Interactive Living History

Interactive Living History

The Paul Revere House.jpg
19 North Square, Boston, MA, United States

On the night of April 18, 1775, silversmith Paul Revere left his small wooden home in Boston’s North End and set out on a journey that would make him into a legend. Today that home is still standing at 19 North Square and has become a national historic landmark. It is downtown Boston’s oldest building and one of the few remaining from an early era in the history of colonial America.

The home was built about 1680 on the site of the former parsonage of the Second Church of Boston. Increase Mather, the Minister of the Second Church, and his family (including his son, Cotton Mather) occupied this parsonage from 1670 until it was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1676. A large and fashionable new home was built at the same location about four years later.

Paul Revere owned the home from 1770 to 1800, although he and his family may not have lived here in some periods in the 1780s and 90s. After Revere sold the home in 1800, it soon became a tenement, and the ground floor was remodeled for use as shops, including at various times a candy store, cigar factory, bank and vegetable and fruit business. In 1902, Paul Revere’s great-grandson, John P. Reynolds Jr. purchased the building to ensure that it would not be demolished. Over the next few years, money was raised, and the Paul Revere Memorial Association formed to preserve and renovate the building. In April 1908, the Paul Revere House opened its doors to the public as one of the earliest historic house museums in the U.S. The Association still oversees the preservation and day-to-day operations of this national treasure.

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Paul Revere House for Summer Camp & Scout Groups

The Paul Revere House offers interactive educational programs designed to acquaint your campers with Boston’s long and colorful history. Built in the 1680s for a wealthy merchant, the house became home to silversmith and famous midnight rider Paul Revere during the Revolutionary era. In the 19th century, landlords divided the structure into cramped apartments for immigrant families. Containing remnants of many periods,the house provides a perfect setting in which to explore everyday life from colonial times to the early 20th century.

Reservations

Reservations must be made at least two weeks in advance.

We accept reservation requests by phone(617-523-2338) or by fax. Before contacting the Education Department please fill out a Reservation Request Form (available to download below) to assist you in the planning process. We do not accept reservation requests by email. If you are planning to make a booking for April, May, or June, we encourage you to contact us several months in advance as these are popular times for field trips to the museum. 

Please remember that you do not have a reservation until we have confirmed the arrangements with you by telephone and you have received a written confirmation.

To request a reservation for a Paul Revere House site visit
or program, please use our Reservation Request Form

Summer Camp & Scout Group Trip Programs

Site Visit

For groups walking the Freedom Trail or on a whirlwind tour of Boston,this is the perfect option. Outside the Revere House, a member of the museum staff tells the story of Revere’s ride and presents a brief history of his home. Inside the building, museum staff provide a fascinating glimpse into everyday life for the Revere family, describing the intriguing furnishings and personal artifacts on display. Plenty of time is available for questions. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 30 – 45 minutes
  • Grades: 1st – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 40 people at a time.
  • Larger groups may reserve consecutive times (30 minutes apart).
  • Fee: 75 cents per child 5-17, $2.50 per college student or senior over 62, $3.00 per adult

The Man Behind the Myth

During a short slide presentation, children find out what really happened on Revere’s midnight ride. In small groups, students examine letters, advertisements and reproduction artifacts, looking for clues about the man behind the myth. Intriguing details emerge about Revere’s personality, contributions to the Revolution, large family and many business ventures. An interactive tour of Revere’s house completes the program. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 4th – 7th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130

Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride: Storytelling Program

Find out what really happened during Paul Revere’s midnight ride. Watch a short slide show which separates the facts from the myths surrounding the ride, then retrace Revere’s route from his home in North Square towards the Charles River. Children don hats and carry props as they go,taking on the roles of Paul and Rachel Revere, their children, British soldiers, rowers, Samuel Adams, John Hancock and many others. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 1st – 3rd
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

Walking Tour: Paul Revere’s Boston

Explore the neighborhood where Paul Revere lived and worked. This tour includes stops at the locations of Revere’s silversmith shop and foundry, Boston’swaterfront, Copp’s Hill Cemetery and outside the Old North Church. As they explore the North End, students gather details about Revere’s life by inspecting prints and reproduction artifacts, and discover how Revere used Boston’s geography to his advantage. Price includes a tour of the Revere House and pre-visit materials.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 20 students per tour. Two tours may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130

The Revere Children and the Siege of Boston

After his midnight ride, Paul Revere couldn’t return to Boston. Whatbecame of his family as patriot forces besieged the city, trying toexpel the British troops? Children find out as they take on the roles ofSarah, helping her mother pack to flee the city, and Paul Jr., leftbehind to guard the house against marauding soldiers. Pre-visitmaterials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 6th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

Boston’s North End: The Immigrant Experience

Paul Revere’s North End changed dramatically in the 1800s as Irish,Eastern European and Italian immigrants settled in the colonialdwellings in enormous numbers. At the City of Boston Archaeology Lab,students examine 19th-century personal care items, toys and kitchenutensils excavated at the Revere House. Each artifact providesfascinating clues about the families who lived and worked in the RevereHouse when it was a boarding house.

On a walking tour through the NorthEnd’s twisting streets and alleyways students hear accounts of childrenwho grew up in the nearby tenements, discovering how they helped supporttheir families by working as “newsies,” trooped to the local bath housewith little brothers or sisters in tow, played stickball, and helpedtend rooftop gardens. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: 3rd – 12th
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students per tour.
  • Two tours may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130

Fun and Games in the 1700s

Introduce young children to life in colonial Boston through games popular in the Reveres’ era. Inside the Revere House, students search for beans, thimbles, a bed wrench and other household items colonial families incorporated into pastimes. Students then try their hands at games such as Snail, Button-Button, Jackstraws, Beast-Fish-Fowl, and Ninepins. Fascinating details emerge about many aspects of daily life. Pre-visit materials provided.

  • Time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Grades: PreK-1st
  • Class Size: Up to 22 students.
  • Two programs may be scheduled concurrently.
  • Fee: $130
  • One-hour version available for classroom presentation. Fee: $175. (Outreach Program)

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Howell Living History Farm.jpg
101 Hunter Road, Titusville, Hopewell Township, NJ, United States

Howell Living History Farm is a time machine that takes you back to the year 1900 – a time when horses and buggies traveled the lanes of Pleasant Valley, and when farms were bordered by snake fences and Osage orange trees.

You were a farmer, then…the kind that could drive a team of horses and plow a furrow with a walking plow. You could build a barn, or deliver a lamb, or bake a loaf of bread from wheat that you grew yourself. And you may have been remembered for the time you canned 200 quarts of tomatoes in a day, or the May Day you went to town in a one-horse sleigh.

Today, if it is time to harvest corn, you can ride up into a field in a horse drawn wagon, help us shock and pick corn, and return to the barnyard to help shell it, grind it, and bake it into cornbread. We invite you to help us plant, cultivate and harvest our crops, to care for our animals, to sweep our barn, to make soap, butter and ice cream, and of course to sit under the maple tree and talk about the future. (The future looks good, by the way. There are rumors of “combines”, horseless buggies and automatic ice cream makers.)

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Summer Camp & Scout Group Programs

Program Fees

All programs except for “Farm Animals” and “Summer on the Farm” are $75.00 for in-county visitors and $100.00 for out-of-county visitors for each group of 25 people or less. (This includes adult chaperones as well).

Farm Animals is $4.00 per person (in-county); and $5.00 per person (out-of-county) .

The Summer on the Farm program is $100.00 for in-county and $125.00 for out-of-county.

Farm Programs:

Ice Harvesting: Work with farmers on the frozen pond, where volunteers from your group will help to score, cut and float ice. Everyone will help when it is time to pull the ice blocks up a wooden track to the icehouse. Blocks are lowered into the icehouse via a chute, and then packed in layers of sawdust. (If there is no ice on the pond, your group will work with commercial ice just as farmers did in 1900 if winters were mild.)

Tree Tapping and Sap Gathering: Learn how to identify a sugar maple tree. Volunteers from your group will help us tap a sugar maple tree. All will taste the sap if it is flowing before beginning the work of collecting it from the many trees in our “sugarbush”. You will load some of the sap on a horse or oxen drawn wagon to take back to the farm for syrup making.

Sheep Care: Learn about the care of our sheep as you pet the lambs, help brush the ewes, and visit the flock in the sheep yard. Help process wool using our hand cranked carding machine to prepare it for spinning. Learn about the many uses for wool products on a 1900 family farm.

FARM ANIMALS PROGRAM: Station Activities

Corn Planting: Learn about corn planting technology by using hand sowing methods used throughout history…and by planting corn using a circa 1900, animal-drawn seeder. Discover why seeders like this one – and why tractor-drawn seeders- are still “future” technology for most of the world’s farmers

Wagon Tour of Farming Operations: Old-fashioned horsepower will pull your wagon into a landscape reminiscent of the Hopewell Township of a century ago, when farm lanes were bordered by snake fences and osage orange trees, and when farmers still worked by hand and horsepower to cultivate their fields of corn, oats, wheat and hay. Operations vary daily, so there is no telling what you might see: a reaper-binder or haytedder in action, a flock of sheep coming in from the meadow, or a farm crew bringing in the sheaves.

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JFK Library and Museum Boston.jpg
Columbia Point, Boston, MA 02125, United States

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum is dedicated to the memory of our nation’s thirty-fifth president and to all those who through the art of politics seek a new and better world. Located on a ten-acre park, overlooking the sea that he loved and the city that launched him to greatness, the Library stands as a vibrant tribute to the life and times of John F. Kennedy.

Come tour our Museum which portrays the life, leadership, and legacy of President Kennedy, conveys his enthusiasm for politics and public service, and illustrates the nature of the office of the President.

Students and scholars can also arrange to conduct research using our collection of historical materials chronicling mid-20th century politics and the life and administration of John F. Kennedy.

Experience our Museum through our three theaters, period settings, and 25 dramatic multimedia exhibits, and enter the recreated world of the Kennedy Presidency for a “first-hand” experience of John F. Kennedy’s life, legacy, and leadership.

Shop in our Museum Store or dine in the JFK Café. Walk along the Harborwalk or picnic on our beautiful grounds at the Harbor’s edge. From May to October, President Kennedy’s 26′ sailboat Victura is on display on our grounds.

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Group Visits

Experience the life and legacy of President John F. Kennedy by taking a self-guided tour of the 25 Multimedia exhibits in our Museum.

Visit the Museum as part of a group of 12 or more and receive a discount on admission with reservations made at least two weeks in advance.

To Make a Reservation

To reserve a group visit, please contact our Group Visits Department using the information listed below or use our online Group Reservation Request Form.

Contact Information

For group reservations, please contact our Group Visits Department.

Phone: 617.514.1589 or 1.866.JFK.1960 x41589

Fax: 617.514.1593

Group Admission Rates with advanced reservations

Adults $10.00

Seniors and College Students $10.00

Youth (13-17) $9.00

Children (age 12 and under) Free

Duration

We suggest that you allow a minimum of 90 minutes to get the most from your Museum experience.

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Interactive Exhibits 

Clouds Over Cuba

Clouds over Cuba

Explore the Cuban Missile Crisis from various perspectives. This interactive exhibit sets the context of the early 1960s, and gives you the opportunity to explore What If? scenarios.

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President's Desk

The Presidents Desk

Sit at President Kennedy’s Oval Office Desk and discover what it means to hold the highest office in the land.

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World on the Brink: JFK and the Cuban Missile Crisis

World on a Brink

For 13 days in October 1962, a confrontation between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. brought the world to the abyss of nuclear destruction and the end of mankind. Read formerly classified documents and listen in on secretly recorded ExComm meetings as President Kennedy and his advisors seek a peaceful resolution for the removal of Soviet intercontinental missiles from Cuba.

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Integrating Ole Miss

Integrating Ole Miss

In the fall of 1962 the college town of Oxford, Mississippi, erupted in violence. James Meredith, an African American, attempted to register at the all-white University of Mississippi, known as “Ole Miss.” This site lets visitors witness the events firsthand through the actual letters, recorded telephone conversations, and images of those who made history.

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White House Diary

White House Diary

Travel back in time to the early 1960′s and experience first- hand each of President Kennedy’s thousand days in office through the interactive White House Diary – a daily schedule of President John F. Kennedy that includes digital scans of his actual appointment diary for any given day as well as video, audio, and photos of the day’s events.

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Virtual Tour of the JFK Library Museum

Virtual Museum Tour

This online tour includes selected highlights of the museum’s introductory film and allows you to virtually explore selected exhibits and learn more about key items in the Museum collection.

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We Choose the Moon

We Chose Moon

Each stage of this interactive online exhibit allows visitors to follow the historic moon landing minute by minute and explore archival photos and footage of President Kennedy’s pioneering space efforts. More than 1.3 million individuals logged on to launch of this international award-winning website during the July 2009 40-year anniversary of the five-day journey to the moon.

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Permanent Exhibits 

Leadership for the 60's Campaign Button

Campaign Trail

After narrowly losing the vice presidential nomination in 1956, Senator John F. Kennedy sought the presidency in 1960. After hard-fought primary victories, JFK won his party’s nomination and faced-off against sitting Vice President Richard Nixon in a campaign that featured the first live-broadcast television debates between presidential candidates. After his election as the 35th president of the United States, JFK set out to redeem his campaign pledge to “get America moving again.”

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Radio and Television

The Briefing Room 

John F. Kennedy was the first president to effectively use the new medium of television to speak directly to the American people through live televised press conferences. Video samples of his responses to reporters’ questions and exhibits of objects and documents illustrate the wide range of issues he confronted as President.  Also included is his speech to the people of West Berlin denouncing the construction of the Berlin Wall.

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Launch of the Mercury MR-3 Space Capsule Freedom 7

The Space Race 

In 1961 responding to the Soviet Union’s lead in the exploration of space, President Kennedy challenged the United States to keep up in the “Space Race” and not fall behind the Soviets.  He said: “We have a long way to go in the space race. We started late. But this is the new ocean, and I believe the United States must sail on it and be in a position second to none”.  Kennedy set the goal of landing an American on the Moon before the end of the decade and initiated the programs to make it possible.

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Robert F. Kennedy's US Treasury Badge

Attorney General Office

President Kennedy appointed his 35-year old brother Robert Francis Kennedy as the attorney general of the United States. The close working relationship of John and Robert Kennedy was one of the most unusual and successful in the history of American public life. When Robert Kennedy became attorney general, the civil rights struggle was entering a new phase of activism which precipitated the Justice Department involvement in protecting and upholding the rights of many African Americans.

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Carolina Rocking Chair

Oval Office 

The Oval Office has been the President’s office since 1909.  The preference for an oval room dates back to George Washington, who greeted his guests standing in a circle around him, equally distant from the President.  The circle became a symbol of democracy.  President Kennedy personalized his Oval Office with his collections of ship models and scrimshaw, reflective of his lifelong affection for the sea and sailing.  In this setting visitors view a video covering the struggle against racial segregation in 1963.

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Watercolor Painting of the White House Treaty Room

First Lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy

After becoming first lady at the age of thirty-one, Jacqueline Kennedy embarked on extensive historic restoration of the White House interiors, in which she sought to make the White House a museum of the presidency. Mrs. Kennedy also used the prestige of her position to champion American arts and culture, often inviting prominent actors, artists, writers, poets, and musicians to participate and perform at White House events. Her simple-yet-elegant sophistication and interest in other cultures made her well-known and beloved around the world.

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Kennedy Commemorative Cup

Kennedy Family

John F. Kennedy was the offspring of two families, the Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, whose roots stretched back to Ireland. They immigrated to Boston in the 1840′s seeking greater economic opportunity, religious and political liberty in America. The Irish in particular readily adapted to the American political system. By the end of the nineteenth century the President’s two grandfathers had become successful Boston politicians, establishing the Kennedy tradition of political involvement.

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Chicago History Museum.jpg
1601 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60614, United States

Chicago History Museum

The Chicago History Museum stands at the crossroads of America’s past and its future. If you live in Chicago or visit here and are curious about the city’s past, present, and future, the Museum should be your first stop.

Your History Lives Here

The Chicago History Museum cares for, showcases, and interprets millions of authentic pieces of Chicago and U.S. history. Our ability to illuminate the past is a reminder of what really happened once upon a time, sheds light on the present, and compellingly informs the future.

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We invite you to engage with our stories and make history yourself.

Group Field Trips: Chicago History Museum

The Chicago History Museum proudly presents fun-filled, content-rich experiences for students from pre-K to grade 12. Our free field trips align with state and national learning standards.

Book a field trip to visit our original exhibitions. Utilize an audio tour written and performed by local teenagers. Prepare for or follow up on your visit with Great Chicago Stories and our other online resources.

We look forward to welcoming you to the Chicago History Museum.

Your Field Trip Experience

What will my students do? What will my students see?

There’s a lot to do, see, and learn at the Chicago History Museum!

During field trips, teachers and chaperones lead their groups on self-guided experiences through the Museum’s exhibitions. We encourage groups to explore our galleries at their own pace and stop at student-friendly activities along the way.

See it. Hear it.  Walk it. Ride it.

Whatever method suites your group best, We have great tours that will bring you closer to Chicago and its fascinating stories.

Tours are available for groups of adults ages 18 and up.

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Engaging Exhibitions for Youth Groups 

crossroads
Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Exelon Wing

Exhibition: Chicago: Crossroads of America

Explore Chicago’s changing economy, challenging crises, diverse neighborhoods, groundbreaking innovations, and lively cultural scene in six galleries.


Learn more about this exhibition

Location: KPMG and Paul and Katherine Snyder Community Gallery

Exhibition: Vivian Maiers Chicago

Through summer 2013

Come witness the life work of a nanny turned photographer that wowed the world with breathtaking images of everyday life in Urban America. Discover Chicago faces and neighborhoods of the 1950s and 1960s from an entirely new vantage point.


Slideshow

View a selection of Vivian Maier’s photographs on Flickr

Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Skyline Gallery

Exhibition: Magic

Through January 6, 2013

Discover Chicago’s place in American magic. Settle down in the object theater and meet Greta, a little girl who visits a wonderful store hoping to learn a magician’s secrets. Next door, explore a collection of magical artifacts and activities for young magicians that will inspired amazement and delight.


sensing chicago kids
Sensing Chicago

Located in: Konen Family Children’s Gallery

Exhibition: Sensing Chicago

  • Ride a high-wheel bicycle.
  • Hear the Great Chicago Fire.
  • Catch a fly ball at Old Comiskey Park.
  • Smell the city’s past.
  • Be a Chicago-style hot dog.

Did you know that history is beautiful, noisy, rough, stinky, and delicious? In this gallery, students can use their five senses to:

Recommended for grades 3 and 4. Due to the popularity of this gallery, special reservations for a 30 minute time slot are required. Please indicate your interest on the field trip reservation form.


diorama
Imaging Chicago: The Diorama

Location: Taiwani Foundation Diorama Hall

Exhibition: Imagining Chicago: The Diorama

Visit our beloved dioramas to experience the first 100 years of Chicago’s history. Hands-on activities challenge students to look closely at the scenes, find specific details, and put history into a larger context.


abe
Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Sanger P. Robinson Gallery 

Exhibition: Lincoln’s Chicago 

Catch a glimpse of the city Lincoln knew through portraits of his contemporaries and lithographic view of 1860s Chicago.


Abraham Lincoln

This exhibition highlights Lincoln’s election in 1860, his leadership during the Civil War, and his tragic assassination in a series of dramatic windows and audio narration.


Learn more about this exhibition

Location: Kovler Family Lobby

Exhibition: Unexpected Chicago

Through January 6, 2013

What’s the most surprising thing about a collection made up of millions of artifacts? A single artifact! This world-class collection holds the second largest costume collection in the world including clothing and accessories as well as thousands of linear feet of archives and manuscripts that make up the equivalent of forty-nine football fields or twelve Willis Towers. Unexpected Chicago is a way to reveal unexpected treasures of Chicago history a single artifact at a time.


Learn more about this exhibition

Located in: Benjamin Green-Field Gallery

Exhibition: Shalom Chicago

Opens October 21st. 2012

Explore the Jewish community’s rich history and contributions to the city’s growth and development, through personal stories, rare artifacts, and engaging multimedia presentations.


entrance

Exhibition: Treasures

This series of installations promotes exploration throughout the Museum!

  • Imagine riding low and slow in our custom-made, tricked-out 1978 Chevrolet Monte Carlo.
  • Learn about Abraham Lincoln and see his deathbed.
  • Play Street Smarts, a game that challenges students to match events with the intersections where they took place.

Location: Skyline Gallery, Bessie Green-Field Warshawsky Gallery, and Mazza Foundation Gallery

Exhibition: Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair

Opens March 16, 2013

Relive the experience of the Ebony Fashion Fair in this one-of-a-kind exhibition. Explore its fifty-year history, and discover how Eunice Johnson overcame adversity to bring high couture fashion to African American communities, while raising millions of dollars for charities along the way. More than sixty garments, including works by Oscar de la Renta, Christian Dior, Stephen Burrows, Yves Saint Laurent, and Patrick Kelly, help tell the story of this world-renowned fashion show and its redefinition of American beauty.

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New Hampshire Farmers Museum.jpg
1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton, NH, United States

The New Hampshire Farm Museum is a non-profit 501 c3 educational organization dedicated to preserving, promoting and carrying forward New Hampshire’s rural and agricultural heritage. The New Hampshire Farm Museum consists of two adjoining farmsteads situated on 50 acres located on Plummer’s Ridge in Milton, New Hampshire. The historic Jones Farm and the Plummer Homestead are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and were passed down in the same families for two centuries. The Museum operates a working farm growing heirloom varieties of vegetables for our Community Supported Agriculture Program and for sale in our Country store. We raise hens for eggs and keep a small selection of heritage breed farm animals to support our educational efforts. We have displays of agricultural implements and educational exhibits on rural life and agriculture for the visiting public and our many visiting school children. We offer guided tours of the historic Jones farmhouse as well as farm animal tours. Special events and programs, workshops, and day camps are offered throughout the year.

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Planning Your Group Visit

School, homeschools, scouting or camp groups are all welcome at the New Hampshire Farm Museum We need a minimum of 10 children or $60. to run a program. The museum accepts school and youth group visits from May 1st through December. Visits can be scheduled Tuesday through Friday 9:00 am to 4:00 pm depending on the program.

To Schedule Your Visit : Please call 603-652-7840 or email: info@farmmuseum.org.

We recommend one chaperon per ten students. Chaperons or home school parents are charged at half the student rate. There is no charge for teachers, group leaders, counselors or bus drivers or children ages 3 and under. In good weather students can pack a lunch to eat in our picnic area. We have an outdoor handicapped accessible restroom/port-a-potty. We can show students historic games like hoop rolling and graces for all to play with during lunch. We welcome students to shop in our Country Store if permitted during lunch break. The store contains many inexpensive items, educational toys, juice and soda, penny candy and farm grown produce and eggs.

School and Youth Programs at the NH Farm Museum

The New Hampshire Farm Museum provides a wonderful, hands-on opportunity for your students to explore New Hampshire’s agricultural heritage and see where farming and technology intersect with New Hampshire history.  Students who visit the museum have the opportunity to tour a working organic farm and learn about agricultural practices such as the “three sisters”, a method of co-planting corn, beans, and squash that the European settlers learned from the Native Americans. In addition to being a working farm, the museum is home to a vast collection of historic agricultural implements and artifacts of rural life including Daniel Webster’s plow and Horace Greeley’s privy and two historic farmhouses. No visit is complete without a chance to interact with the heritage breed farm animals!

Any of the following educational programs offered by the museum can be easily adapted to fit your curriculum and meet your class’s specific needs.

The Ox-Cart Man: Farms & Families at Work 

Program recommended for grades k-3. Offered May-mid-November. Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum, Approx. 3 hours

In this hands-on program based on NH poet Donald Hall’s story, The Ox-Cart Man, children explore the way families lived and worked in the past throughout rural New England. The students tour the 18th-century farmhouse cape and learn about the roles of each member of the household and how each was needed to make the family’s living. In gathering farm products to bring to market, they learn about the artifacts and objects of daily life in Colonial times. On their hunt through the barn they search for many of the farm objects depicted in the story and learn about barter and trade. Students make butter, meet our sheep, chickens, turkeys and pig, work with wool, try a planting or harvesting activity and help pack the ox-cart for the trip to Portsmouth.

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: Rural Life & Technological/Agricultural Evolution 

Program recommended for students grades 3-8. Offered May-mid-November Cost $6 per child. 10 student minimum-60 maximum. Approx. 3 hours

The Jones Farmstead consists of a set of connected farm buildings referred to in an old children’s rhyme as, “Big House, little house, back house, barn.” Each piece of this connected farm structure tells a different story about New Hampshire history from Colonial times to the Twentieth century. In this hands-on program students learn about rural life and technological and agricultural change in New England as they tour the historic farmhouse, hunt for artifacts in the barn, and participate in farm chores. Students will view “Hands to Work,” a short film which uses oral histories and historic photographs of New Hampshire farming. They will try farm chores like grinding corn, carrying water with a yoke, and doing the wash. They will visit the farm animals and make butter. This program can be used supplement lessons on the transition from farms to factories as part of economic evolution or adapted to fit a range of other learning goals.

Hands to Work Program for Pre-schoolers

Program recommended for children ages 3-5 yrs. Offered May through mid-November. Cost: $5 per child. 10 student minimum- maximum: 25. Approx. 2 hours.

Children will learn all about the work on the farm and how the children helped in this completely hands-on program for pre-schoolers. They will grind the corn to feed the chickens, do the wash with washtub and wringer, pump the water at the well, feel the wool from the sheep, churn the cream to make butter, plant a seed or harvest the vegetables depending on the season and explore the Big Yellow Barn to hunt for fun things related to the farm.

An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving on the Farm 

Program recommended for children grades K – 5. Offered November 1st through November 20th. Cost: $7 per child 10 student minimum- maximum 45. Approx. 2 ½ hours.

New Hampshire has a special connection to Thanksgiving as it was our own Sarah Josepha Hale who persuaded President Lincoln in 1863 to declare it a National Holiday. Students will enjoy a tour through the historic farmhouse with costumed roleplayers portraying the Civil War Era. Then they will learn to grind and pound flint corn to make our cornbread and to churn cream into butter for our bread and press apples to make cider for us to drink. We will also explore the 104 ft. long great barn on a special barn hunt and visit with our heritage breed turkeys and other farm animals.

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Wickham Fruit Farm.jpg
28700 Route 25, Cutchogue, NY, United States

Wickham’s Fruit Farm is located on 28700 Route 25 in Cutchogue, Long Island, about 90 miles east of New York City. Wickham’s fruit is grown on some of the oldest continually cultivated land in the country, much of the farm dating from 1661. Wickham’s Fruit Farm is an historic, bicentennial farm, beautiful to behold against the sparkling waters of Peconic Bay.

It is one of the largest farms on the North Fork, approximately 300 acres, of which 200 acres are in fruit, all of which is retailed at the farm. The emphasis is on fruit of the highest quality, and all fruit sold is guaranteed.

A very large proportion of Wickham farm land has been placed in Suffolk County’s Farmland Preservation program, which means that for generations to come, this land is “forever agriculture.” 
Wickham’s Fruit Farm is a family enterprise which has taken pride in producing and marketing the choicest of fruit. The retail market is open usually from May through December from Monday through Saturday. 

Wickham’s is closed on Sundays, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas.
Schools and private groups who book a tour in advance can schedule a tour of the farm to pick fruit in season, enjoy the scenic beauty of a farm on the water, observe a live working beehive, and when possible, observe our old historic cider press. 

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Summer Camp and Scout Trips

 

Farm Tours on the Wickham Farm

Enjoy the rural scenery and ambience of a historic, bicentennial farm that is situated right on beautiful Peconic Bay. Participants climb aboard our old fashioned  wagons for a ride around our farm. Along the way visitors see orchards, row crops, hot-houses, barns, and real old machinery!

Bee Hive Observation

Ever wonder what occurs inside a hive? Everyone is fascinated by the world of the honeybee. You can observe a real, working beehive at our Bee Observation Station.

NOTE: Beehive observation is over by late Fall, depending on weather conditions.

 Picnic Area

Field Trip groups and visitors are welcome to use our picnic area which is nestled among some of our farm’s oldest fruit trees. Visitors enjoy lunches in a beautiful rustic setting. (Bring your own lunch & drink.) There is no charge for using picnic area in conjunction with a tour.

Pick Your own Apples (When in Season)

Enjoy the hands-on experience of picking apples off the trees, and enjoy the healthy countryside beauty of our vast orchards. Snap off your very own ripe apples! (You might  meet a box turtle along the way!)

Pick your Pumpkins (When in Season)

Tip-Toe gently in the pumpkin patch. Pick a tiny pumpkin, a medium-sized pumpkin, or a Cinderella pumpkin! And squashes, cheese pumpkins and many, many more! Wickham’s has the largest, gigantic pumpkins on the North fork!

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Essex Steam Train and River Boat 1.jpg
Railroad Avenue, Essex, CT 06426, United States

Essex Steam Train & Riverboat’s 2½-hour journey begins at the historic 1892 Essex Station for a 12-mile, narrated round-trip into the heart of the unspoiled Connecticut River Valley – designated “one of the last great places on earth” by the Nature Conservancy.

The steam locomotive pulls vintage coaches at 20 mph through the quintessential New England towns of Deep River and Chester. The picturesque countryside includes pristine meadows, a quaint farm, a millpond with waterfall, and trestles and bridges over rivers and creeks. A natural highlight is the undeveloped Selden Neck State Park, accessible only by boat.

Essex Steam Train offers unique access to several coves and preserves, immersing passengers in an on-board eco-excursion. The train travels near the tidal wetlands of Pratt Cove and Chester Creek – – bountiful, natural habitats for birds. Among those typically spotted are Cormorants, Ducks, Swans, Greenland Geese, Blue Heron, Egrets, and Red-winged Blackbirds. In February and March, the majestic Bald Eagle is the star of the show, when it migrates south to the Connecticut River Valley from Canada and Maine.

At Deep River Landing, passengers are escorted onto the Becky Thatcher riverboat for a 1¼- hour cruise along the Connecticut River. The visual serenity of the river valley is on full display from Becky’s multiple decks. The deep water, coves, inlets, marshes, wildlife, and rocky shoreline are all at once, simply breathtaking! Just as impressive are the historic sights including Gillette Castle, Goodspeed Opera House, and the Haddam Swing Bridge. Upon Becky’s return to Deep River Landing, the steam train welcomes passengers for the return trip back to Essex Station.

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Group Field Trips
Take your group back to the glory days of steam! They’ll enjoy the comfort of our restored vintage rail cars and get an unobstructed view of the unspoiled beauty of the Connecticut River Valley from our multi-deck riverboat. It’s a wonderful trip any time of year.We offer special rates for groups of 20 or more with advance reservations – contact our Groups Ticket Sales. We also can arrange for special private charters on our steam train and/or riverboat. Pleasecontact our office for more information. Group Sales in Office
Box Lunches
Trackside Café Groups can arrange for box lunches from ourTrackside Café. Your group can enjoy:

  • Sandwich (Choice of Ham, Turkey, Roast Beef)
  • Potato Chips and Cookie
  • Choice of Bottled Soda, Water, or Juice

All lunches must be consumed at the Essex Depot picnic area or on the boat – there is no eating or drinking allowed on the train.

Box Lunches must be ordered at least 5 business days before the date of your visit. Please give us a call for pricing and with any questions!

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Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum.jpg
18 Highlawn Road, Warner, NH, United States

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum, Education and Cultural Center, is dedicated to connecting people of today with 20,000 years of ongoing Native American cultural expression. The Museum embraces cultural diversity and encourages responsible environmental action based on respect for nature. Through exhibitions and programs, the Museum seeks to challenge and inspire all of us to improve the quality of our lives and our world.

Voted by NH Magazine as the Best Cultural Center of 2012, Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum is a great place to bring the entire family. Fun educational tours, beautiful grounds, the Village of Warner and Rollins State Park are all reasons to visit. Children will appreciate the scenic sets, animated characters, and realistic costumes to be discovered at Mt. Kearsarge!

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum brings you on a memorable journey encompassing the amazing diversity of North American Indian cultures and reverence for nature. Discover the past by examining artifacts left behind in various ancient Indian territories. Combination tours also include a guided walk through the Medicine Woods Nature Trail featuring 100 plants native to our area, that were used by Native peoples for tools, medicines, shelter, and more!

Don’t forget to make a pit stop at The Dream Catcher Gift Shop to purchase a souvenir on your way out!

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glowing turtle icon Educational Tours
Over the course of 20 years, MKIM has offered educational group tours to over 105,000 children. Education is the core of our mission and we look forward to welcoming your group on a memorable journey encompassing the amazing diversity of North American Indian cultures and reverence for nature. In addition to school tours, MKIM offers tours for homeschoolers, scout tours, senior tours, and special interest tours for groups such as cultural awareness, gardening, craft, Native studies, and museum studies groups.Groups begin their visit by viewing a 10-minute DVD that orients them to the museum. Museum Educators introduce themselves and lay out the framework and rules for the tour. Then the journey begins!Enter the Northeastern Woodlands with its birch bark containers, moose hair embroidery and split ash baskets, into the Southeast with artifacts from the Seminole and Cherokee cultures. Around a corner, enter the Southwest with a fascinating discussion about corn, pueblo pottery, Navajo weaving and basketry from the western part of the country.Next, step into the Plains Galleries.  This work, completed under the direction of Chris Bullock, Wampanoag, brings a full-scale furnished tipi into the galleries! Children and adults alike will marvel at this glimpse into Plains life with discussions of the American bison, beadwork and feather headdresses. The Northwest Coast is represented by artifacts such as harpoon heads, fur lined moccasins, model kayaks and more recent stone sculptures.Finally, our Ceremonial Room focuses on the pipes, the musical instruments and the regalia that have been used in ceremonies of all kinds by Native Americans. Connect the Circle Tours also include a guided walk through of the Medicine Woods Nature Trail, where we have over 100 plants native to our area that have been used by Native peoples for tools, medicines, foods, dyes, transportation, shelter, and more. Click here to download a Group Reservation Form. 

MKIM is a natural resource for classroom teachers, home schoolparents, youth group leaders and enrichment coordinators. In addition to offering group tours of the museum the museum offers Educator Resource Kits, Outreach Programs and specifics on how MKIM aligns with the New Hampshire Department of Education’s State Curriculum Frameworks for Teaching Social Studies.

Plains-style tipi.  Photo by Richard Senor. 2008.

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Group tours

Guided tours of the Museum for groups of 10 or more are available by reservation only. Reservations can be made up to a year in advance. Please call (603) 456-2600 or download and mail in the Group Reservation Form to secure your spot today!

MUSEUM GROUP TOUR PRICES
Students 12 and Under $5.50
Students 17 and Under $6.50
Adults 18 and Over $7.50
Seniors 65 and Over $6.50
MUSEUM AND MEDICINE WOODS
TOUR PRICES
Students 12 and Under $10.50
Students 17 and Under $12.50
      Adult Chaperones $5.00
      Teacher Aides Free
Adults 18 and Over $14.50
Seniors 65 and Over $12.50
Plimoth Plantation.jpg
137 Warren Avenue, Plymouth, MA, United States

Groups Field Trips at Plimoth Plantation offer a fascinating and personal look at the lives of the Native Wampanoag People and the Pilgrims, the English who lived in early Plymouth Colony. In addition to a self-guided Museum tour, School groups have a number of options for tailoring their visit. Summer camp or Scout Groups with a specific interest, such as early gardens, period cookery, colonial religion, Native culture, timber-frame construction, or navigation, may book a speaker through our Professional Speakers Bureau or a Guided Tour.

Our historical theme dining turns what might otherwise be just another restaurant meal into a memorable (and tasty!) addition to your visit for your Field Trips. We offer themed meals with Pilgrim and or Native hosts, and lunch or dinner with food historians who will teach your Camp or Scout groups just how Miles Standish ate his dinner without a fork. For more about historical or modern-day dining opportunities, go to our Groups Dining page.

Groups also have a variety of choices to expand their stay, including Wampanoag field trip enhancements, hands-on workshops, historical dining programs and overnight programs. We would be happy to combine any of these to create a package suitable to your needs. For more about our student school groups programs, go to our Education Programs section.

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Summer Camp Groups Field Trips

Plimoth Plantation school field trip

Let Plimoth Plantation help you expand the walls of your classroom and inspire in your students a curiosity about and understanding of the past. Whether you bring your students to the museum or have us come to you, we will spark your students’ imaginations and make history come alive.

There’s a reason why Plimoth Plantation is one of the most popular field trip destinations in New England!  At Mayflower II, The 17th-Century English Village, and the Wampanoag Homesite, students are surrounded by the sights, smells and sounds of the 17th century. Visits to the Museum are a great way to spark the imagination of your students and help to make history come alive!

There are a variety of ways you can use our unique living history resources.

Plimoth Plantation Field Trips

Visits to the Museum immerse your students in the 17th-century world of the Wampanoag and Pilgrims. For more information on booking a field trip, visit our reservations page. Information on grant funding for field trips may be found at Foundations for Kids.  

Special Programs 

While you’re at the Museum, why not arrange for a special hands-on workshopguided tour or special meal? You can even plan an overnight stay

We Can Visit You

Can’t make it to the Museum? We’ll bring the Museum to you! Our Pilgrims and Native museum teachers will go from class to class, for informative and fun hour-long classroom programs or traveling workshops.

Invite Plimoth Plantation to your camp or group meeting.

Our talented Pilgrim role players and Native museum teachers can bring the magic of Plimoth Plantation to your classroom; wherever you are. Their visits are a great way to prepare for a field trip and are a wonderful option for those who can’t make it to the museum.

For more information on inviting Plimoth Plantation to visit you, please go to We Can Visit You!

Speakers

Invite one of Plimoth Plantation’s captivating Pilgrim role players, Native speakers or historians to your next group meeting or function. Find out how at Professional Speakers.

Admission discounts are available for groups of 15 or more ages six and up.

Admission includes a self guided visit to the museum’s sites and exhibits.

If you need rate information for your school field trip or tour group, please call the group sales office at 508-746-1622, ext. 8358 during regular business hours (9am to 5pm Monday – Friday), or e-mail groupsales@plimoth.org.

 

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Scout Groups Field Trips

Cub Scouts Visit Plimoth Plantation

Plimoth Plantation is a great place for scouting out history!

To learn more about special programs, activities and events for scouts, including our annual Boy Scout Day and Girl Scout Day, visit our Scouting Page.

To learn more about what you’ll see and experience at Plimoth Plantation, go to What to See and Do.

For information about hours and rates, visit Hours and Prices. Please note that groups of 15 or more qualify for our special group rates.

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