive through the Allegheny Mountains. Experience the challenge the Pennsylvania Railroad workers overcame by completing rail tracks through this rough terrain.
Once you have arrived at the Horseshoe Curve, enjoy one of the World’s most incredible engineering feats. Ride the Funicular or walk 194 beautiful landscaped steps to the tracks for a front seat view of a train mans’ wonder. You will also find the Horseshoe Curve to be a relaxing and entertaining place to enjoy a picnic lunch.

While visiting, be sure to stop by the Visitors Center to view the descriptive displays that will help you better appreciate the work involved in building such a marvel. The Visitors Center also houses a gift shop of souvenirs for every railroad buff – from books to hats and sweatshirts.

The “Funicular”

The “Funicular” is an incline plane designed to take you from the visitors center at Horseshoe Curve Historic Landmark up to the train tracks of Horseshoe Curve. Or if you prefer a nature walk, you may take the beautifully scenic steps to the top.

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All Aboard!

Come and experience the Railroaders Memorial Museum and Horseshoe Curve National Historic Landmark and learn about the Pennsylvania Railroad in its glory days and why it was so important to our region.

The Railroaders Memorial Museum offers free field trips to all school aged children grades K-12.  Bus drivers and teachers are admitted free too.  Parents and chaperones are admitted at our discounted group rate of $9.36 per person for Museum and Horeshoe Curve admittance.  The Horeshoe Curve only rate is $5.20 for each parent or chaperone.

The Railroaders Memorial Museum offers 3 full floors of exhibits, a move theatre that shows 2 movies every hour, a room where your group can eat their lunch inside or venture outside and eat at our picnic tables.  We also feature a fully stocked gift shop.

The Horseshoe Curve National Historic Landmark features a short film about the history of the Curve, an incline that will take your group “track side” so you can watch the trains travel around the Curve and the DeGol pavilion where your group can have a picnic lunch.

To schedule a field trip please email mstrohm@railroadcity.com or call Maria at 814-946-0834 ext. 201. Call today, dates are filling up fast!

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Queens Museum of Art.jpg
New York City Building, Queens, NY

The Queens Museum of Art is dedicated to presenting the highest quality visual arts and educational programming for people in the New York metropolitan area, and particularly for the residents of Queens, a uniquely diverse, ethnic, cultural and international community.

The Museum fulfills its mission by designing and providing art exhibitions, public programs and educational experiences that promote the appreciation and enjoyment of art, support the creative efforts of artists, and enhance the quality of life through interpreting, collecting, and exhibiting art, architecture, and design.

The Queens Museum of Art presents artistic and educational programs and exhibitions that directly relate to the contemporary urban life of its constituents while maintaining the highest standards of professional, intellectual, and ethical responsibility.

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Summer Camp & Scout Trips

We provide pre-K-12 students with fun learning experiences that integrate in-depth observation and interpretation of art and historical exhibits, and hands-on art-making activities. All of our educational programs emphasize Common Core standards, particularly in English Language Arts and New York City’s Blueprints for Teaching and Learning in the Arts.

Tours and workshops

We offer tours and workshops about our permanent exhibitions: The Panorama of the City of New York, The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany GlassRelief Map of the New York City Water Supply System and the World’s Fair. We also offer tours and workshops inspired by our changing exhibitions of international and local artists. Click here for more information on School Tours.

Summer Camp & Scout Group Tours of Museum Exhibitions

Our rotating exhibitions reflect many of the cultures found throughout our diverse borough. Viewing and discussing art from around the world creates the opportunity for students to develop a global perspective as they examine art and create work inspired by their personal vision of the world.

TRIP GUIDELINES

BOOK YOUR TRIP

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JFK Library and Museum Boston.jpg
Columbia Point, Boston, MA 02125, United States

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum is dedicated to the memory of our nation’s thirty-fifth president and to all those who through the art of politics seek a new and better world. Located on a ten-acre park, overlooking the sea that he loved and the city that launched him to greatness, the Library stands as a vibrant tribute to the life and times of John F. Kennedy.

Come tour our Museum which portrays the life, leadership, and legacy of President Kennedy, conveys his enthusiasm for politics and public service, and illustrates the nature of the office of the President.

Students and scholars can also arrange to conduct research using our collection of historical materials chronicling mid-20th century politics and the life and administration of John F. Kennedy.

Experience our Museum through our three theaters, period settings, and 25 dramatic multimedia exhibits, and enter the recreated world of the Kennedy Presidency for a “first-hand” experience of John F. Kennedy’s life, legacy, and leadership.

Shop in our Museum Store or dine in the JFK Café. Walk along the Harborwalk or picnic on our beautiful grounds at the Harbor’s edge. From May to October, President Kennedy’s 26′ sailboat Victura is on display on our grounds.

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Group Visits

Experience the life and legacy of President John F. Kennedy by taking a self-guided tour of the 25 Multimedia exhibits in our Museum.

Visit the Museum as part of a group of 12 or more and receive a discount on admission with reservations made at least two weeks in advance.

To Make a Reservation

To reserve a group visit, please contact our Group Visits Department using the information listed below or use our online Group Reservation Request Form.

Contact Information

For group reservations, please contact our Group Visits Department.

Phone: 617.514.1589 or 1.866.JFK.1960 x41589

Fax: 617.514.1593

Group Admission Rates with advanced reservations

Adults $10.00

Seniors and College Students $10.00

Youth (13-17) $9.00

Children (age 12 and under) Free

Duration

We suggest that you allow a minimum of 90 minutes to get the most from your Museum experience.

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Interactive Exhibits 

Clouds Over Cuba

Clouds over Cuba

Explore the Cuban Missile Crisis from various perspectives. This interactive exhibit sets the context of the early 1960s, and gives you the opportunity to explore What If? scenarios.

More Details


President's Desk

The Presidents Desk

Sit at President Kennedy’s Oval Office Desk and discover what it means to hold the highest office in the land.

More Details


World on the Brink: JFK and the Cuban Missile Crisis

World on a Brink

For 13 days in October 1962, a confrontation between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. brought the world to the abyss of nuclear destruction and the end of mankind. Read formerly classified documents and listen in on secretly recorded ExComm meetings as President Kennedy and his advisors seek a peaceful resolution for the removal of Soviet intercontinental missiles from Cuba.

More Details


Integrating Ole Miss

Integrating Ole Miss

In the fall of 1962 the college town of Oxford, Mississippi, erupted in violence. James Meredith, an African American, attempted to register at the all-white University of Mississippi, known as “Ole Miss.” This site lets visitors witness the events firsthand through the actual letters, recorded telephone conversations, and images of those who made history.

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White House Diary

White House Diary

Travel back in time to the early 1960′s and experience first- hand each of President Kennedy’s thousand days in office through the interactive White House Diary – a daily schedule of President John F. Kennedy that includes digital scans of his actual appointment diary for any given day as well as video, audio, and photos of the day’s events.

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Virtual Tour of the JFK Library Museum

Virtual Museum Tour

This online tour includes selected highlights of the museum’s introductory film and allows you to virtually explore selected exhibits and learn more about key items in the Museum collection.

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We Choose the Moon

We Chose Moon

Each stage of this interactive online exhibit allows visitors to follow the historic moon landing minute by minute and explore archival photos and footage of President Kennedy’s pioneering space efforts. More than 1.3 million individuals logged on to launch of this international award-winning website during the July 2009 40-year anniversary of the five-day journey to the moon.

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Permanent Exhibits 

Leadership for the 60's Campaign Button

Campaign Trail

After narrowly losing the vice presidential nomination in 1956, Senator John F. Kennedy sought the presidency in 1960. After hard-fought primary victories, JFK won his party’s nomination and faced-off against sitting Vice President Richard Nixon in a campaign that featured the first live-broadcast television debates between presidential candidates. After his election as the 35th president of the United States, JFK set out to redeem his campaign pledge to “get America moving again.”

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Radio and Television

The Briefing Room 

John F. Kennedy was the first president to effectively use the new medium of television to speak directly to the American people through live televised press conferences. Video samples of his responses to reporters’ questions and exhibits of objects and documents illustrate the wide range of issues he confronted as President.  Also included is his speech to the people of West Berlin denouncing the construction of the Berlin Wall.

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Launch of the Mercury MR-3 Space Capsule Freedom 7

The Space Race 

In 1961 responding to the Soviet Union’s lead in the exploration of space, President Kennedy challenged the United States to keep up in the “Space Race” and not fall behind the Soviets.  He said: “We have a long way to go in the space race. We started late. But this is the new ocean, and I believe the United States must sail on it and be in a position second to none”.  Kennedy set the goal of landing an American on the Moon before the end of the decade and initiated the programs to make it possible.

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Robert F. Kennedy's US Treasury Badge

Attorney General Office

President Kennedy appointed his 35-year old brother Robert Francis Kennedy as the attorney general of the United States. The close working relationship of John and Robert Kennedy was one of the most unusual and successful in the history of American public life. When Robert Kennedy became attorney general, the civil rights struggle was entering a new phase of activism which precipitated the Justice Department involvement in protecting and upholding the rights of many African Americans.

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Carolina Rocking Chair

Oval Office 

The Oval Office has been the President’s office since 1909.  The preference for an oval room dates back to George Washington, who greeted his guests standing in a circle around him, equally distant from the President.  The circle became a symbol of democracy.  President Kennedy personalized his Oval Office with his collections of ship models and scrimshaw, reflective of his lifelong affection for the sea and sailing.  In this setting visitors view a video covering the struggle against racial segregation in 1963.

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Watercolor Painting of the White House Treaty Room

First Lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy

After becoming first lady at the age of thirty-one, Jacqueline Kennedy embarked on extensive historic restoration of the White House interiors, in which she sought to make the White House a museum of the presidency. Mrs. Kennedy also used the prestige of her position to champion American arts and culture, often inviting prominent actors, artists, writers, poets, and musicians to participate and perform at White House events. Her simple-yet-elegant sophistication and interest in other cultures made her well-known and beloved around the world.

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Kennedy Commemorative Cup

Kennedy Family

John F. Kennedy was the offspring of two families, the Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, whose roots stretched back to Ireland. They immigrated to Boston in the 1840′s seeking greater economic opportunity, religious and political liberty in America. The Irish in particular readily adapted to the American political system. By the end of the nineteenth century the President’s two grandfathers had become successful Boston politicians, establishing the Kennedy tradition of political involvement.

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Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum.jpg
18 Highlawn Road, Warner, NH, United States

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum, Education and Cultural Center, is dedicated to connecting people of today with 20,000 years of ongoing Native American cultural expression. The Museum embraces cultural diversity and encourages responsible environmental action based on respect for nature. Through exhibitions and programs, the Museum seeks to challenge and inspire all of us to improve the quality of our lives and our world.

Voted by NH Magazine as the Best Cultural Center of 2012, Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum is a great place to bring the entire family. Fun educational tours, beautiful grounds, the Village of Warner and Rollins State Park are all reasons to visit. Children will appreciate the scenic sets, animated characters, and realistic costumes to be discovered at Mt. Kearsarge!

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum brings you on a memorable journey encompassing the amazing diversity of North American Indian cultures and reverence for nature. Discover the past by examining artifacts left behind in various ancient Indian territories. Combination tours also include a guided walk through the Medicine Woods Nature Trail featuring 100 plants native to our area, that were used by Native peoples for tools, medicines, shelter, and more!

Don’t forget to make a pit stop at The Dream Catcher Gift Shop to purchase a souvenir on your way out!

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glowing turtle icon Educational Tours
Over the course of 20 years, MKIM has offered educational group tours to over 105,000 children. Education is the core of our mission and we look forward to welcoming your group on a memorable journey encompassing the amazing diversity of North American Indian cultures and reverence for nature. In addition to school tours, MKIM offers tours for homeschoolers, scout tours, senior tours, and special interest tours for groups such as cultural awareness, gardening, craft, Native studies, and museum studies groups.Groups begin their visit by viewing a 10-minute DVD that orients them to the museum. Museum Educators introduce themselves and lay out the framework and rules for the tour. Then the journey begins!Enter the Northeastern Woodlands with its birch bark containers, moose hair embroidery and split ash baskets, into the Southeast with artifacts from the Seminole and Cherokee cultures. Around a corner, enter the Southwest with a fascinating discussion about corn, pueblo pottery, Navajo weaving and basketry from the western part of the country.Next, step into the Plains Galleries.  This work, completed under the direction of Chris Bullock, Wampanoag, brings a full-scale furnished tipi into the galleries! Children and adults alike will marvel at this glimpse into Plains life with discussions of the American bison, beadwork and feather headdresses. The Northwest Coast is represented by artifacts such as harpoon heads, fur lined moccasins, model kayaks and more recent stone sculptures.Finally, our Ceremonial Room focuses on the pipes, the musical instruments and the regalia that have been used in ceremonies of all kinds by Native Americans. Connect the Circle Tours also include a guided walk through of the Medicine Woods Nature Trail, where we have over 100 plants native to our area that have been used by Native peoples for tools, medicines, foods, dyes, transportation, shelter, and more. Click here to download a Group Reservation Form. 

MKIM is a natural resource for classroom teachers, home schoolparents, youth group leaders and enrichment coordinators. In addition to offering group tours of the museum the museum offers Educator Resource Kits, Outreach Programs and specifics on how MKIM aligns with the New Hampshire Department of Education’s State Curriculum Frameworks for Teaching Social Studies.

Plains-style tipi.  Photo by Richard Senor. 2008.

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Group tours

Guided tours of the Museum for groups of 10 or more are available by reservation only. Reservations can be made up to a year in advance. Please call (603) 456-2600 or download and mail in the Group Reservation Form to secure your spot today!

MUSEUM GROUP TOUR PRICES
Students 12 and Under $5.50
Students 17 and Under $6.50
Adults 18 and Over $7.50
Seniors 65 and Over $6.50
MUSEUM AND MEDICINE WOODS
TOUR PRICES
Students 12 and Under $10.50
Students 17 and Under $12.50
      Adult Chaperones $5.00
      Teacher Aides Free
Adults 18 and Over $14.50
Seniors 65 and Over $12.50
Ritz Theater and Museum.jpg
829 North Davis Street, Jacksonville, FL, United States

Building on the community’s proud heritage, the Ritz is truly a Special Place, where history’s missing chapters are being restored, where talent is nurtured and creativity is celebrated.  It is a community gathering place where ideas are exchanged, information is disseminated and a roadmap for the future is developed.

Whether visiting the museum, attending a concert, viewing a film or listening to a lecture, the Ritz has a special energy that leaves you with a special feeling. There is always an exhibition, music, dance or the dramatic arts inside the Ritz that will enthrall, educate and entertain.

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YOU’RE INVITED TO VISIT THE RITZ THEATRE & MUSEUM!

Our permanent museum collection presents the history of Northeast Florida’s African American community, featuring a walk through old LaVilla and a dynamic multi-media display highlighting brothers James Weldon Johnson and John Rosamond Johnson, Jacksonville native sons and composers of “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing.”

The Museum Gallery showcases a variety of changing art exhibits throughout the year.

DOCENT GUIDED TOUR GROUPS

Guided tours are led by trained docents who will provide information about the exhibits featured in the museum.

STUDENT GROUPS

We require one chaperone for every ten students; chaperones admitted free.

SELF-GUIDED TOURS

Individuals and small groups can visit the museum without a guide at the discretion of museum staff.

SCHEDULING A GUIDED TOUR

To schedule a guided tour, please call (904) 632-5555 ext. 228 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. weekdays. The following information is needed: school or group name, address and telephone number; contact person’s name; preferred tour date and time; grade level and number of students and chaperones.  The museum can accommodate 50 guests at one time.  This number includes chaperones accompanying student groups.  YOU MUST RECEIVE A WRITTEN CONFIRMATION OF YOUR DATE BEFORE YOU ARRIVE.  Please notify the Ritz Theatre & Museum of any cancellations at least 48 hours (2 days) prior to the tour date.  Tours may be rescheduled if space is available.  PLEASE BE PUNCTUAL AS THE MUSEUM TOUR SCHEDULE IS VERY BUSY.  LATE ARRIVAL MAY RESULT IN CANCELLATION.  THE MUSEUM CANNOT ACCOMMODATE GROUPS OF UNSCHEDULED VISITORS.

ENTRANCE FEES:

(EXCEPT FOR SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS)

Adults (18-64) $8.00; Children (4-17) $5.00; Senior Citizens (65 and older) $5.00; Children (3 and under free)

GROUP RATES:

– Groups of 25 or more

Adults (18-64) – $7.00, Children (4-17) – $3.00, Seniors (65+) – $3.00

Payments can be made in advance or at the time of your tour.  Cash, cashier’s check or money orders payable to the Ritz Theatre & Museum -COJ.  Credit/debit card payment accepted.  Identification must match the name on the card.   Personal checks accepted with government issued identification.

Click Here to schedule a guided tour

PARKING:

After unloading visitors at the main entrance, buses should proceed to the church parking lot on Davis Street across the street from the theatre.  VISITORS MUST BE DROPPED OFF IN THE PARKING LOT AT THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO ENSURE GUEST SAFETY.

MUSEUM MANNERS

The Ritz Theatre & Museum is a repository of many rare and priceless collections.  Objects from our collections and from other museums are on display in the gallery and the permanent exhibit of our museum.  The following rules are for the safety and security of these objects and our visitors:

  •  NO STILL OR MOVING PICTURES ARE TO BE TAKEN IN THE MUSEUM.
  •  NO CELL PHONE, PICTURE CELL PHONE OR iPOD USAGE ALLOWED.
  •  NO FOOD, DRINKS OR CHEWING GUM.
  •  NO RUNNING, LOUD TALKING OR RECKLESS BEHAVIOR.
  •  NO HANDLING OF OBJECTS.
  •  NO BACKPACKS

Arrive 10 minutes before your scheduled tour to allow time for unloading and restroom break.

Do not bring more than the scheduled number of visitors.

Bring a minimum of one chaperone per 10 children.

Provide a name tag for each student.

Chaperones should:

 Supervise their groups and maintain order.  Chaperones are responsible for the good behavior and discipline of students.  Uncontrollable students will be asked to leave the museum.

 Stay with their students at all times including restroom visits and help students move quietly through the museum

 Assist in providing a positive learning experience.

During the museum visit, docents will guide students through specific standards based activities.

Following the museum visit, teachers may coordinate optional post-museum activities through the downtown Jacksonville Public Library.

Each museum field trip is approximately 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Maximum group size is 60 students.

The Museum fee is $3.00 per student. Transportation is the responsibility of the teacher.

Contact Adonnica Toler, museum assistant, to schedule a field trip, 904-632-5555 or atoler@coj.net.

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Grounds for Sculpture Logo.jpg
18 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton Township, NJ, United States

Grounds For Sculpture exhibits works by well-known and emerging contemporary sculptors in the museum buildings and landscaped sculpture park. Centrally located in Hamilton, New Jersey, and mid-way between New York City and Philadelphia, it is easily accessible via major highways and public rail systems. Open year-round, special exhibitions, programs, and events are scheduled for your education and enjoyment.

A visit to Grounds for Sculpture New Jersey is one of the best year round things to do in New Jersey. Utilizing both outdoor gardens and two indoor settings, Grounds for Sculpture can be appreciated even during inclement weather. The manicured landscaping of the Grounds for Sculpture combine with the variety of the pieces found here to give visitors a truly unique experience. Perhaps more than any other New Jersey attraction, natural beauty and human creativity come together here.

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Summer Camp & Scout Group Tours

Tour Grounds For Sculpture and discover art and nature at play!

Every year over 500 guided tours are offered at Grounds For Sculpture. Volunteer Docents undergo extensive training and research in preparation for tours.  Docents are available to lead tours for a variety of groups.  For anyone interested in a less structured tour of the park, self-guided tour maps and exhibition catalogues are available in the Visitor’s Center.

Self-guided maps of the grounds and exhibition brochures are available in the Visitor’s Center.

Guided tours are available to schools and other student or adult groups by appointment only. For more information, please call the Tour Coordinator at (609) 586-0616 ext. 200.

Groups with advance reservation can visit GFS for a modest fee. In addition, guided tours can be arranged for groups of 50 students or less at no additional charge.

Special events are a part of the calendar at Grounds for Sculpture Hamilton, including live music during the summer months in the outdoor section of the property. There are also guided tours of the art available periodically, so be sure to ask the staff of Grounds for Sculpture New Jersey what special events or tours are offered during your visit.

In addition to events for you to watch and listen to, you can participate in the creativity that makes Grounds for Sculpture Hamilton such an excellent place. Art workshops are offered to beginners of all ages. Sometimes children can learn aspects of sculpting during a kids’ workshop, and the next workshop offered will be exclusively for adults who want to learn to sculpt.

Visitors to Grounds For Sculpture can learn about contemporary sculpture through a variety of educational programs, including:

  • Hands-on art-making workshops for adults and children;
  • Artist residencies and demonstrations;
  • Lectures from artists and experts
  • Tours for adults, schoolchildren, toddlers and touch tours for the visually challenged.

Work on an activity together! Sculpture Search in the Park activity sheets are available in the Visitor’s Center.  These activity sheets will help guide you through an educational journey in the park while learning about sculpture.  Family Exhibition Guides change seasonally and are available for pickup at all information desks. These activity sheets relate specifically to the rotating exhibitions in our indoor galleries.

Summer Camp & Scout Groups or educational groups with advance reservations receive a greatly reduced park admission fee Tuesday-Friday.

The park also offers several day-long events during the year which feature activities for every member of the family. For more information, please visit our tours page or contact the Tour Coordinator at yfranklin@groundsforsculpture.org

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Edventure Children Museum South Carolina 2.jpg
211 Gervais Street, Columbia, SC, United States

EdVenture is the largest children’s museum in the Southeastr, located in Columbia, South Carolina. EdVenture opened to the public in 2003. It has 8 galleries covering 67,000 square feet, plus hands-on exhibits, 2 resource centers, and a 200-seat theater. 40,000 square feet of the total 67,000 square feet is devoted to exhibit galleries, laboratories and visitor amenities. An additional 7,000 square feet of outdoor gallery space is located just outside the museum’s front door. Within the total 74,000 square feet there are approximately 350 individual hands-on exhibits. There is also a statue of ‘Eddie’ on the first floor of the museum which children can climb into and learn about the insides of people. It is located at 211 Gervais Street in midtown Columbia, next to the South Carolina State Museum.

Edventure Exhibits

For every child who visits EdVenture, seeing will be believing and doing will mean remembering. All exhibits at EdVenture are hands-on and experiential. Click on the link above to view all exhibits available for view. 

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Make your next field trip exciting and educational! Our curriculum-based “EdVentures” are designed to meet standards in science, math, social studies, language arts and health. Our programs place a strong emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking to complement your classroom instruction.

Schedule

Overview

  • Field studies last 120 minutes including a 45 minute program filled with age-appropriate, SC Educational Standards-based activities led by an EdVenture educator. The remaining 75 minutes of the visit are devoted to museum exploration.
  • Field studies can be scheduled for Tuesday through Friday.
  • The minimum number of participants is 15. Students may be divided into groups in order to ensure a successful program.
  • One adult is required for every seven children.
  • During your visit, feel free to stop by EdCetera®, the EdVenture store.

Benefits

  • Fun and educational: students will enjoy 120 minutes of stimulating, hands-on programming — EdVenture style!
  • Standards-based instruction: all exhibits visited are designed on standards-based curriculum. For specific SC Educational Standards in each of our group programs, please view our list of programs.

Cost

  • Student admission fee is $8.50 per child self-led exploration.
  • One chaperone per every seven children is required. Chaperones pay $5.00 per person.
  • Teachers are welcome free with their group.
  • You may opt for an extended stay (60 additional minutes) for an extra $1.50 per person.

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EdVenture can come to your Summer Camp or group meeting with a variety of hands-on educational experiences. We have a dedicated staff of educators who are completely “in the know” when it comes to making learning more fun and engaging for students.

EdVenture-To-Go

EdVenture at Your School

Don’t have the time or budget for travel but still want your students to have the EdVenture Experience? That’s not a problem. We’ll bring EdVenture to you! We’ve taken our best field studies and made them mobile so students everywhere can experience learning through active, hands-on participation. These in-school Field Studies will entertain and educate students without taking an entire day from your teaching schedule.

 EdVenture-To-Go Classroom Field Studies

EdVenture Classroom Field Studies include a 45-minute program with age-appropriate, standards-based activities led by an EdVenture Educator.

  • Each program accommodates up to 25 students.
  • The cost is $6 per student for each 45-minute program, plus mileage outside of the Midlands.
  • There is a minimum program fee of $150 per program on the same day. In that case, the cost will only be $100 per additional program.

EdVenture-To-Go Assembly Field Studies

  • Each program accommodates up to 150 people.
  • The cost is $2 per student for each 45-minute program.
  • There is a minimum program fee of $200.

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Kalmar Nyckel Wilmington Delaware.jpg
1124 E 7th St, Wilmington, DE, United States

The Original Kalmar Nyckel

The original Kalmar Nyckel was one of America’s pioneering colonial ships. Its historical significance rivals that of the Mayflower, yet her remarkable story has never been widely told.

Did you know…

The original Kalmar Nyckel sailed from Sweden to the New World in 1638 leaving its passengers to establish the first permanent European settlement in the Delaware Valley, the Colony of New Sweden in present-day Wilmington, Delaware. She made a total of four roundtrip crossings of the Atlantic—more than any other ship of the era. Her first voyage to the New World left 24 settlers of Swedish, Finnish, German and Dutch descent in the Delaware Valley. Joining them was a black freedman who sailed from the Caribbean aboard her companion ship the Fogel Grip.

The Present Day Kalmar Nyckel

The present day Kalmar Nyckel serves as Delaware’s seagoing goodwill ambassador. She was built by a group of committed citizens to be a continuing witness to the courage and spirit of those individuals who undertook the mid-winter North Atlantic crossing in 1637-1638.

Since 1998, the ship has served as an outreach platform for the State of Delaware and a catalyst for social and economic development. The ship provides a unique platform for the Foundation’s educational programming as well as a venue for diplomatic, recreational, governmental and commemorative functions. The ship is owned and operated by the Kalmar NyckelFoundation, a non-profit organization that offers people of all ages a variety of sea and land based learning and recreational experiences.

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Summer Camp & Scout Field Trips

Find more information about the Kalmar Nyckel including its specifications and History through the years by clicking the Image Above.

Join our award-winning ship and shipyard programs for fun, learning, and adventure.  As a full-scale re-creation of the colonial ship that brought the first permanent European settlers to Delaware and the Delaware Valley,Kalmar Nyckel is one of the world’s great educational resources.

Students get to travel back in time to the “Age of Sail” and rediscover Delaware’s fascinating colonial and maritime history.  Our typical ship and shipyard program can handle up to 84 students a day — with three (3) “underway” stations on the ship and four (4) interactive stations on land.  The program usually takes about 4 hours.  Participants engage in “hands-on history,” discovering that learning is fun and that fun can be informative.

Our ship and shipyard programs are available in a variety of formats and can be tailored to meet the academic needs of any group.

Be sure to learn more about our interactive education programming by viewing this short film detailing our “Starting A Colony” program.

Please contact the Kalmar Nyckel Foundation office at 302.429.7447 or sheed@kalmarnyckel.org for program pricing and additional information.

Please visit our 2013 Education Schedule for more information.

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Scouting Programs

Education Scouting Programs

Come aboard Kalmar Nyckel for a scouting adventure of a lifetime.

Earn a Kalmar Nyckel Scout Patch by participating in our interactive ship and shipyard programs.  Learn how to tie nautical knots, haul active lines, and raise sail with our Captain and expert crew.  Learn more about Delaware’s maritime and colonial history.  Sing authentic sea chanteys with Kalmar Nyckel’s merry band!

BOOK YOUR TROOP Today!

Please contact the Kalmar Nyckel Foundation office at 302.429.7447 or sheed@kalmarnyckel.org for program pricing and addtional information.

All Scouts Welcome!

Education Scouting Programs

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Atlanta Cyclorama Logo.png
Atlanta Cyclorama & Civil War Museum, Cherokee Avenue Southeast, Atlanta, GA, United States

Take a stirring journey through time in Atlanta’s Cyclorama. Sit at the center of a sweeping panorama of the Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864, during the American Civil War.

On that day Confederate troops led by General John B. Hood made a desperate attempt to save Atlanta from the encircling Union armies. They were initially successful, but the Union troops, led by Major General William T. Sherman, regained positions lost earlier in the day and won the battle. By nightfall, more than 12,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing.

The Cyclorama painting — 42 feet tall and 358 feet in circumference — is said to be the largest painting in the world. It offers breathtaking realism enhanced by a foreground of three-dimensional figures and terrain. The presentation is accompanied by music and narration, available in five languages.

When you visit the Cyclorama in Atlanta’s Grant Park you can also see artifacts of the war displayed in the Civil War Museum and a steam locomotive known as the Texas, a veteran of the Great Locomotive Chase of 1862.

Summer Camp & Scout  Group Programs Available 

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Summer Camp & Scout Trips The Atlanta Cyclorama

Give your Students a field Trip back in history as they take a stirring journey through time in Atlanta’s Cyclorama. Sit at the center of a sweeping panorama of the Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864, during the American Civil War. The Atlanta Cyclorama offers a unique inside look into the past of Atlanta Georgia in time of Civil War. A School Field trip to the Atlanta Cyclorama offers a panoramic presentation of the Battle of Atlanta with authentic military artifacts from the period.  Students on their School field trip will also have the opportunity to see and understand the past of the Civil war through a number of different mediums offered by the Atlanta Cyclorama.

Tour Information

Tours

Tour guides conduct a 40-minute, two-part educational program on the Battle of Atlanta every hour on the half hour from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The program includes special lighting, sound effects, music and narration (available in English, French, German, Japanese and Spanish).

Part I

A 14-minute film is shown detailing events that led to the Battle of Atlanta.

Part II

Students on their Group Field Trip are escorted into the Cyclorama to experience the battle. On a second rotation through history, guides explain the history of the painting and answer audience questions.

Attractions

Movie

A 14-minute film shows events leading up to the Battle of Atlanta.

The Painting

The Cyclorama of the Battle of Atlanta is the world’s largest oil painting, painted in 1885-86 by artists from Germany. It has been shown in Grant Park since 1893.

Diorama

The three-dimensional foreground, called a diorama, was added in 1936, bringing a depth of 30 feet to the display.

Civil War Museum

Artifacts from the American Civil War period are displayed on two floors and include weapons, photographs and uniforms. A touch-screen computer system tells the story of the war. Other videos recount period history and Cyclorama restoration.

Steam Locomotive Texas

The centerpiece of the museum is the steam locomotive Texas, which played a key role in the Great Locomotive Chase of 1862 (also known as Andrews’ Raid). The Texas was used by the Confederates to pursue and recover the locomotive General, stolen by Union raiders led by James J. Andrews. The raiders planned to tear up tracks behind them to disrupt the vital Western and Atlantic Railroad supply line between Atlanta and Chattanooga. The General is currently on exhibit at the Kennesaw Civil War Museum in Marietta, Georgia. The Great Locomotive Chase was the subject of a Disney movie in 1956.

Bookstore

The Cyclorama bookstore offers a wide selection of books and other items on the American Civil War period.

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Maritime Aquarium in Norwalk Connecticut.jpg
10 North Water Street, Norwalk, CT, United States

Opened in July 1988, The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk offers visitors of all ages the opportunity to have a good time while learning about the vital natural resource just off our shore: Long Island Sound. Set in a refurbished 1860s factory at the mouth of the Norwalk River, the Aquarium building and its location reflect the region’s industrial past and human uses of Long Island Sound for recreation and commerce.

Visitors explore at their own pace, observing 34 exhibits featuring more than 1,200 marine animals of 259 species. The Long Island Sound journey begins along a freshwater river and the shallow waters of the salt marsh, then moves into deeper and deeper habitats out to the open ocean. These close encounters with animals, enhanced by friendly volunteer interpreters and informative display panels, educate visitors about the aquatic life of Long Island Sound and its watershed.

The sharks, seals, river otters, sea turtles and other animals, carefully tended in re-created natural settings, serve as ambassadors both for their species and the Sound’s natural environment. These intimate encounters are the heart of the learning experience and provide visitors – children especially – with a basis for understanding their role in the web of life.

otter-curled-photo

Camp Directors & Scout Troop Leaders:

Just 10 or more campers or scouts and you qualify for our lower group rates!

Call Reservations: 203-852-0700, ext. 2206.

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Educational Programs

Preschool-Class

The Maritime Aquarium offers exciting science-education experiences … in the Aquarium, in the field and at your school. The inspiration of this learning is Long Island Sound, perhaps familiar to students for its proximity but a fascinating unexplored world below the surface.

Interactions with our live animals and engaging science programs can help you inspire your students to become eager learners and young conservationists. We offer standards-based learning opportunities that make science a positive adventure for your students as they’re introduced to scientific concepts, processes and the importance of science in our lives today.

Of course, every visit to our nationally recognized aquarium is a fun and educational experience that gets your students up close to sharks, seals, river otters, sea turtles, jellyfish and dozens of other species native to Long Island Sound and its watershed. The Aquarium also has Connecticut’s largest IMAX movie theater. Documentaries on our six-story screen wil transport your students on an unforgettable learning adventure.

Educators voiced concerns. Aquarium donors answered. We have financial assistance available for Aquarium admission, IMAX® movies, programs and bus transportation costs. Some, but not all, financial aid is needs-based. Aid is limited and awarded on a first-come first-served basis. Book early! Enjoy it all at the Aquarium or in the field. Or a Traveling Teacher will bring the fun and learning right into your classroom or auditorium, or to a nearby park, pond, stream or beach.

There are lots of possibilities as you design just the right fun and educational visit to The Maritime Aquarium for your students.

Programs by Grade

Pre-K & Kindergarten

Grades 1 – 2

Grades 3 – 4

Grades 5-8

You’ll find all the answers for your planning here. Click here…

Here are two common schedules used by teachers. Click here…

Plus, you can perfect your visit by matching your focus of studies to any one of the titles available in our IMAX film library, showing in stunning clarity on our six-story screen! Click here..

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The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk brings Long Island Sound Marine Science to Your Camp or Trrop

Have the Aquarium visit your summer camp or scout troop! Except where noted, each 45-minute presentation is for groups of up to 28 students and costs $165 plus additional travel fees. Discounts are given for multiples of the same program held on the same day in the same classroom: $100 for the second program, $95 for the third and $90 for each additional.

Additional charges may include: a “layover fee” for gaps of an hour or more between classes; travel charges; and parking fees.

Pre-K and Kindergarten

“House for Hermit Crab”

Students follow along month by month as they listen to this classic book about a year in the life of a young hermit crab. They use their senses and sharpen observational and verbal skills as they share what they notice and ask questions. They handle some live animals from the story and look for similarities and differences in various crabs, including an invasive species.Program duration dependent on the students’ attention spans.

Living vs. Non-Living

For kindergarten only. Through a guided discussion, students share their observations about the characteristics of living and once-living organisms, as well as non-living things. They compare and contrast two live animals of the same grouping.

Sharks!

For ages 4 & up only.  Members of the same group of animals can look and behave very differently. For example, herring and sharks are both fish, but have distinct differences in their size, color and habits. Activities include touching shark teeth, measuring themselves against a life-sized shark puzzle they assemble, and weighing out food for the Aquarium’s sharks.

Grades 1 & 2

Intertidal Animals

By observing and touching a variety of live intertidal animals, students learn about these creatures’ different structures and behaviors. Activities focus on how these animals meet their basic needs for oxygen, food, water, shelter and space.

Sea Turtle Life Cycle

After hearing a story about the life cycle of a loggerhead sea turtle, students play a counting game that teaches about the needs of turtles and demonstrates how and why few survive from hatchling to adult. Students look for special structures and behaviors that help sea turtles meet their basic needs, and discuss ways they can help protect these ancient creatures.

Whales and Dolphins

Is a dolphin a whale? How do scientists group whales? How are you like a whale? Students observe and describe similarities and differences, measure themselves against a life-sized whale puzzle, learn about conservation issues and participate in activities that demonstrate whale and dolphin adaptations.

Grades 3 & 4

Life Between the Tides

The intertidal zone is a unique habitat in which organisms have different behavioral and structural adaptations to survive the rising and falling of tides every day. Students will learn about the moon’s effect on tides, as they read a tide chart for the day of their visit and discuss how the organisms depend on the living and non-living features of the environment for survival. And they share observations and ask questions as they notice and handle a variety of live intertidal invertebrates.

Sharks and Fish

Animals have structural adaptations for getting food, such as specialized teeth or a keen sense of smell. Students will work in teams to rotate through stations focusing on the animals’ adaptations and survival strategies, the similarities between sharks and other fish, and conservation issues. Activities include measuring out the amount of food that the Aquarium feeds its sharks, observing physical adaptations of a fish, and touching shark jaws, skin and other artifacts.

Squid

Squid have very unique behavioral and structural adaptations for survival, and they depend on living and non-living components of their environment. Students observe and ask about these adaptations and interactions as they learn dissection skills. They also compare and contrast squid with other mollusks, such as snails and clams.

Grades 5-8

Brine Shrimp Inquiry (for Grades 5-6)

Available only as a 90-minute program. Through a guided inquiry experiment, students investigate how brine shrimp respond to different stimuli while implementing the basics of the scientific method. Students work in groups for formulate a hypothesis, note observations, chance variables and state results. $265 for first program, $185 for others on the same day.

Intertidal Habitat

The intertidal zone is a unique ecosystem in which organisms have different adaptations to sense and respond to information about their environment as the tides rise and fall. Students learn about the moon’s effect on tides, as they read a tide chart for the day of their visit and discuss challenges for animals living in the intertidal zone and the physical factors with which they interact. Students share observations and ask questions as they notice and handle a variety of intertidal invertebrates.

Marine World Magnified

The unseen marine world opens up to students as they learn to use hand lenses and microscopes to observe a variety of live animals. Students compare the structure of the eye to a microscope. They then use books and charts to identify the creatures they have seen. Food chains and human impacts are discussed.

Squid Anatomy

Through dissection, students explore how squid sense and respond to their environment by examining a squid’s unique physical adaptations, including the exceptionally large eyes. Students also compare and contrast squid to other mollusks such as clams and snails.

Environmental Issues for Grades 3-8

These 45-minute programs introduce students to some of the environmental issues facing the world today/ Students learn about many of the impacts these issues have on our climate, wildlife, ecosystems, everyday living and Long Island Sound. Solutions to current issues are discussed. (Many activities relate to state Social Studies standards too.)

Climate Change

Through an interactive presentation, students learn the differences between climate and weather, the basic of the greenhouse effect, and how carbon cycles through the environment. Through discussion and hands-on activities, students discover how climate change impacts our weather, wildlife and everyday living. They’ll also brainstorm for solutions that can be implemented in their own lives and communities.

Invasive Species

An ecosystem is composed of all populations that are living in a certain space and the physical factors with which they interact. The introduction of non-native plants or animals can have a negative impact on an ecosystem. Students will take part in fun hands-on activities while exploring the environmental impacts of invasive species that can now be found in Long Island Sound. Students also will learn what they can do to prevent further spreading of exotic species.

Water Pollution

Most precipitation that falls in Connecticut eventually reaches Long Island Sound. This water moving across and through the earth carries with it the products of human activities. With Long Island Sound’s extensive watershed as an example, discover the impact of humans on aquatic ecosystems. Students will share their observations as they “pollute” a watershed model, then look for ways to clean it up. Hands-on discovery of basic scientific and ecological concepts.

Traveling Teacher for Large Goups

Dr. LivingSound® Traveling Science Show!

For Grades 2-6

This lively 45-minute program, for up to 200 students, incorporates drama, surprise and humor to introduce students to Long Island Sound’s environment and the issues that concern it. Our Dr. LivingSound® character (played by a Maritime Aquarium educator) draws students into hands-on demonstrations that teach how science connects to the marine world. Using water as its central topic, “the good doctor” introduces students to the Sound’s watershed, explains the water cycle and examines the different ways we use water.
Cost is $525. Discounts available for multiple presentations on the same day: $275 each additional presentation. Additional charges may include a “layover fee” for gaps of one hour or more between classes, travel charges, and any parking fees.

Touch Tank for a Day!

A great bonus for Field Days, Science Fairs or Family Nights
We’ll set up a supervised touch tank with live tidal-pool creatures and animal artifacts. A great hands-on learning-station enhancement to any event!
Cost: $165 for the first hour, $100 for second hour, $95 for third hour and $90 for each additional hour.

Long Island Sound Day

We can arrange a day at your school so that several grades, or all students, can experience our unique program.
Our Long Island Sound Day includes an initial indoor assembly program (for up to 200) with a PowerPoint presentation, then in one-hour blocks students can rotate through a variety of stations that include our live tide-pool animals. Other stations could include topics on whales, sharks or invasive species.
Cost: $300 for initial assembly/ set-up, $200 per hour thereafter. Travel charges may also apply. For more information, call (203) 852-0700, ext. 2271.

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Field Programs

Field-Program-at-Cove-Beach

These programs get students out in nature, where they’ll practice developing their science-inquiry, literacy and numeracy skills. Please note special prices and times. For a Field Ecology program conducted at your site, adjacent free parking is required. Travel fees may apply. School must pay parking fees.

Also:

  • Aquarium admission is optional.
  • If you have more than 28 students, you must book multiple programs.
  • The 7:1 student:chaperone ratio applies.
  • Field Ecology programs are conducted only around low tide. Students will get their feet wet! Wear boots or shoes that can get soggy, and dress for the weather!

Grades K – 2

Visit to the Seashore

Students get out to the water’s edge for the excitement of being “in the field.” They’ll use their senses – plus some scientific sampling techniques – during a discovery tour looking for – and learning about – living and non-living things at the sandy shore, rocky shore and tidal marsh habitats. Explore a Long Island Sound shoreline near The Maritime Aquarium or at your local beach. (School must supply beach entry pass, if necessary.) 2 hours.
Standards: CT: 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 8, 10; NY: all; NJ: all.


Grades 3 – 6

Shoreline Exploration

Explore a Long Island Sound shoreline near The Maritime Aquarium or at your local beach. (School must supply beach entry pass, if necessary.) Learn about the geological processes that helped create our tidal marshes, rocky shores and sandy beaches. Students use scientific equipment to collect animals and test water composition, then consider the changing habitats, varying needs and adaptations of animals living in these marine environments. Other topics include tides, invasive species and habitat conservation. 2 hours.
Standards: CT: 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10; NY: all; NJ: all.

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Childrens Theater and Museum of Maine.jpg
142 Free St, Portland, ME 04101, United States

Located in the Arts District of downtown Portland, the Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine features a wide variety of interactive exhibits and activities for children and families! The Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine exists to inspire discovery and imagination through exploration and play.

The Museum & Theatre serves as an indispensable resource for families and educators, helping to create a broad community devoted to our children’s development and learning.

The Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine serves as an indispensable resource for educators. In addition to inspiring discovery and imagination through exploration and play, we offer a variety of educator-led school programs. All programs are linked to the Maine Learning Results and can be adapted to suit the needs of your students. Group visits allow your students to learn through play while exploring the Museum & Theatre. Adding an optional educational program can enhance your group’s experience, teaching your students about science, culture, arts and theatre with hands-on, artifact-rich learning experiences. Our educators are eager to make your job easier – please let us know how we can best serve your needs and the needs of your students!

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Youth Group Programs 

Onsite Programs & Group Visits

onsite science and animal education

Kids on the Block puppet show

The Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine serves as an indispensable resource for educators. In addition to inspiring discovery and imagination through exploration and play, we offer a variety of educator-led school programs. Group visits allow your students to learn through play while exploring the Museum & Theatre. Adding a program can enhance your group’s experience, teaching your students about science, culture, arts and theatre with hands-on, artifact-rich learning experiences. Our educators are eager to make your job easier – please let us know how we can best serve your needs and the needs of your students!

BOOKING A VISIT TO THE MUSEUM

Reservations

Group reservations must be confirmed with a Museum & Theatre staff person at least 24 hours in advance. Please begin by clicking the appropriate link below to submit your group reservation request. A staff member will contact you to confirm that your requested time is available, arrange the details of your visit and process payment.

Click here to complete an online request form for a Group Visit.

Click here to complete an online request form for a Group Visit with a Program.

Schedule

Schedule a two-hour visit on Tuesday through Friday (9am-5pm).

Group Size

Groups of 10 or more are eligible for group admission rates.

Rates

$6 per person for a two hour visit to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own!

$7 per person for a two hour visit plus a program: visit includes time to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own.

Two adults per 10 children are admitted free. Payment can be made on the day of the visit. Checks, credit cards and purchase orders are accepted.

Special Offer!

Receive $0.50 off each admission when your group visits in September, October, January or February.

During our programs, our educators share a variety of scientific and cultural resources with your group, encouraging hands-on learning, discovery and engagement.

We frequently revise our programs to ensure a high quality experience for students and educators. If you have booked a program in the past and you want to be sure that specific features are still included, please discuss your expectations at the time of booking.

THEATRE PERFORMANCES FOR GROUPS

Group Size

Groups of 10 or more are eligible for group ticket rates.

Groups up to 65 total adults and children may book a theatre performance.

Rates

Advance payment is required for theatre productions.

$7 per person for a 45 minute performance

$13 per person for a 45 minute performance plus play time: visit includes time to explore the Museum & Theatre on your own.

$400 to book a private show (1 month advance payment required; additional play time not included; audience max of 65)

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR GROUPS

Science, Arts and Culture Programs

Camera Obscura

Ideal for grades K to Adult

How do our eyes really work? Find out inside of our Camera Obscura, a room-sized optical exhibit demonstrating principles of light, perspective and vision. Discover the similarities between cameras, our eyeballs and periscopes in this interactive show, then create a collaborative piece of camera obscura art to take back to your classroom.

Color Matters

Ideal for grades K to 5

Markers, magazines and cameras all process color, but in very different ways. Investigate the world of color systems at a series of interactive art and science stations. We’ll find that there is much more to color than what meets the eye!

Prehistoric Fossil Detectives

Ideal for grades K to 5

What is a fossil, and what can it tell us? Experience the life of a fossil through dramatic play, and then explore our collection of prehistoric fossil replicas to determine which creatures they once belonged to. You’ll get to touch and examine real dinosaur fossils!

Maine Animal Adaptations

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 3

Discover an array of Maine animal adaptations using drama and real artifacts from the Museum & Theatre’s collection. Compare the natural abilities and limitations of a variety of animals – even humans! Handle amazing animal artifacts like a moose antler, a turtle shell, mammal teeth, skulls and furs.

Meet the Turtles!

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

Learn about the anatomy and biology of various turtles and tortoises from land and sea. Explore real turtle artifacts like shells and skulls. Make your own observations when you get up close and personal with our yellow-bellied slider turtles.

Ocean Exploration: An Interactive Puppet Show

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 3

Learn about the ocean through the eyes of a little clownfish who’s going on a big adventure! Pretending we’re ocean creatures, we’ll explore everything from the shallowest tidepool to the darkest depths of the midnight zone.

Recycle Challenge

Ideal for grades K to 5

Reduce, reuse, recycle! We’ll explore these important conservation concepts in all sorts of playful ways. Have a recycle relay race, witness amazing recycling transformations and discover nature’s own recyclers.

Rock Cycle

Ideal for grades K to 5

Geology, art and mystery converge when we uncover the three stages of the rock cycle. Build your own model rock from scratch to learn how rocks compose our earth and discover all the ways they are part of our daily lives. Work in teams to explore mysterious situations and identify rocks, gems or fossils. View, touch and investigate rock and mineral specimens from the Museum & Theatre’s collection.

Simple Machines

Ideal for grades K to 5

When you use simple machines to solve silly problems, you earn superhero powers! Learn how to find practical solutions to real world problems and make work easier by rotating through six simple machine model stations.

StarLab: The Science of Constellations

Ideal for grades K to 5

What is a star made of? How did the ancients use the stars like a compass? Learn about the intersection between science and culture by observing the night sky in our mini planetarium. We’ll also analyze a set of stars and make up our own constellation myth. Choose a cultural theme: Greek, Navajo/Dine* or Chinese.

Navajo/Dine available September-March only

The Story of Istar the Whale

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 2

Using large format illustrated story cards we’ll share the life story of Istar, a real humpback whale who lives in the Atlantic Ocean. Learn about her daily routine, including what she eats, the places she travels, and with whom she spends her time. After learning about this famous whale’s life, we’ll go inside an inflatable 45 foot, life-size replica of her body.

We Are Maine: Explore India

Ideal for grades K to 5

Learn about India through the eyes of Jaharanara, a Maine child who has Indian family roots. You’ll explore aspects of Indian culture with your senses. We’ll smell aromatic spices, listen to Bollywood music and even learn to write a word in Hindi.

Whale Science

Ideal for grades 1 to 5

Compare and contrast the size of whale intestine, vertebrae and brain to those of a human. Discover differences between whales and dolphins by investigating real whale baleen. Learn about the many ways humpback whales travel through and adapt to their environments in order to survive. Then take a trip inside of Istar, our life-size inflatable humpback whale.

Worm Bin Workshop

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

Red wiggler worms make great neighbors! When a bin full of wrigglers moves into your classroom, they turn leftover scraps from lunches and snacks into rich compost for indoor and outdoor plants and gardens. In this workshop, we’ll learn about all kinds of worms, including red wrigglers, and the science behind Vermicomposting. At the end of the program, your group will have its own ready-to-use worm bin and the skills to keep it healthy and productive.

Additional materials fee: $50/bin

Theatre Programs

The Kids on the Block © Puppet Shows

Ideal for grades K to 5

Kids on the Block © is nationwide disability awareness program. In short skits, Bunraku puppets with different abilities, personalities, families and backgrounds help us break down boundaries and accept individual differences. Each program includes two skits; following each skit, students can ask the puppets questions and meet the puppeteers. Each skit explores a different topic related to health, safety or disability. Examples include cerebral palsy, visual impairment and Down syndrome.

Take the Stage

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

We’ll bring a familiar story to life with a series of improvisational theatre games. In this inclusive dramatic experience, everyone has a chance to build confidence and work as a team and take the stage! Create memorable interactive learning experiences that inspire students to think creatively, work cooperatively and make connections. Teachers and students will become familiar with process drama techniques that are versatile and easy to apply in the classroom. Choose from the following featured stories: The Three Little PigsWhere the Wild Things Are; and Cinderella.

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Group Programs (Outreach)

Outreach Programs

Meet Istar the whale!

The Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine can come to you! Outreach programs and performances bring the Museum & Theatre’s resources and expertise directly to your school.

The cost for an outreach program is $100 per program (exceptions noted in blue), plus mileage. There is a two program minimum beyond 10 miles and a three program minimum beyond 25 miles of the Museum & Theatre. Programs can accommodate a maximum of 25 students unless otherwise noted.

Reservations: To book an Outreach Program please begin by clicking the link below to submit your program request. A staff member will contact you to confirm that your requested time is available, arrange the details of your program and process payment.

Please note: We frequently revise our school programs to ensure a high quality experience for students and educators. If you have booked a program in the past and you want to be sure that specific features are still included, please discuss your expectations at the time of booking.

OUTREACH PROGRAMS FROM THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM & THEATRE OF MAINE

Arts, Science and Culture

Maine Animal Adaptations

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 3

Discover an array of Maine animal adaptations using drama and real artifacts from the Museum & Theatre’s collection. Compare the natural abilities and limitations of a variety of animals – even humans! Handle amazing animal artifacts like a moose antler, a turtle shell, mammal teeth, skulls and furs.

Prehistoric Fossil Detectives

Ideal for grades K to 5

What is a fossil, and what can it tell us? Experience the life of a fossil through dramatic play, and then explore our collection of prehistoric fossil replicas to determine which creatures they once belonged to. You’ll get to touch and examine real replicas of dinosaur fossils!

Recycle Challenge

Ideal for grades K to 5

Reduce, reuse, recycle! We’ll explore these important conservation concepts in all sorts of playful ways. Have a recycle relay race, witness amazing recycling transformations and discover nature’s own recyclers.

Rock Cycle

Ideal for grades K to 5

Geology, art and mystery converge when we uncover the three stages of the rock cycle. Build your own model rock from scratch to learn how rocks compose our earth and discover all the ways they are part of our daily lives. Work in teams to explore mysterious situations and identify rocks, gems or fossils. View, touch and investigate rock and mineral specimens from the Museum & Theatre’s collection.

Simple Machines

Ideal for grades K to 5

When you use simple machines to solve silly problems, you earn superhero powers! Learn how to find practical solutions to real world problems and make work easier by rotating through six simple machine model stations.

StarLab: The Science of Constellations

Ideal for grades K to 5

What is a star made of? How did the ancients use the stars like a compass? Learn about the intersection between science and culture by observing the night sky in our mini planetarium. We’ll also analyze a set of stars and make up our own constellation myth. Choose a cultural theme: Greek, Navajo/Dine* or Chinese.

Navajo/Dine available September-March only ($125)

The Story of Istar the Whale

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 2

Using large format illustrated story cards we’ll share the life story of Istar, a real humpback whale who lives in the Atlantic Ocean. Learn about her daily routine, including what she eats, the places she travels, and who she spends her time with. After learning about this famous whale’s life, we’ll go inside an inflatable 45 foot, life-size replica of her body.

This program requires a large space such as a gymnasium or cafeteria. Istar can be inflated outdoors, but the interior cannot be accessed during outdoor use. ($150)

We Are Maine: Explore India

Ideal for grades K to 5

Learn about India through the eyes of Jaharanara, a real child in Maine who has Indian family roots. You’ll explore aspects of Indian culture with your senses. We’ll smell aromatic spices, listen to Bollywood music and even learn to write a word in Hindi.

Whale Science

Ideal for grades 1 to 5

Compare and contrast the size of whale intestine, vertebrae and brain to those of a human. Discover differences between whales and dolphins by investigating real whale baleen. Learn about the many ways humpback whales travel through and adapt to their environments in order to survive. Then take a trip inside of Istar, our life-size inflatable humpback whale.
This program requires a large space such as a gymnasium or cafeteria. Istar can be inflated outdoors, but the interior cannot be accessed during outdoor use. ($150)

Worm Bin Workshop

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

Red wiggler worms make great neighbors! When a bin full of wrigglers moves into your classroom, they turn leftover scraps from lunches and snacks into rich compost for indoor and outdoor plants and gardens. In this workshop, we’ll learn about all kinds of worms, including red wrigglers, and the science behind Vermicomposting. At the end of the program, your group will have its own ready-to-use worm bin and the skills to keep it healthy and productive.

Additional materials fee: $50/bin

Theatre Programs

The Kids on the Block© Puppet Shows

Ideal for grades K to 5
Kids on the Block © is nationwide disability awareness program. In short skits, Bunraku puppets with different abilities, personalities, families and backgrounds help us break down boundaries and accept individual differences. Each program includes two skits; following each skit, students can ask the puppets questions and meet the puppeteers. Each skit explores a different topic related to health, safety or disability. Examples include cerebral palsy, visual impairment and Down syndrome.

No maximum number of students

Stories of Kindness

Ideal for grades 2 to 5

One of the most effective ways to combat bullying is to celebrate kindness. With playback theatre – a simple improvisational theatre technique – we can use movement, sound and our own unique voices to reflect our best experiences and share stories of kindness. This program was developed with the help of nationally recognized anti-bullying expert Stan Davis as part of Youth Voices, a project dedicated to encouraging resiliency and celebrating positive peer experiences.

Take the Stage

Ideal for grades Pre-K to 5

We’ll bring a familiar story to life with a series of improvisational theatre games. In this inclusive dramatic experience, everyone has a chance to build confidence and work as a team and take the stage! Create memorable interactive learning experiences that inspire students to think creatively, work cooperatively and make connections. Teachers and students will become familiar with process drama techniques that are versatile and easy to apply in the classroom. Choose from the following featured stories: The Three Little PigsWhere the Wild Things Are or Cinderella.

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Scout Troops: Overnights and After-Hours Workshops

an event to remember

Did you ever wonder what happens in the Museum at night? Did you know that the Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine hosts after-hours workshops and sleepover camp-ins for Scouts and other recreation groups? Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts can earn badges and achievements through special workshops while exploring the Museum & Theatre when we’re closed to the public.

 

CREATE A CUSTOM EVENT FOR YOUR TROOP

ATTEND A COUNCIL-SPONSORED EVENT AND MEET OTHER SCOUTS

 


CUSTOM EVENTS FOR YOUR TROOP

We can work with you to create a custom adventure that’s just right for your Scouts. Whether your Scouts want to earn badges or just explore the Museum at night, we can plan a one-of-a-kind overnight or after-hours workshop that meets your needs.

(Looking to visit as a group during our regular hours? See our Onsite Programs and Group Visits page for info.)

GROUP OVERNIGHTS

You and your group will participate in a number of activities presented by our educators, have a late night snack and set up camp anywhere among our three floors of exhibits!

Overnights can be reserved any Saturday night (book early for best availability).

They begin at 5:30pm and run until 9am the following morning.

AFTER-HOURS WORKSHOPS

For children who are interested in attending a Museum & Theatre program after hours but who are not quite ready for an overnight, we offer evening workshops.

Evening workshops can be reserved any evening of the week (book early for best availability).
They begin at 5:30pm and end at 8:30pm.

PRICING AND RESERVATIONS

Pricing

The cost of an overnight is $26 per child and $14 per adult, with a minimum fee of $625.

Evening workshops are $12 per child and $4 per adult, with a minimum fee of $370.

Reservations

To start the reservation process, contact Louisa at 207-828-1234 x227 or louisa@kitetails.org.

SCOUT EVENT GUIDELINES AND POLICIES

Group Size
For overnights and workshops, we require a minimum of 25 children (or a minimum fee of $625) and can accomodate no more than 60 children. We require one adult chaperone for every three children. (Some exceptions can be made; contact Louisa to inquire.) If this isn’t the right fit for your group’s size, consider a group visit with a guided program during regular hours, or seeing a theatre production as a group.

Sleeping Arrangements

Children and chaperones will have assigned sleeping areas within our exhibits, including the fire truck, space shuttle and Discovery Woods. Small groups may be permitted to choose their own sleeping areas.

Food

Participants supply their own evening snack. (No nuts, please!) A breakfast is served the following morning which includes cereal, fruit and juice. Please make notation on medical forms if a child has specific dietary needs.

Shopping

There will be time in the morning to shop for Museum souvenirs.

Cancellation Policy

Decisions to cancel due to inclement weather will be made by the Museum & Theatre the day of the scheduled event. Museum staff will call the Troop or Pack contact that scheduled the event and notify them of cancellations. Deposits for weather-related cancellations will be credited toward a re-scheduled event. The Museum & Theatre reserves the right to cancel a workshop or overnight in the event registration does not meet minimum enrollment up to two weeks prior to the event. If cancelled, we will do our best to re-schedule or a full refund will be issued. If the reserving group cancels the reservation with less than two weeks’ notice, the $100 deposit will not be refunded.

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New Hampshire Farmers Museum.jpg
1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton, NH, United States

The New Hampshire Farm Museum is a non-profit 501 c3 educational organization dedicated to preserving, promoting and carrying forward New Hampshire’s rural and agricultural heritage. The New Hampshire Farm Museum consists of two adjoining farmsteads situated on 50 acres located on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, New Hampshire. The historic Jones Farm and the Plummer Homestead are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and were passed down in the same families for two centuries. The Museum operates a working farm growing heirloom varieties of vegetables for our Community Supported Agriculture Program and for sale in our Country store. We raise hens for eggs and keep a small selection of heritage breed farm animals to support our educational efforts. We have displays of agricultural implements and educational exhibits on rural life and agriculture for the visiting public and our many visiting school children. We offer guided tours of the historic Jones farmhouse as well as farm animal tours. Special events and programs, workshops, and day camps are offered throughout the year.

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Planning Your Group Visit

School, homeschools, scouting or camp groups are all welcome at the New Hampshire Farm Museum We need a minimum of 10 children or $60. to run a program. The museum accepts school and youth group visits from May 1st through December. Visits can be scheduled Tuesday through Friday 9:00 am to 4:00 pm depending on the program.

To Schedule Your Visit : Please call 603-652-7840 or email: info@farmmuseum.org.

We recommend one chaperon per ten students. Chaperons or home school parents are charged at half the student rate. There is no charge for teachers, group leaders, counselors or bus drivers or children ages 3 and under. In good weather students can pack a lunch to eat in our picnic area. We have an outdoor handicapped accessible restroom/port-a-potty. We can show students historic games like hoop rolling and graces for all to play with during lunch. We welcome students to shop in our Country Store if permitted during lunch break. The store contains many inexpensive items, educational toys, juice and soda, penny candy and farm grown produce and eggs.

School and Youth Programs at the NH Farm Museum

The New Hampshire Farm Museum provides a wonderful, hands-on opportunity for your students to explore New Hampshire’s agricultural heritage and see where farming and technology intersect with New Hampshire history.  Students who visit the museum have the opportunity to tour a working organic farm and learn about agricultural practices such as the “three sisters”, a method of co-planting corn, beans, and squash that the European settlers learned from the Native Americans. In addition to being a working farm, the museum is home to a vast collection of historic agricultural implements and artifacts of rural life including Daniel Webster’s plow and Horace Greeley’s privy and two historic farmhouses. No visit is complete without a chance to interact with the heritage breed farm animals!

Any of the following educational programs offered by the museum can be easily adapted to fit your curriculum and meet your class’s specific needs.

The Ox-Cart Man: Farms & Families at Work 

Program recommended for grades k-3. Offered May-mid-November. Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum, Approx. 3 hours

In this hands-on program based on NH poet Donald Hall’s story, The Ox-Cart Man, children explore the way families lived and worked in the past throughout rural New England. The students tour the 18th-century farmhouse cape and learn about the roles of each member of the household and how each was needed to make the family’s living. In gathering farm products to bring to market, they learn about the artifacts and objects of daily life in Colonial times. On their hunt through the barn they search for many of the farm objects depicted in the story and learn about barter and trade. Students make butter, meet our sheep, chickens, turkeys and pig, work with wool, try a planting or harvesting activity and help pack the ox-cart for the trip to Portsmouth.

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: Rural Life & Technological/Agricultural Evolution 

Program recommended for students grades 3-8. Offered May-mid-November Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum. Approx. 3 hours

The Jones Farmstead consists of a set of connected farm buildings referred to in an old children’s rhyme as, “Big House, little house, back house, barn.” Each piece of this connected farm structure tells a different story about New Hampshire history from Colonial times to the Twentieth century. In this hands-on program students learn about rural life and technological and agricultural change in New England as they tour the historic farmhouse, hunt for artifacts in the barn, and participate in farm chores. Students will view “Hands to Work,” a short film which uses oral histories and historic photographs of New Hampshire farming. They will try farm chores like grinding corn, carrying water with a yoke, and doing the wash. They will visit the farm animals and make butter. This program can be used supplement lessons on the transition from farms to factories as part of economic evolution or adapted to fit a range of other learning goals.

Hands to Work Program for Pre-schoolers

Program recommended for children ages 3-5 yrs. Offered May through mid-November. Cost: $5 per child. 10 student minimum- maximum: 25. Approx. 2 hours.

Children will learn all about the work on the farm and how the children helped in this completely hands-on program for pre-schoolers. They will grind the corn to feed the chickens, do the wash with washtub and wringer, pump the water at the well, feel the wool from the sheep, churn the cream to make butter, plant a seed or harvest the vegetables depending on the season and explore the Big Yellow Barn to hunt for fun things related to the farm.

An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving on the Farm 

Program recommended for children grades K – 5. Offered November 1st through November 20th. Cost: $7 per child 10 student minimum- maximum 45. Approx. 2 ½ hours.

New Hampshire has a special connection to Thanksgiving as it was our own Sarah Josepha Hale who persuaded President Lincoln in 1863 to declare it a National Holiday. Students will enjoy a tour through the historic farmhouse with costumed roleplayers portraying the Civil War Era. Then they will learn to grind and pound flint corn to make our cornbread and to churn cream into butter for our bread and press apples to make cider for us to drink. We will also explore the 104 ft. long great barn on a special barn hunt and visit with our heritage breed turkeys and other farm animals.

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Florida Museum of Natural History Logo.jpg
3215 Hull Road, Gainesville, FL, United States

Enjoy hundreds of exotic butterflies in a rain forest setting, witness a South Florida Calusa Indian welcoming ceremony, experience a life-size limestone cave and see a mammoth and mastodon from the last ice age.

Located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville and open year round, the Florida Museum is one of the nation’s top five museums with more than 34 million specimens, including one of the world’s largest collections of butterflies and moths.

Visitors are greeted by a 14-foot-tall, 16,000-year-old Columbian Mammoth discovered in the Aucilla River in northwest Florida. Ninety percent of the bones are fossil material, making it one of the most complete ever found.

Visitors in front of mammoth

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Guided Tour Options

Join a knowledgeable Museum docent or staff member for an in-depth tour and lecture of the Museum exhibits and related areas. Available from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. These tours are currently geared for an adult audience.

Butterfly Rainforest Exhibit Guided Tour

$11.50/person, 25 people max.

This tour is led by a Butterfly Rainforest staff member and lasts approximately 30 to 45 minutes. Information provided covers butterfly identification, the life cycle, nectar plants and other food sources in the landscaping, and Rearing Laboratory operations.

Butterfly Rainforest Exhibit VIP Tour

$20/person, 12-15 people max.

The VIP tour is led by the Butterfly Rainforest Exhibit Manager and lasts approximately one hour. The tour begins with the “Wall of Wings” display and information about the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity collections, and continues through the Butterfly Rainforest with information on butterfly identification and lifecycle, and nectar plants and other food sources in the landscaping. The VIP tour ends with a behind-the-scenes look in the Rearing Lab and information about its operations.

Florida Fossils Exhibit Guided Tour

$3/person, 40 people max.

Drawing upon the Florida Museum’s internationally acclaimed fossil collections, the award-winning Florida Fossils: Evolution of Life & Land exhibit describes the last 65 million years of Florida’s history. Walk through time beginning with the Eocene, when Florida was underwater, to the Pleistocene when the first humans arrived. Piece together a mystery skeleton to learn how paleontologists use fossils to understand periods of geologic time. This tour lasts approximately 60-90 minutes.

Florida’s Indian Peoples Exhibit Guided Tour

$3/person, 40 people max.

Archaeological evidence suggests people arrived in Florida about 12,000 years ago. Since then, Florida has been home to many groups of Indians including the powerful, extinct Calusa and the Seminoles and Miccosukee of today. How do we know about these people and their environment? Try your hand at rope making and examine artifacts while searching for answers to this question in three exhibits: South Florida People & Environments, Northwest Florida: Waterways & Wildlife and Dugout Canoes: Paddling through the America. This tour lasts approximately 60-90 minutes.

Highlights Guided Tour

$3/person, 40 people max.

Want to see it all? This special tour highlights selected sections of the Florida Museum’s world-renowned permanent exhibitions including Florida Fossils: Evolution of Life & LandSouth Florida People & Environment and Northwest Florida: Waterways & Wildlife. This tour lasts approximately 60 minutes.

Self-Guided Group Rates

Suitable for groups that prefer independent exploration of the Museum. Community Group rates available Monday through Friday for groups of 10 or more.

Free admission* to all exhibits except the Butterfly Rainforest and Surfing Florida/Surf Science. Children under three (3) admitted free.

Exhibit Dates Adult Child (3-17)
Butterfly Rainforest Year Round $7.50 $5.50
Surfing Florida/Surf Science 8/31/2013 — 1/20/2014 $3.50 $3
Best Value! Dates Adult Child (3-17)
Surfing Florida/Surf Science
& Butterfly Rainforest
8/31/2013 — 1/20/2014 $10.50 $8

Donations are accepted; suggested amounts are $6 for adults and $4 for children. Admission donations help support the Museum’s exhibitions and education programs.

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Scout Explorations

Let the Museum be a part of your scouting experience! Sign up your Boy or Girl Scout group for a weekend program to earn part or all of the requirements for many different badges, journeys, belt loops and pins.

Boy Scouts (Coming Soon!)

Cub Scouts: Wildlife Conservation (belt loop and pin), Collecting (belt loop and info for pin)

Boy Scouts: Collecting, Indian Lore, Insect Study, Archaeology, Basketry, Bird Study

Girl Scouts

Brownies trying digging activity

Brownies:

Journeys: WOW, Brownie Quest, A World of Girls

Skill Building Badges: Bugs, Home Scientist, Senses, Inventor

Juniors:

Journeys: Get Moving!, Agent of Change, aMUSE

Skill Building Badges: Flowers, Detective, Animal Habitats

Registration Information

Available times: Saturday 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 2-4 p.m.; Sunday 2-4 p.m.

Each program requires a minimum of 10 scouts with a maximum of 20. The Museum requires a 10 to 1 ratio of scouts per chaperone for all programs.

A deposit of $50 is required to reserve your troop’s spot.  Fees for all participants must be paid in one payment on the day of or before the program. The cost is $15 per scout and chaperones are free*.

Refunds will be made for cancellations received 5 business days before the scheduled program, minus a $20 administrative fee. Refunds will not be made for weather-related cancellations.

* There is an additional fee for programs that utilize the Butterfly Rainforest.

Please contact Amanda Harvey with your questions or to register at aerickson@flmnh.ufl.edu or 352-273-2062.

Make sure to check the Calendar of Events for all of our scout-friendly events where you can use the experience to work towards your belt loops, pins and badges!

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Outreach Programs at Florida Museum of Natural History (All Grades)

Bring the Museum to your classroom!

The Florida Museum of Natural History currently offers five Inquiry Box outreach programs for use in the classroom. A free 45-minute educational program using artifacts and natural history objects is delivered by museum staff or volunteers to enhance science and social studies lessons or Museum field trips.

Download Inquiry Boxes Flier

Inquiry Boxes may be kept in your classroom for two (2) weeks at a cost of $25/box, allowing students to further examine the hands-on items and other materials included in the box. Teachers will be responsible for returning the Inquiry Boxes to the Museum.

To reserve an Inquiry Box and presentation, please email carlislej@flmnh.ufl.edu or call 352-273-2026.

Outreach programs Available

Florida’s Butterflies & Moths

Suitable for: All ages but geared to K-4th grade

Participants will:

  • Learn about the life cycle of butterflies and moths.
  • Learn how butterflies and moths are similar and different.
  • Examine actual moths and butterflies found in Florida and discuss sizes, colors, and body parts.
  • Gain a better understanding of how important camouflage and adaptation methods are for survival.
  • Understand that Lepidoptera have scales covering their wings.
  • Experience how Lepidoptera see with their compound eyes.

The Florida’s Butterflies and Moths Inquiry Box (a large plum duffle bag) contains books (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, word cards, laminated teaching aids and a teacher’s guide (including a suggested approach sheet). This Inquiry Box features 14 shared boxes, each designed to be explored by 1-3 students.

Inquiry Box contents - Butterflies and Moths

Each shared box contains:

  • One clear plastic box containing 1 of 4 Florida butterflies
  • One box containing 1 of 3 Florida moths
  • Packet of cards for identifying the above (Within the 14 boxes, there are 7 different Florida moths and butterflies.)
  • 2 magnifying glasses
  • 2 eyepiece teleidoscopes
  • Packet of plastic life cycle parts
  • Butterfly finger puppet
  • This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

Educators’ Guide & Recommended Reading

 

Florida’s Reptiles & Amphibians

Suitable for: All ages but geared to K-3rd grade

Participants will:

  • Discover the great variety of reptiles and amphibians that make their home in Florida: crocodilians, snakes, lizards, turtles, frogs and salamanders.
  • Learn how reptiles and amphibians are the same and how they are different.
  • Hold a snake shed and learn why and how snakes shed their skin.
  • Learn what a tadpole is and how it is part of the transformation from egg to frog through the process called metamorphosis.
  • Discover the difference between warm blooded and cold blooded animals by using a simple thermometer.

The Florida’s Reptiles and Amphibian Inquiry Box (2 green suitcases) contains books (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, 6 replicas, word cards, laminated teaching aids and a teacher’s guide (including a suggested approach sheet). This Inquiry Box features 14 shared boxes, each designed to be explored by 1-3 students.

Inquiry Box contents - Reptiles & Amphibians

Each box contains:

  • Envelope A contains a real snake shed
  • Envelope B has a hands on camouflage activity
  • Envelope C contains a flat thermometer
  • Envelope D contains 6 frog metamorphosis cards
  • 2 sock puppets
  • Replica of a snapping turtle

This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

Florida’s Seminole People

Suitable for: All ages but geared to K-5th grade

Participants will:

  • Learn about the way of life of the Seminole people of Florida, both today and when the word Seminole first came into use.
  • Explore customs, clothing, food sources, housing, economics and government as a way to learn about these early Floridians.
  • Find out how adaptability and resourcefulness have led to the survival of the Seminole culture, after only a few Seminole escaped attempts at deportation.
  • Try on a Seminole vest or skirt and learn how the sewing machine changed the traditional clothing.

Inquiry Box contents - Florida's Seminole People

The Florida’s Seminole Peoples Inquiry Box (a black suitcase) contains books, (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, word cards, laminated pictures and teaching aids, replicas, sweetgrass basket, Seminole doll, patchwork samples, a vest and/or skirt, and more. There is a teacher’s guide which includes a suggested approach sheet. There are many hands-on articles along with a bingo-type game.

This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

 Teacher’s Guide to Florida’s Native People

This teacher’s guide may be used for Inquiry Box presentations, Inquiry Box loans and museum visits. The guide contains information on Florida’s Indian people, information on associated subjects and related fields of study, vocabulary and suggested activities. All activities are designed to integrate social studies, language arts, math and science in a unified learning experience. Permission is granted to reproduce the information and activities for student and teacher use. All guides are in PDF format.

Northern Florida’s Early Native People

Suitable for: All ages but geared to 3rd-5th grade

Participants will:

  • Investigate the lives of Florida’s early native peoples from the hunting-and-gathering Paleoindians to the farming Apalachee and Timucuan peoples.
  • Learn about their culture, community, clothing, games, houses, tools, food and trade items.
  • Find out how life changed in Florida after the arrival of European explorers.
  • Hold and explore replicas and ancient artifacts.

The Florida’s Northern Early Native People Inquiry Box (2 large royal blue suitcases) contains books (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, word cards, laminated teaching aids and a teacher’s guide (including a suggested approach sheet). This Inquiry Box features 14 shared boxes, each designed to be explored by 1-3 students.

Inquiry Box contents - North Florida Early Native People

Each shared box contains:

  • Celt
  • Chunky stone
  • Owl totem replica
  • Food packet (corn kernel, pumpkin seeds, dried bean, jerky, seashell, sunflower seed, peach pit, fish bones, acorns, shark tooth, and peas)
  • Trade bag (bell, glass beads, jewelry, mica, potsherd, quartzite, seashells, shark tooth, and string)
  • 2 pieces of terra cotta clay
  • Packet with fibers for cord making

This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

Teacher’s Guide to Florida’s Native People

This teacher’s guide may be used for Inquiry Box presentations, Inquiry Box loans and museum visits. The guide contains information on Florida’s Indian people, information on associated subjects and related fields of study, vocabulary and suggested activities. All activities are designed to integrate social studies, language arts, math and science in a unified learning experience. Permission is granted to reproduce the information and activities for student and teacher use. All guides are in PDF format.

Southern Florida’s Early Native People

Suitable for: All ages but geared to 3rd-5th grade

Participants will:

  • Discover the people who inhabited South Florida, descendants of the Paleoindians and Archaic people who came to Florida thousands of years ago.
  • See replicas of early Indian crafts – a wooden Ivory Billed Woodpecker plaque, a mask, a hammer, a scoop and the feline statue.
  • Find out what middens (old trash heaps) tell us about diet, culture, and climate.
  • Learn how the early people made cord and rope.
  • Read a translation from Spanish records about the Calusa.
  • Handle ancient tool artifacts – points, knives, drills, and scrapers.

The Southern Florida Early Native People Inquiry Box (a large red suitcase and a small red duffle bag) contains books (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, word cards, laminated teaching aids, replicas, artifacts, a timeline, a game, a sorting tray and a teacher’s guide (including a suggested approach sheet). This Inquiry Box features 14 shared boxes, each designed to be explored by 1-3 students.

Inquiry Box contents - South Florida Early Native People

Each shared box contains:

  • Sealed packet of 1000+ year old midden
  • Packet fishing gear – hook, net, net gauge, and illustration
  • Packet containing artifacts of tools with identification cards
  • Packet of fiber from which to make cord
  • Replica of the famous feline

This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

Teacher’s Guide to Florida’s Native People

This teacher’s guide may be used for Inquiry Box presentations, Inquiry Box loans and museum visits. The guide contains information on Florida’s Indian people, information on associated subjects and related fields of study, vocabulary and suggested activities. All activities are designed to integrate social studies, language arts, math and science in a unified learning experience. Permission is granted to reproduce the information and activities for student and teacher use. All guides are in PDF format.

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Lutz Children Museum.jpg
247 South Main Street, Manchester, CT 06040, United States

The Lutz Children’s Museum was established to foster imagination, arouse curiosity, and promote museums as resources for life long learning. We strive to provide a multi-faceted museum for children to explore culture, history, and the natural science through internal and external exhibits, programs, and experiences.

Every visit to the Lutz Children’s Museum is exciting because exhibits change frequently and special programs are offered daily. Most exhibits and activities are designed for children ages two through twelve.

The museum’s home is a former schoolhouse. Gallery halls were once classrooms, and the school auditorium is now used for classes, parties, concerts and special events. Downtown Manchester and the historical district are right down the road.

Every visit to the Lutz Children’s Museum is exciting because exhibits change frequently and special programs are offered daily. Most exhibits and activities are designed for children aged two through ten.

The museum’s home is a former schoolhouse. Gallery halls were once classrooms, and the school auditorium is now used for classes, parties, concerts and special events. Downtown Manchester and the historical district are right down the road.

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Visiting the museum is a fun and educational field trip! Come explore our newest exhibit Connecticut Forests, stroll around 1940’s Main Street Manchester, experience 19th Century Manchester Farm Life, or visit some of the wild and domestic animals housed in our Animal Room. Book your group visit in advance and chaperones will be admitted free with groups of ten or more children. One of our museum educators will present an informative forty-five minute educational program of your choice for a fee of $8 per child, which includes museum admission for the day. A self-guided visit without a program is also available for $5 per child. Our programs book quickly. Please book in advance for the best availability.

Science Programs

Boogie Bones
Bring your students to the museum for some scary skeletal fun. Learn about the bones in our bodies, including what they are made of, how they work, and what happens when they break. Compare human bones to other animal bones and see whether we can find any similarities or differences.
Recommended Grades: K-5

Lots of Legs
Animals can get around in many different ways, some with very many legs! In this program, students will learn about animals that have 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 legs. How can we use the number of legs to classify different animals into groups? We will find out and meet some examples from our collection.
Recommended Grades: K-2

Terrific Trees
Trees have a variety of uses for both humans and animals. Students will learn about the different parts of a tree, how to count tree rings, and how to identify some common Connecticut trees by their seeds or leaves. This program includes a short outdoor component, so students should dress appropriately for the weather.
Recommended Grades: 1-4

Humanities Programs

Wildlife Artists
From Rousseau’s fierce jungles to Audubon’s scientific sketches, many artists over the centuries have been inspired by animals. Now is your chance to join their ranks and create some animal artwork of your own! Students will learn about some famous wildlife artists and have the opportunity to observe and sketch a variety of animals that call the Lutz Children’s Museum their home.
Recommended Grades: K-4

Programs Back By Popular Demand

  • Animals of the Night
  • Nutrition
  • Animal Protection
  • Junior Zookeepers
  • Fur, Feathers and Scales
  • Talking Bugs
  • Endangered Species

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Hammond Museum and Japanese Stroll Garden.jpg
28 Deveau Road, North Salem, NY, United States

The Hammond Museum & Japanese Stroll Garden in North Salem is one of only 2 Japanese Gardens open regularly to the public in New York State. The other one is the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in Brooklyn, N. Y. Partly as a result of a 1988 report on the Hammond Museum funded by NYSCA, The Hammond Museum has redefined and focused its mission as an institution that centers on the presentation, illumination and exhibition of Asian art and culture with the Japanese Stroll Garden as the centerpiece of the Museum’s permanent collection. The Museum seeks to develop itself as a resource for students and people wanting to learn about Asian culture and also as a place where people of Asian Heritage may celebrate their cultural background.

The Japanese Garden is a primary resource that needs to be developed along specific lines as a tool for learning. The board of trustees, the staff and volunteers are trained to view the garden as a work of art – not just as a collection of trees and shrubs. Tours of the garden are given with an emphasis on principles of Asian aesthetics and philosophy, not as a horticultural phenomenon. Visitors are asked to make connections with items on exhibit whether they are from the Museum’s permanent collection or on loan.

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Educational Tours

The Hammond Museum is seeking funds to continue Saturday Educational/Craft Activities and to expand and develop this program into the creation of a resource center for students and visitors with primary and secondary multi media research tools in the areax of Asian culture, art and history.The Hammond Museum & Japanese Stroll Garden in North Salem is one of only 2 Japanese Gardens open regularly to the public in New York State. The other one is the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in Brooklyn, N. Y. Partly as a result of a 1988 report on the Hammond Museum funded by NYSCA, The Hammond Museum has redefined and focused its mission as an institution that centers on the presentation, illumination and exhibition of Asian art and culture with the Japanese Stroll Garden as the centerpiece of the Museum’s permanent collection. The Museum seeks to develop itself as a resource for students and people wanting to learn about Asian culture and also as a place where people of Asian Heritage may celebrate their cultural background.The Japanese Garden is a primary resource that needs to be developed along specific lines as a tool for learning. The board of trustees, the staff and volunteers are trained to view the garden as a work of art – not just as a collection of trees and shrubs. Tours of the garden are given with an emphasis on principles of Asian aesthetics and philosophy, not as a horticultural phenomenon. Visitors are asked to make connections with items on exhibit whether they are from the Museum’s permanent collection or on loan.



During the academic year, the Hammond receives requests every week from middle and high school students asking for information on many different aspects of Asian culture. The topics range from Buddhism to Noh theatre. The Museum is only able to direct these students to several Internet sites and to the White Plains Library. The Board is committed to fulfilling the Museum’s reputation as a resource by developing a facility that will use our permanent collection and adjunct materials to answer the research needs and curiosity of the local population.

The Museum is asking for funds to plan and develop a resource center for students and people interested in Asian culture which would use the Garden and other permanent collection items (Fans, prints, kimonos, ceramics) as primary source material. The goal of the Museum is to have this resource center be available to schools during the academic day and to students and visitors during times when the schools.



The importance of first hand experience in the learning process has been amply demonstrated to have a significant impact on students’ understanding of “difficult” subject matter. It is also important for teachers whose own education and experience are dominantly eurocentric to be able to trust and rely on outside resources for backup with this expanded curriculum. This dual role of backing up teachers and making an impact on students is a role that the Hammond Museum is in a unique position to develop.

The current New York State curriculum for the instruction of Global History in the 9th and 10th grade includes significant segments on Asia which seek not only to teach chronologically sequential periods in Asian history but also to develop an understanding of beliefs and cultural aesthetics which developed in the Eastern Hemisphere. In order to successfully complete the Regents examination, students are being asked to understand how the birth of an idea or technology in one part of the world affected the development of mankind in other parts of the world. For instance, students must have an understanding of world religions and how they spread and evolved, including Buddhism and Taoism. By comparing tangible objects with the ideas expressed in the Japanese Garden, students will be better equipped to make the connections and comparisons being asked of them.



The Museum is fortunate in that we will be able to work closely with the students and teachers from the North Salem Schools to monitor and assess the program as it grows. However, we need to call in educational consultants, an architect and curators to plan and develop this unique program which will be an important step in the development of the Museum and also serve the needs of Westchester, Putnam and possibly Dutchess and Rockland Counties.

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FAIRBANKS MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM VT.gif
1302 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, VT, United States

The Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium is much more than Northern New England’s museum of natural history — it is a place to marvel at the wonders of our world.  Perfect for families and visitors of all ages, the Fairbanks Museum invites you to explore your universe.

Inside our classic Victorian building, you’ll find a dazzling array of animals and artifacts, dolls and tools, shells and fossils, and much more! Take a trip through the cosmos in Vermont’s only public planetarium, and see weather forecasts in the works in our Eye on the Sky Weather Gallery. A full calendar of events, workshops, lectures and field programs invites everyone to explore the nature of our world.

 Inside, our collections include some 175,000 objects:

  • 75,000 natural science specimens (mounted birds, mammals, reptiles and fish; insects; nests and eggs; shells; fossils; rocks and minerals; herbarium)
  • 95,000 historical artifacts (tools; toys; dolls; textiles; weapons; archival photographs and documents)
  • 5,000 ethnological items representing Oceania, the Near East, Africa, Egypt, Japan and native North America.

The only public planetarium in the state of Vermont opened in 1961 and continues to offer guided tours of the cosmos every week.

Discover … Explore … Experience … Inspire …

CURRENT EXHIBITS AVAILABLE HERE

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We have prepared a wondrous array of curriculum guides to help teachers and parents create activities within the Museum and beyond its walls. Our aim is to inspire curiosity and self-directed learning, so that children become life-long naturalists, always interested in the world around them.

The Museum’s learning experiences take place in our awe-inspiring galleries, state-of-the-art Lyman Spitzer Jr. Planetarium, Nature Classroom, classic learning hall and outdoor space.

Contact us to plan your visit to the Museum.

For Educators:

The Museum’s Education team is ready to work with you and your school to help your students engage in active learning that excites them. Our curriculum guides are designed to meet VT State Standards.

The Museum is a fabulous and memorable destination for field trips! Let us help you plan this excursion.

Your class or group can come to the Museum for a field trip or for repeated learning experiences. Fees include 1 FREE chaperone for every 5 students.Choose from the following program options:

  • $5/student for a gallery tour
  • $8/student for 1 program
  • $10/student for 2 programs
  • Minimum rates apply for groups with fewer than 10 students.

Click here to plan your visit to the Museum.

Solar Slumber

It is easy to take the Sun for granted.  After all, it NEVER fails to shine, even if the clouds get in the way.  Recently, better technology has permitted astronomers to observe the Sun in great detail, revealing much more about the Sun.  It also shows many things we don’t know about the Sun.  While the Sun’s steady nature makes life on Earth possible, changes in daily, seasonally, and long-term solar activity affects our atmosphere, our satellites, and life on the Earth.

Students will learn to safely view the Sun, weather-permitting, and will observe (live or through images) details on the Sun’s surface.  Students will analyze data to discover patterns of solar activity, and then discuss the possible affects of the Sun on the Earth, including recent information about decreased solar activity.

NGSS: ESS1.A, ESS1.B, PS3

 Solar Slumber
 bell

BOING!

Does sound cause movement?

Does movement make sound?

How does sound travel through the air?

Discover the properties of sound while making some of your own sounds.  Develop basic musical instruments to test your observations.  Using tools and ourselves, we will discover what makes sound and what does not. By the end we will solve the problem of how to use our bodies to demonstrate how sound traverses distance.

NGSS: 1-PS4-1, 1-PS4-4

Werewolves, Vampires and Zombies!

Parasites and Poisons that can control our minds!

Although there are no supernatural monsters in this lesson, we will explore the ways in which real parasites have taken over their hosts, and how they may have inspired monster myths! Have you ever wondered what happens to a person who contracts rabies? Could parasites be responsible for some people’s reckless and dangerous behavior? Could toxins and poisons in nature cause people to behave like monsters themselves? This lesson is ideally suited for Third Grade through Middle School students.

NGSS: 3-LS4, 4-LS1, MS-LS1, MS-LS2, MS-LS3, MS-LS4

 dracula
 

Have a Ball!

What goes up must come down, but that law of motion doesn’t mean all objects travel on or through all surfaces the same.

Your students need only bring their innate curiosity and their creative and critically thinking minds to be ready for this class!

 

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Delve into our Solar System and beyond in the Lyman Spitzer, Jr. Planetarium!

Planetarium experiences can expose your students, club members or community group to the stars and constellations, our moon, the planets, even concepts like orbits and gravity.

Planetarium Topics

  • Our Solar System
  • American Indian Star Stories
  • Tonight’s Skies
  • The Moon
  • Mythology and the Stars

Plan your visit to the Lyman Spitzer Jr. Planetarium


Our staff meteorologists, the voices of the Eye on the Sky weather broadcasts, are also our weather educators.
What better source could there be for learning about the science behind weather and climate!

Introduction to Weather Instruments

What kinds of tools does a weatherperson use to measure what’s going on in the air? How do they work? Thermometers (liquid and bimetallic), anemometer, wind vane, barometer, psychrometer and rain gauge are explained and passed around for close inspection. A brief trip to the Weather Center and the Instrument Shelter closes the time.
Duration: 50 minutes, flexible for K (can include Weather Center/Instrument Shelter).
Suitable for grades K-3


Weather Center and Instrument Shelter

The title says it all! A guided view of the Northern New England Weather Center, including instruments and telecommunications equipment; then a quick trip to the Instrument Shelter for an explanation of its workings.


 

Weatherlore

Before computers, The Weather Channel, even the Old Farmer’s Almanac, forecasting the weather was a do-it-yourself project. And so, through hundreds of years of observing the weather, reliable signs were compiled and passed on, becoming those quaint country quips like when the cows lay down at midday, rain in on the way. Yet most, if not all of these bits of weather wisdom work. A look at the sayings, the science behind them, and a way for you to use them to forecast your own weather.
Appropriate for all ages.


 

How Do We Make a Forecast?

A day in the Life of a Meteorologist
An explanation of the process of making a weather forecast. We cover everything from taking local observations; through mapping regional, national, or hemispheric observations and using satellite imagery; to using computer model output. By the end your students should have a good understanding of how a meteorologist organizes his or her thoughts when faced with the task of figuring out the weather from 2 hours to 2 weeks into the future.
Best for Grade 4 & up.


Weather a la Carte!

  • Wind
  • Pressure
  • Temperature
  • Moisture

These lessons could be presented one of two ways:

  • A short lesson focusing on one of four topics, with a “hands on” activity to follow, or,
  • A longer lesson focusing on one of four topics, with follow up materials provided for your class to conduct “hands-on” experiments back at school.

Suitable for students from Kindergarten to the third grade.

Plan your Weather Program visit.

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