Historical

Historical

Florida Museum of Natural History Logo.jpg
3215 Hull Road, Gainesville, FL, United States

Enjoy hundreds of exotic butterflies in a rain forest setting, witness a South Florida Calusa Indian welcoming ceremony, experience a life-size limestone cave and see a mammoth and mastodon from the last ice age.

Located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville and open year round, the Florida Museum is one of the nation’s top five museums with more than 34 million specimens, including one of the world’s largest collections of butterflies and moths.

Visitors are greeted by a 14-foot-tall, 16,000-year-old Columbian Mammoth discovered in the Aucilla River in northwest Florida. Ninety percent of the bones are fossil material, making it one of the most complete ever found.

Visitors in front of mammoth

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Guided Tour Options

Join a knowledgeable Museum docent or staff member for an in-depth tour and lecture of the Museum exhibits and related areas. Available from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. These tours are currently geared for an adult audience.

Butterfly Rainforest Exhibit Guided Tour

$11.50/person, 25 people max.

This tour is led by a Butterfly Rainforest staff member and lasts approximately 30 to 45 minutes. Information provided covers butterfly identification, the life cycle, nectar plants and other food sources in the landscaping, and Rearing Laboratory operations.

Butterfly Rainforest Exhibit VIP Tour

$20/person, 12-15 people max.

The VIP tour is led by the Butterfly Rainforest Exhibit Manager and lasts approximately one hour. The tour begins with the “Wall of Wings” display and information about the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity collections, and continues through the Butterfly Rainforest with information on butterfly identification and lifecycle, and nectar plants and other food sources in the landscaping. The VIP tour ends with a behind-the-scenes look in the Rearing Lab and information about its operations.

Florida Fossils Exhibit Guided Tour

$3/person, 40 people max.

Drawing upon the Florida Museum’s internationally acclaimed fossil collections, the award-winning Florida Fossils: Evolution of Life & Land exhibit describes the last 65 million years of Florida’s history. Walk through time beginning with the Eocene, when Florida was underwater, to the Pleistocene when the first humans arrived. Piece together a mystery skeleton to learn how paleontologists use fossils to understand periods of geologic time. This tour lasts approximately 60-90 minutes.

Florida’s Indian Peoples Exhibit Guided Tour

$3/person, 40 people max.

Archaeological evidence suggests people arrived in Florida about 12,000 years ago. Since then, Florida has been home to many groups of Indians including the powerful, extinct Calusa and the Seminoles and Miccosukee of today. How do we know about these people and their environment? Try your hand at rope making and examine artifacts while searching for answers to this question in three exhibits: South Florida People & Environments, Northwest Florida: Waterways & Wildlife and Dugout Canoes: Paddling through the America. This tour lasts approximately 60-90 minutes.

Highlights Guided Tour

$3/person, 40 people max.

Want to see it all? This special tour highlights selected sections of the Florida Museum’s world-renowned permanent exhibitions including Florida Fossils: Evolution of Life & LandSouth Florida People & Environment and Northwest Florida: Waterways & Wildlife. This tour lasts approximately 60 minutes.

Self-Guided Group Rates

Suitable for groups that prefer independent exploration of the Museum. Community Group rates available Monday through Friday for groups of 10 or more.

Free admission* to all exhibits except the Butterfly Rainforest and Surfing Florida/Surf Science. Children under three (3) admitted free.

Exhibit Dates Adult Child (3-17)
Butterfly Rainforest Year Round $7.50 $5.50
Surfing Florida/Surf Science 8/31/2013 — 1/20/2014 $3.50 $3
Best Value! Dates Adult Child (3-17)
Surfing Florida/Surf Science
& Butterfly Rainforest
8/31/2013 — 1/20/2014 $10.50 $8

Donations are accepted; suggested amounts are $6 for adults and $4 for children. Admission donations help support the Museum’s exhibitions and education programs.

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Scout Explorations

Let the Museum be a part of your scouting experience! Sign up your Boy or Girl Scout group for a weekend program to earn part or all of the requirements for many different badges, journeys, belt loops and pins.

Boy Scouts (Coming Soon!)

Cub Scouts: Wildlife Conservation (belt loop and pin), Collecting (belt loop and info for pin)

Boy Scouts: Collecting, Indian Lore, Insect Study, Archaeology, Basketry, Bird Study

Girl Scouts

Brownies trying digging activity

Brownies:

Journeys: WOW, Brownie Quest, A World of Girls

Skill Building Badges: Bugs, Home Scientist, Senses, Inventor

Juniors:

Journeys: Get Moving!, Agent of Change, aMUSE

Skill Building Badges: Flowers, Detective, Animal Habitats

Registration Information

Available times: Saturday 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 2-4 p.m.; Sunday 2-4 p.m.

Each program requires a minimum of 10 scouts with a maximum of 20. The Museum requires a 10 to 1 ratio of scouts per chaperone for all programs.

A deposit of $50 is required to reserve your troop’s spot.  Fees for all participants must be paid in one payment on the day of or before the program. The cost is $15 per scout and chaperones are free*.

Refunds will be made for cancellations received 5 business days before the scheduled program, minus a $20 administrative fee. Refunds will not be made for weather-related cancellations.

* There is an additional fee for programs that utilize the Butterfly Rainforest.

Please contact Amanda Harvey with your questions or to register at aerickson@flmnh.ufl.edu or 352-273-2062.

Make sure to check the Calendar of Events for all of our scout-friendly events where you can use the experience to work towards your belt loops, pins and badges!

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Outreach Programs at Florida Museum of Natural History (All Grades)

Bring the Museum to your classroom!

The Florida Museum of Natural History currently offers five Inquiry Box outreach programs for use in the classroom. A free 45-minute educational program using artifacts and natural history objects is delivered by museum staff or volunteers to enhance science and social studies lessons or Museum field trips.

Download Inquiry Boxes Flier

Inquiry Boxes may be kept in your classroom for two (2) weeks at a cost of $25/box, allowing students to further examine the hands-on items and other materials included in the box. Teachers will be responsible for returning the Inquiry Boxes to the Museum.

To reserve an Inquiry Box and presentation, please email carlislej@flmnh.ufl.edu or call 352-273-2026.

Outreach programs Available

Florida’s Butterflies & Moths

Suitable for: All ages but geared to K-4th grade

Participants will:

  • Learn about the life cycle of butterflies and moths.
  • Learn how butterflies and moths are similar and different.
  • Examine actual moths and butterflies found in Florida and discuss sizes, colors, and body parts.
  • Gain a better understanding of how important camouflage and adaptation methods are for survival.
  • Understand that Lepidoptera have scales covering their wings.
  • Experience how Lepidoptera see with their compound eyes.

The Florida’s Butterflies and Moths Inquiry Box (a large plum duffle bag) contains books (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, word cards, laminated teaching aids and a teacher’s guide (including a suggested approach sheet). This Inquiry Box features 14 shared boxes, each designed to be explored by 1-3 students.

Inquiry Box contents - Butterflies and Moths

Each shared box contains:

  • One clear plastic box containing 1 of 4 Florida butterflies
  • One box containing 1 of 3 Florida moths
  • Packet of cards for identifying the above (Within the 14 boxes, there are 7 different Florida moths and butterflies.)
  • 2 magnifying glasses
  • 2 eyepiece teleidoscopes
  • Packet of plastic life cycle parts
  • Butterfly finger puppet
  • This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

Educators’ Guide & Recommended Reading

 

Florida’s Reptiles & Amphibians

Suitable for: All ages but geared to K-3rd grade

Participants will:

  • Discover the great variety of reptiles and amphibians that make their home in Florida: crocodilians, snakes, lizards, turtles, frogs and salamanders.
  • Learn how reptiles and amphibians are the same and how they are different.
  • Hold a snake shed and learn why and how snakes shed their skin.
  • Learn what a tadpole is and how it is part of the transformation from egg to frog through the process called metamorphosis.
  • Discover the difference between warm blooded and cold blooded animals by using a simple thermometer.

The Florida’s Reptiles and Amphibian Inquiry Box (2 green suitcases) contains books (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, 6 replicas, word cards, laminated teaching aids and a teacher’s guide (including a suggested approach sheet). This Inquiry Box features 14 shared boxes, each designed to be explored by 1-3 students.

Inquiry Box contents - Reptiles & Amphibians

Each box contains:

  • Envelope A contains a real snake shed
  • Envelope B has a hands on camouflage activity
  • Envelope C contains a flat thermometer
  • Envelope D contains 6 frog metamorphosis cards
  • 2 sock puppets
  • Replica of a snapping turtle

This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

Florida’s Seminole People

Suitable for: All ages but geared to K-5th grade

Participants will:

  • Learn about the way of life of the Seminole people of Florida, both today and when the word Seminole first came into use.
  • Explore customs, clothing, food sources, housing, economics and government as a way to learn about these early Floridians.
  • Find out how adaptability and resourcefulness have led to the survival of the Seminole culture, after only a few Seminole escaped attempts at deportation.
  • Try on a Seminole vest or skirt and learn how the sewing machine changed the traditional clothing.

Inquiry Box contents - Florida's Seminole People

The Florida’s Seminole Peoples Inquiry Box (a black suitcase) contains books, (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, word cards, laminated pictures and teaching aids, replicas, sweetgrass basket, Seminole doll, patchwork samples, a vest and/or skirt, and more. There is a teacher’s guide which includes a suggested approach sheet. There are many hands-on articles along with a bingo-type game.

This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

 Teacher’s Guide to Florida’s Native People

This teacher’s guide may be used for Inquiry Box presentations, Inquiry Box loans and museum visits. The guide contains information on Florida’s Indian people, information on associated subjects and related fields of study, vocabulary and suggested activities. All activities are designed to integrate social studies, language arts, math and science in a unified learning experience. Permission is granted to reproduce the information and activities for student and teacher use. All guides are in PDF format.

Northern Florida’s Early Native People

Suitable for: All ages but geared to 3rd-5th grade

Participants will:

  • Investigate the lives of Florida’s early native peoples from the hunting-and-gathering Paleoindians to the farming Apalachee and Timucuan peoples.
  • Learn about their culture, community, clothing, games, houses, tools, food and trade items.
  • Find out how life changed in Florida after the arrival of European explorers.
  • Hold and explore replicas and ancient artifacts.

The Florida’s Northern Early Native People Inquiry Box (2 large royal blue suitcases) contains books (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, word cards, laminated teaching aids and a teacher’s guide (including a suggested approach sheet). This Inquiry Box features 14 shared boxes, each designed to be explored by 1-3 students.

Inquiry Box contents - North Florida Early Native People

Each shared box contains:

  • Celt
  • Chunky stone
  • Owl totem replica
  • Food packet (corn kernel, pumpkin seeds, dried bean, jerky, seashell, sunflower seed, peach pit, fish bones, acorns, shark tooth, and peas)
  • Trade bag (bell, glass beads, jewelry, mica, potsherd, quartzite, seashells, shark tooth, and string)
  • 2 pieces of terra cotta clay
  • Packet with fibers for cord making

This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

Teacher’s Guide to Florida’s Native People

This teacher’s guide may be used for Inquiry Box presentations, Inquiry Box loans and museum visits. The guide contains information on Florida’s Indian people, information on associated subjects and related fields of study, vocabulary and suggested activities. All activities are designed to integrate social studies, language arts, math and science in a unified learning experience. Permission is granted to reproduce the information and activities for student and teacher use. All guides are in PDF format.

Southern Florida’s Early Native People

Suitable for: All ages but geared to 3rd-5th grade

Participants will:

  • Discover the people who inhabited South Florida, descendants of the Paleoindians and Archaic people who came to Florida thousands of years ago.
  • See replicas of early Indian crafts – a wooden Ivory Billed Woodpecker plaque, a mask, a hammer, a scoop and the feline statue.
  • Find out what middens (old trash heaps) tell us about diet, culture, and climate.
  • Learn how the early people made cord and rope.
  • Read a translation from Spanish records about the Calusa.
  • Handle ancient tool artifacts – points, knives, drills, and scrapers.

The Southern Florida Early Native People Inquiry Box (a large red suitcase and a small red duffle bag) contains books (both fiction and nonfiction), a video, word cards, laminated teaching aids, replicas, artifacts, a timeline, a game, a sorting tray and a teacher’s guide (including a suggested approach sheet). This Inquiry Box features 14 shared boxes, each designed to be explored by 1-3 students.

Inquiry Box contents - South Florida Early Native People

Each shared box contains:

  • Sealed packet of 1000+ year old midden
  • Packet fishing gear – hook, net, net gauge, and illustration
  • Packet containing artifacts of tools with identification cards
  • Packet of fiber from which to make cord
  • Replica of the famous feline

This Inquiry Box was designed using the Sunshine State Standards and is intended to enhance FCAT preparation.

Teacher’s Guide to Florida’s Native People

This teacher’s guide may be used for Inquiry Box presentations, Inquiry Box loans and museum visits. The guide contains information on Florida’s Indian people, information on associated subjects and related fields of study, vocabulary and suggested activities. All activities are designed to integrate social studies, language arts, math and science in a unified learning experience. Permission is granted to reproduce the information and activities for student and teacher use. All guides are in PDF format.

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FAIRBANKS MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM VT.gif
1302 Main Street, St. Johnsbury, VT, United States

The Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium is much more than Northern New England’s museum of natural history — it is a place to marvel at the wonders of our world.  Perfect for families and visitors of all ages, the Fairbanks Museum invites you to explore your universe.

Inside our classic Victorian building, you’ll find a dazzling array of animals and artifacts, dolls and tools, shells and fossils, and much more! Take a trip through the cosmos in Vermont’s only public planetarium, and see weather forecasts in the works in our Eye on the Sky Weather Gallery. A full calendar of events, workshops, lectures and field programs invites everyone to explore the nature of our world.

 Inside, our collections include some 175,000 objects:

  • 75,000 natural science specimens (mounted birds, mammals, reptiles and fish; insects; nests and eggs; shells; fossils; rocks and minerals; herbarium)
  • 95,000 historical artifacts (tools; toys; dolls; textiles; weapons; archival photographs and documents)
  • 5,000 ethnological items representing Oceania, the Near East, Africa, Egypt, Japan and native North America.

The only public planetarium in the state of Vermont opened in 1961 and continues to offer guided tours of the cosmos every week.

Discover … Explore … Experience … Inspire …

CURRENT EXHIBITS AVAILABLE HERE

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We have prepared a wondrous array of curriculum guides to help teachers and parents create activities within the Museum and beyond its walls. Our aim is to inspire curiosity and self-directed learning, so that children become life-long naturalists, always interested in the world around them.

The Museum’s learning experiences take place in our awe-inspiring galleries, state-of-the-art Lyman Spitzer Jr. Planetarium, Nature Classroom, classic learning hall and outdoor space.

Contact us to plan your visit to the Museum.

For Educators:

The Museum’s Education team is ready to work with you and your school to help your students engage in active learning that excites them. Our curriculum guides are designed to meet VT State Standards.

The Museum is a fabulous and memorable destination for field trips! Let us help you plan this excursion.

Your class or group can come to the Museum for a field trip or for repeated learning experiences. Fees include 1 FREE chaperone for every 5 students.Choose from the following program options:

  • $5/student for a gallery tour
  • $8/student for 1 program
  • $10/student for 2 programs
  • Minimum rates apply for groups with fewer than 10 students.

Click here to plan your visit to the Museum.

Solar Slumber

It is easy to take the Sun for granted.  After all, it NEVER fails to shine, even if the clouds get in the way.  Recently, better technology has permitted astronomers to observe the Sun in great detail, revealing much more about the Sun.  It also shows many things we don’t know about the Sun.  While the Sun’s steady nature makes life on Earth possible, changes in daily, seasonally, and long-term solar activity affects our atmosphere, our satellites, and life on the Earth.

Students will learn to safely view the Sun, weather-permitting, and will observe (live or through images) details on the Sun’s surface.  Students will analyze data to discover patterns of solar activity, and then discuss the possible affects of the Sun on the Earth, including recent information about decreased solar activity.

NGSS: ESS1.A, ESS1.B, PS3

 Solar Slumber
 bell

BOING!

Does sound cause movement?

Does movement make sound?

How does sound travel through the air?

Discover the properties of sound while making some of your own sounds.  Develop basic musical instruments to test your observations.  Using tools and ourselves, we will discover what makes sound and what does not. By the end we will solve the problem of how to use our bodies to demonstrate how sound traverses distance.

NGSS: 1-PS4-1, 1-PS4-4

Werewolves, Vampires and Zombies!

Parasites and Poisons that can control our minds!

Although there are no supernatural monsters in this lesson, we will explore the ways in which real parasites have taken over their hosts, and how they may have inspired monster myths! Have you ever wondered what happens to a person who contracts rabies? Could parasites be responsible for some people’s reckless and dangerous behavior? Could toxins and poisons in nature cause people to behave like monsters themselves? This lesson is ideally suited for Third Grade through Middle School students.

NGSS: 3-LS4, 4-LS1, MS-LS1, MS-LS2, MS-LS3, MS-LS4

 dracula
 

Have a Ball!

What goes up must come down, but that law of motion doesn’t mean all objects travel on or through all surfaces the same.

Your students need only bring their innate curiosity and their creative and critically thinking minds to be ready for this class!

 

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Delve into our Solar System and beyond in the Lyman Spitzer, Jr. Planetarium!

Planetarium experiences can expose your students, club members or community group to the stars and constellations, our moon, the planets, even concepts like orbits and gravity.

Planetarium Topics

  • Our Solar System
  • American Indian Star Stories
  • Tonight’s Skies
  • The Moon
  • Mythology and the Stars

Plan your visit to the Lyman Spitzer Jr. Planetarium


Our staff meteorologists, the voices of the Eye on the Sky weather broadcasts, are also our weather educators.
What better source could there be for learning about the science behind weather and climate!

Introduction to Weather Instruments

What kinds of tools does a weatherperson use to measure what’s going on in the air? How do they work? Thermometers (liquid and bimetallic), anemometer, wind vane, barometer, psychrometer and rain gauge are explained and passed around for close inspection. A brief trip to the Weather Center and the Instrument Shelter closes the time.
Duration: 50 minutes, flexible for K (can include Weather Center/Instrument Shelter).
Suitable for grades K-3


Weather Center and Instrument Shelter

The title says it all! A guided view of the Northern New England Weather Center, including instruments and telecommunications equipment; then a quick trip to the Instrument Shelter for an explanation of its workings.


 

Weatherlore

Before computers, The Weather Channel, even the Old Farmer’s Almanac, forecasting the weather was a do-it-yourself project. And so, through hundreds of years of observing the weather, reliable signs were compiled and passed on, becoming those quaint country quips like when the cows lay down at midday, rain in on the way. Yet most, if not all of these bits of weather wisdom work. A look at the sayings, the science behind them, and a way for you to use them to forecast your own weather.
Appropriate for all ages.


 

How Do We Make a Forecast?

A day in the Life of a Meteorologist
An explanation of the process of making a weather forecast. We cover everything from taking local observations; through mapping regional, national, or hemispheric observations and using satellite imagery; to using computer model output. By the end your students should have a good understanding of how a meteorologist organizes his or her thoughts when faced with the task of figuring out the weather from 2 hours to 2 weeks into the future.
Best for Grade 4 & up.


Weather a la Carte!

  • Wind
  • Pressure
  • Temperature
  • Moisture

These lessons could be presented one of two ways:

  • A short lesson focusing on one of four topics, with a “hands on” activity to follow, or,
  • A longer lesson focusing on one of four topics, with follow up materials provided for your class to conduct “hands-on” experiments back at school.

Suitable for students from Kindergarten to the third grade.

Plan your Weather Program visit.

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Slater Mill Museum.gif
67 Roosevelt Avenue, Pawtucket, RI, United States

Located on the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Slater Mill is a museum complex dedicated to bringing the American Industrial Revolution to life.

Come and enjoy our tours, exhibits, collections of artifacts, gallery, research library, theatre, gift shop, and more. Slater Mill offers concerts, demonstrations, lectures, meeting spaces for rent, family programs, specialized tours, holiday programs and exhibits of fine crafts and artwork. Along with our on-site programs, we offer an extensive selection of curriculum-based programs for schools and entertaining presentations for social clubs and community groups.

Slater Mill tells the story of innovation, labor, artisans, women’s rights, cotton economy, immigration and assimilation, and industry. It is culturally, educationally and historically important for people of all ages and origins to be able to come, see, touch, learn and be inspired at Slater Mill.

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Summer Camp & Scout Groups Trips

Slater Mill is the birthplace of modern American industry. As part of their visit, students will be taken through three buildings:

In the Slater Mill, opened in 1793, students will see the original factory floor and machine layout as it was in Mr. Slater’s day. Interpreters will guide students through the history of the industrial revolution, periodically bringing the tour to life with various demonstrations of the still-working factory equipment.

In the Wilkinson Mill, opened in 1810, students will see the machine tool shop used to service Mr. Slater’s original mill. Students will see a working 16,000 pound water wheel in the shop’s wheel pit. Upstairs, our interpreters will explain how the factory transferred power from the Blackstone River into real working machines. Students will see massive gears moving overhead that power the still-functioning drills, lathes, and other machines.

In the 1758 Sylvanus Brown House students will see how a middle class artisan family would have lived in the late 18th century prior to the industrial revolution. Here, interpreters will demonstrate pre-industrial manufactures techniques so students can better understand the true meaning of the factory manufacturing methods they will see in the other buildings.

Students will also visit the nearby Visitor Center, which features a large floor map and a film that lend historical background and modern perspective to the students’ visit.

One travel guide describes their Slater Mill visit: “We were frankly startled by the completeness fo this exceptional visitor attraction…Interpreters have a remarkable amount to show you…There’s nothing quite like this.”

Mister Carl

Jencks Education Center at Slater Mill

Established in memory of Davis Jencks, The Jencks Education Center is Slater Mill’s major initiative to link knowledge of the past with the rich opportunities of modern Pawtucket. The Center hosts a variety of arts and handcraft workshops, educational programs, after school learning opportunities, and business and group events. In conjunction with the Center , the Slater Mill Gallery across Roosevelt Avenue in the Visitor Center exhibits the work of local and national artists and craftspeople. The adjoining gift shop serves as an outlet to purchase their work.

The Jencks Education Center is located on the physically accessible second floor of Slater Mill. The Board of Trustees has made a deliberate choice to honor the historic character of the interior of Slater Mill. With the exception of a bit of paint and floor repair, the Center maintains the building’s historic authenticity. Our architect, Luke Mandle, designed fixtures and furnishings that reflect an industrial feel as opposed to a colonial reproduction style that would confuse visitors and chip away at the true integrity of the mill space.

Education Center

Our Jencks Education Center

The Innovation Room is a gorgeous space with banks of windows overlooking the Blackstone River on three sides. This room serves up to 60 people and has been outfitted with conference/work tables using recycled textile machinery as bases. It is fully wired for technology. The room serves rental needs for retreats, corporate meetings, community programs, the Mill’s own interpretation programs with school children and as a space for workshops with regional and national craftspeople.

The Confluence Room is an extremely inviting library with large, comfortable seating and warm lighting. It also serves as a breakout space for meetings held in the Innovation Room.

Conference Room

Conference Room

The Artifact Access Space use an innovative collection storage method (currently being put into use at the RISD Museum and across the country) called “visible storage” to bring our vast collection to the public. We rotate exhibitions of tools, historical documents, textiles, printing items, early hand machines, and other items so that students, historians, artists and the public can study, read, draw and explore the fantastic collection that was once hidden away in a physically inaccessible third floor archive.

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Dinosaur State Park.jpg
400 West Street, Rocky Hill, CT, United States

Welcome to Dinosaur State Park

The Connecticut Valley has a long history of fossil track discoveries. Outstanding specimens uncovered in 19th century brownstone quarries found their way into museums throughout the world. A new chapter in the history of such discoveries was written in 1966 when hundreds of tracks were exposed in Rocky Hill. This remarkable site became Dinosaur State Park.

Outdoor activities include walking trails that lead past 25 life-size concrete and steel dinosaurs. See the creatures that roamed the state up to 230 years ago on the Connecticut Trail; try out Monty’s Splashpad, a state of the art interactive water play. Inside, kids can continue their discoveries in the Bone Zone, where they can dig for faux fossils, dig for crystals, pan for gold and do not leave without shopping in the 10,000 square foot retail area.

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Summer Camp Groups All Ages and Grades

Grades 1-5 Fun with Fossils – Travel back in time to learn what Connecticut was like at the time of the dinosaurs, and what we can learn about dinosaurs from their footprints and other fossils. Students will examine a variety of fossils and dinosaur models to learn about what made dinosaurs unique. Core Science Standards 1.2, 3.2, 4.2, 4.3
Grades 3-5 Rocks & Minerals Around Us – The rocks and minerals around us tell a story of dramatic changes in Connecticut over hundreds of millions of years. We also use many of these materials in our lives today. Students will examine samples of rocks and minerals from around Connecticut, explore their distinctive properties, and discuss ways we use these materials. Core Science Standards 3.1, 3.3, 4.3
Grades 6-8 Connecticut Landforms  – The Connecticut landscape around us today was shaped over hundreds of millions of years by colliding continents, erupting lava, flowing water, and massive ice sheets. Students will learn how these forces interacted by examining the shape of the land surface and samples of bedrock from key locations around the state. Core Science Standard 7.3
Grades 9-12 Evolution – Find out how the dinosaur footprints in Connecticut relate to the larger story of evolution through time, beginning with Earth’s earliest lifeforms and leading to the rise of the mammals in the Cenozoic. Choose from a timeline activity examining key evolutionary events, or a fossil-dating activity. Core Science Standard 10.5
Grades 9-12 Earth Systems – The dinosaur footprints and rocks found in Connecticut provide evidence for the cycling of matter and energy through the Earth system. Students will examine rock samples from Connecticut and piece together the exciting story of moving plates and changing environments that made Connecticut what it is today. Core Science Standards 9.1, 9.4, 9.5, 9.7, and 9.8
Also available at the Park:
  • Outdoor Casting Area – Make a plaster cast of a dinosaur footprint (seasonal -bring own material).
  • Mine for Gems and Fossils in our outdoor mining sluice (seasonal – additional fee applies)
  • Outdoor Picnic area
  • 2 1/2 miles of hiking trails
  • Bookstore – contact us for information about pre-purchased “Treasure Bags” for your group.

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Scout Troop Programs

Complete your Geologist Activity Pin at Dinosaur State Park!

Webelos Workshops are scheduled on specific Saturdays.

Contact the Park Office for future dates.

Check In: 8:30 a.m. – 9 a.m. Program: 9:15 a.m. – 1 p.m.

The Webelos Workshop provides an opportunity for scouts to complete the requirements of the Geologist Pin in a unique geologic setting. The program will begin with a short introduction by the park geologist, followed by activities at three stations located in the Dinosaur State Park exhibit center. These stations will explore fossils, how mountains are formed, and common uses of rocks and minerals. Scouts will also view a film about volcanoes and hear a “Track Talk” about the dinosaur tracks and rocks found in the park. The park geologist will be available to answer questions throughout the program. Groups are encouraged to allow additional time to explore the exhibit center and nature trails on their own. The program will be held rain or shine.

Time: Doors open for check-in at 8:30 a.m. The Program begins PROMPTLY at 9:15 a.m. and continues until 1 p.m. The schedule includes time for either an optional live animal demonstration or free time in the exhibit center or at bookshop.

Costs: $7 per scout includes regular admission to exhibit center, a Dinosaur State Park patch, and the cost of materials for scheduled activities. Adults and children accompanying the scouts will be charged the regular museum admission fee ($6 for ages 13+, $2 for ages 6-12, and free for 5 and under).

Registration: Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. Programs fill quickly so mail your registration and payment as soon as possible. Space is limited to 60 scouts. Print out the registration form and the roster form to complete your registration. Go to Registration Form — Go to Scout Roster

Payment: Payment in full must be received at least 7 days in advance of the workshop. Please complete the form and return with payment to Dinosaur State Park, 400 West St. Rocky Hill, CT 06067. Checks should be made payable to Treasurer, State of Connecticut.

Changes and Cancellations: A refund will be issued for any changes or cancellations made at least 7 days prior to the workshop. No refunds will be issued for changes or cancellations after this date.

Lunch: A half-hour lunch period is included in the program. Please bring your own lunch, since no food is available for sale at the park. There is a large outdoor picnic area; no indoor facilities are available for lunch. Workshop will be held rain or shine. You may choose to have lunch on your own time after 1 p.m., and use the lunch period as free time instead.

Other Activities: The park includes a picnic area, more than 2 miles of hiking trails, a track-casting area (May- October), and a mining sluice (weather dependent; for an additional fee). You may wish to allow additional time to enjoy these activities.

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Boston Childrens Museum.jpg
308 Congress Street, Boston, MA, United States

For over 90 years, Boston Children’s Museum has served as a leader in Boston and within the museum community. Boston Children’s Museum engages children and families in joyful discovery experiences that instill an appreciation of our world, develop foundational skills, and spark a lifelong love of learning.

It is a private, non-profit, educational institution that is recognized internationally as a research and development center and pacesetter for children’s exhibitions, educational programs and curriculum. Boston Children’s Museum focuses on three key areas of expertise: visitor programs, teacher resources and early childhood education.

Since its founding by teachers a century ago, Boston Children’s Museum has been a leading destination for memorable field trips and outside-the-classroom learning. We welcome visiting groups from schools, community groups, afterschool programs, childcare centers, and even colleges and corporations to roll up their sleeves, learn together, and interact with our world-class exhibits and staff. We support learning by providing real objects and direct experiences that encourage imagination, curiosity, and questioning. Our environment is informal, but our purpose is serious!

EXHIBITS AND PROGRAMS

WAYS TO SAVE 

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For information about organizing your visit, reservations, and policies please explore the sections below.

You can start a reservation right now by clicking the Request a Reservation here or by calling our Groups Coordinator between 9am-4pm, Monday through Friday. We recommend initiating reservation at least two weeks in advance. If you have any questions, feel free to contact our Groups Coordinator at 617-426-6500 x405 or e-mail GroupVisits@BostonChildrensMuseum.org

Boston Children’s Museum offers two types of group visits:
Do-It-Yourself Visits and Program Visits. Both types of visits are eligible for sponsorship.

Two Hour Do-It-Yourself Visits
Cost: $10 per student
Two Hour Do-It-Yourself Visits offer groups the opportunity to explore our many exhibits and public programs at their own pace, following the childrens’ curiosity and imagination. Children and their chaperones are likely to discover some very thought–provoking activities—and in doing so develop lifelong interests and skills.

Program Visits
Boston Children’s Museum offers several educational programs suitable for children in grades 1 and up. We offer one hour and two hour programs, hands-on experiences and a place where children’s imagination and creativity is encouraged through play and educational activities.
Single Program Visits
Cost: $13 per student (50 student maximum)
Single Program Visits consist of a one-hour educator-led program and one hour of do-it-yourself museum exploration.Double Program Visit
Cost: $18.50 per student (50 student maximum)
Double Program Visits consists of two different programs, one hour each, and a bonus hour of Museum exploration.
Please note: Double Program Visits cannot be sponsored.
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A Day in the Life of a Japanese Child
“Always a fabulous culmination of our Japan unit.”
“Educator is knowledgeable, patient, organized, prepared and clear!”

Take off your shoes and step into an authentic 100-year old house from Kyoto, Japan! Your students will experience a typical day for a Japanese child and will discover what customs, artifacts, and aspects of home and school life in Japan are similar to, and different from their own.

We provide cultural immersion and hands-on activities in the Kyo-no-Machiya (the Japanese House) using contemporary stories, objects, and images.

Age recommendation: Grades 1 – 6. Specially arranged programs are also available for Grades 7 through 12. Adaptations to connect with your curriculum may be available.

Standards Met: History and Social Science: 1.1, 1.6, 2.1, 2.3, 2.6, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9,G6 NEA

English Language Arts: 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5, 4.3


Balls & Tracks

“Staff is knowledgeable and engaging. The program is simple enough to understand, but with opportunities for complexity and thought.” —Ken A., 2nd grade teacher

“Students had a wonderful time and learned how to work together, to test their creations on a regular basis and that science is FUN!” —Carol M., 5th grade teacher

After observing gravity, friction and momentum in action in the Raceways exhibit, your class will work in groups to design their own unique Raceways track. Kids are the engineers as each team of students designs a roller coaster track using only the materials given to them. In addition to putting their problem-solving skills to work, your students will improve their teamwork abilities. The design challenges will be adjusted to suit your grade.

Age recommendation: Grades 2 and up


Money Matters
Money Matters is an early financial literacy program designed especially for students in grades K-4. In this exciting one-hour program, students can role-play as wage earners in our Boston Black exhibit, discuss important community roles and jobs, and “spend” the money they’re earning at the local barber shop, flower store, corner market and restaurant. Together as a group they will explore the many ways that members of a community rely on each other for goods and services. This program aligns with Massachusetts Standards in both Economics and Mathematics.

Age recommendation:Grades K-4


Global Stories

If objects could talk…

Boston Children’s Museum has been collecting objects from around the world for nearly 100 years. In this new school program for Grades 2-4, we invite students to put on white gloves and take a closer look at the Museum’s collections. We’ll open our eyes to just how much we can learn from careful observation of a single cultural artifact and what it tells us about its origins: Who made this? What is it for? What is it made of? Is it old or new? Where is it from? What makes you think so?

This multidisciplinary program will feature selected collections pieces representing Europe, Latin America, North America, Asia, and Africa*. Using a variety of media, students will explore the geography and culture behind the objects, how form fits function, and common threads across the human experience. Students will then incorporate these concepts into an original 2D or 3D work of art inspired by their observations.

Age recommendation:Grades 2-4, Grade 5 by special arrangement

Alignment with Massachusetts frameworks:

Visual Arts for K-4: 1.2, 2.5, 3.1, 6.1, 8.1

History and Geography: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.4


*A note to educators: we have some flexibility to select objects that align with your classroom units and grade frameworks; for example, we sometimes can accommodate requests for Native American or Chinese objects. Call or email us for more information.

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Saratogo Automobile Museum Logo.jpg
110 Avenue of the Pines, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States

Saratoga Automobile Museum

Welcome to the Saratoga Automobile Museum where we preserve, interpret and exhibit automobiles and automotive artifacts. We celebrate the automobile and educate the general public, students and enthusiasts regarding the role of the automobile in New York State and in the wider world. In addition to technical and design aspects, our educational focus is on the past, present and future social and economic impact of the automobile.

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Saratoga Automobile Museum

Field Trips

Grade/age level specific field trips have been designed to engage and educate all students.  Each program begins with an introduction to our Museum and the history of the automobile in New York State, followed by a guided tour of each exhibit.  Programs conclude with a “Traffic Safety” music and craft project (for pre-k and elementary students) and a “New York State Auto Archaeology” scavenger hunt for middle-high school students.

*Each student will receive a gift bag from the museum containing practical, fun and informational materials.
Cost: $5.00 per student (Chaperones are free).

SAM’s Garage

SAM’s Garage is a place where children learn about cars while gearing up for life.

Programs at SAM’s Garage encourage non-traditional, multigenerational learning opportunities for underserved children utilizing historic automobiles. The goal is to help students increase their understanding and proficiency in math, science and history, while helping them to improve their desire to stay in school, develop strong leadership skills and healthy community relationships. Previous projects include the restoration of the iconic Ford Model TT Popcorn Wagon seen at many of the Museum’s summer auto and lawn shows, and a Model A Huckster built from scratch.

The Museum has also served as a host for the Pinewood Derby with local Cub Scouts, provides an education area inside the museum where students can learn about cars and racing and during the Holidays, welcomed Santa Claus to its garage.

The mission of the Saratoga Automobile Museum is to preserve, interpret and exhibit automobiles and automotive artifacts.

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Atlanta Cyclorama Logo.png
Atlanta Cyclorama & Civil War Museum, Cherokee Avenue Southeast, Atlanta, GA, United States

Take a stirring journey through time in Atlanta’s Cyclorama. Sit at the center of a sweeping panorama of the Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864, during the American Civil War.

On that day Confederate troops led by General John B. Hood made a desperate attempt to save Atlanta from the encircling Union armies. They were initially successful, but the Union troops, led by Major General William T. Sherman, regained positions lost earlier in the day and won the battle. By nightfall, more than 12,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing.

The Cyclorama painting — 42 feet tall and 358 feet in circumference — is said to be the largest painting in the world. It offers breathtaking realism enhanced by a foreground of three-dimensional figures and terrain. The presentation is accompanied by music and narration, available in five languages.

When you visit the Cyclorama in Atlanta’s Grant Park you can also see artifacts of the war displayed in the Civil War Museum and a steam locomotive known as the Texas, a veteran of the Great Locomotive Chase of 1862.

Summer Camp & Scout  Group Programs Available 

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Summer Camp & Scout Trips The Atlanta Cyclorama

Give your Students a field Trip back in history as they take a stirring journey through time in Atlanta’s Cyclorama. Sit at the center of a sweeping panorama of the Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864, during the American Civil War. The Atlanta Cyclorama offers a unique inside look into the past of Atlanta Georgia in time of Civil War. A School Field trip to the Atlanta Cyclorama offers a panoramic presentation of the Battle of Atlanta with authentic military artifacts from the period.  Students on their School field trip will also have the opportunity to see and understand the past of the Civil war through a number of different mediums offered by the Atlanta Cyclorama.

Tour Information

Tours

Tour guides conduct a 40-minute, two-part educational program on the Battle of Atlanta every hour on the half hour from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The program includes special lighting, sound effects, music and narration (available in English, French, German, Japanese and Spanish).

Part I

A 14-minute film is shown detailing events that led to the Battle of Atlanta.

Part II

Students on their Group Field Trip are escorted into the Cyclorama to experience the battle. On a second rotation through history, guides explain the history of the painting and answer audience questions.

Attractions

Movie

A 14-minute film shows events leading up to the Battle of Atlanta.

The Painting

The Cyclorama of the Battle of Atlanta is the world’s largest oil painting, painted in 1885-86 by artists from Germany. It has been shown in Grant Park since 1893.

Diorama

The three-dimensional foreground, called a diorama, was added in 1936, bringing a depth of 30 feet to the display.

Civil War Museum

Artifacts from the American Civil War period are displayed on two floors and include weapons, photographs and uniforms. A touch-screen computer system tells the story of the war. Other videos recount period history and Cyclorama restoration.

Steam Locomotive Texas

The centerpiece of the museum is the steam locomotive Texas, which played a key role in the Great Locomotive Chase of 1862 (also known as Andrews’ Raid). The Texas was used by the Confederates to pursue and recover the locomotive General, stolen by Union raiders led by James J. Andrews. The raiders planned to tear up tracks behind them to disrupt the vital Western and Atlantic Railroad supply line between Atlanta and Chattanooga. The General is currently on exhibit at the Kennesaw Civil War Museum in Marietta, Georgia. The Great Locomotive Chase was the subject of a Disney movie in 1956.

Bookstore

The Cyclorama bookstore offers a wide selection of books and other items on the American Civil War period.

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Academy-of-natural-science.jpg
1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA, United States

The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University is America’s oldest natural history museum and a world leader in biodiversity and environmental research. For 200 years, the Academy has explored the remarkable diversity of our natural world, sharing these discoveries with the public through extraordinary collections, innovative exhibits, educational programming, and publications.

Summer Camp & Scout Group Trips (All Grade levels)

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 Discovery Lessons:

Participate in an in-depth investigation of the natural sciences. Through these interactive classroom experiences, your students will develop important scientific skills, from making observations to designing experiments and interpreting data. Please note that Discovery Lessons can only be booked Tuesdays through Fridays.

All lessons have been developed to meet Educational Standards, including Pennsylvania State Standards, New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards, and Philadelphia Core Curriculum Grade Levels.

We offer a variety of Discovery Lessons for grades Pre-K–23–6, and 7–12.

The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University is an approved entity for the School District of Philadelphia. The paperwork is on file with the School District of Philadelphia Risk Management Office.

Self Guided Visits:

Take your students on an exciting exploration of the natural world. Our three floors of exhibits, ranging from dinosaurs and dioramas to hands-on interactive stations, are sure to make your field trip to the Academy the highlight of the school year.

All Programs, Special Events and Permanent Exhibitions can be found clicking here!

Hands-on Programming

Outside In

Experience the outdoors—inside! A tortoise, rabbit, legless lizard, and hissing cockroach are just a few of the live animals that you might meet in our discovery center. Investigate different habitats, examine a real meteorite, search for fossil footprints, dig for shark teeth, watch a working beehive, and more!

Pre-K–4th Grade 
35 minutes

$40 for 10-30 students or

$75 for 31-60 students Reservations required

The Big Dig

Let’s go fossil hunting! Become a field paleontologist and dig for dinosaur fossils in a setting straight out of the badlands. Academy educators teach you how to use the tools of the trade, supervise the digging, and help identify fossil finds.

Pre-K–5th Grade

20 minutes

$30 for 10-30 students or

$55 for 31-60 students Reservations required

To Register for Any of these Programs please click here

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Scouting

scouts posing with a dinosaur

The Academy is a terrific place for Scouts! We offer exciting activity days, popular Safari Overnight sleepovers, and interactive daytime workshops designed to help scouts earn badges. In addition to scheduled programs, private workshops can be scheduled for scout groups of 20–30, and private overnights can be arranged for groups of 100–300. Check out specific programs below. We look forward to seeing you at the Academy!


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Portland Museum of Art Logo.jpg
7 Congress Street, Portland, ME, United States

The Portland Museum of Art, founded in 1882, is Maine’s oldest and largest public art institution. The Museum’s architecturally significant buildings unite three centuries that showcase the history of American art and culture. The Museum’s collection of more than 17,000 objects includes decorative and fine arts dating from the 18th century to the present. The heart of the Museum’s collection is the State of Maine Collection, which features works by artists such as Winslow Homer, Marsden Hartley, Rockwell Kent, John Marin, Louise Nevelson, and Andrew Wyeth. The Museum has the largest European art collection in Maine. The major European movements from Impressionism through Surrealism are represented by the Joan Whitney Payson, Albert Otten, and the Isabelle and Scott Black Collection, which include works by Mary Cassatt, Edgar Degas, René Magritte, Claude Monet, Edvard Munch, Pablo Picasso, and Auguste Rodin. The Elizabeth B. Noyce Collection, a bequest of 66 paintings and sculptures, has transformed the scope and quality of the Museum’s American collection, bringing to the Museum its first paintings by George Bellows, Alfred Thompson Bricher, and Jamie Wyeth, and adding masterpieces to the collection by Childe Hassam, Fitz Henry Lane, and N. C. Wyeth. In addition to exhibitions, the Museum has constantly changing educational programs, family festivals, lectures, art classes, musical concerts, bookgroups, art camps, gallery talks, and much more.

The Museum’s collection is housed in three architecturally significant buildings

Mauch Chunk Museum.jpg
41 West Broadway, Jim Thorpe, PA, United States

Jim Thorpe, PA, formerly Mauch Chunk, is a small picturesque Pennsylvania town with a fascinating history. Established in a wilderness on the banks of the Lehigh River in 1818, Mauch Chunk became a bustling coal transportation center, tourist Mecca, and the esteemed seat of Carbon County by the middle of the 19th century.

Riding the wave of prosperity along river, canal, Switchback Gravity Railroad and overland railroads as ‘black diamonds’ (anthracite coal) were transported by increasingly efficient means, famous as the “Switzerland of America” to 19th century rail excursionists, the town declined economically in the 20th century when petroleum replaced coal in home and industry and rail excursion tourism was replaced by the automobile.

Summer Camp & Scout Trips

Discover how the industrial outpost of Mauch Chunk became a prosperous coal shipping town and 19th century tourist Mecca, second to Niagara Falls in popularity. Relive the town’s glory days when coal was King and tourism Queen. Learn of its economic demise and bizarre resurrection as Mauch Chunk traded its name for the name and body of 1912 Olympic hero, Jim Thorpe. Discover the feats and demons of Jim Thorpe,”The Greatest Athlete in the World.”

Commencing with an overview and tour of the Mauch Chunk Museum, courses follow the historical continuum:

  • Industrial Outpost in a Wilderness
  • The Lehigh Canal:Lifeline of the American Industrial Revolution
  • Mauch Chunk’s Amazing Rollercoaster: The Switchback Gravity Railroad
  • Mauch Chunk’s Millionaires & The Social Scene
  • The Tourist Influx
  • Economic Decline
  • Mauch Chunk Trades Its Name for a Body
  • Jim Thorpe: All American
  • Revitalization
  • Arts/Crafts courses

Field Trips

  • Lansford #9 Anthracite Mining Museum
  • Asa Packer Mansion
  • Old Jail (site of the Mollie Maguire hangings in Carbon County)
  • Mauch Chunk Lake Park
  • Carbon County Environmental Education Center
  • Bus Tour of Jim Thorpe area

The story of Mauch Chunk is brought to life by video, images, artifacts, and four working models:

  • A water filled, working model of Josiah White’s Bear Trap Lock, a collapsible water powered lock which permitted trains of coal arks to travel down the Lehigh River.

  • standard lock on the Lehigh Canal

  • An operable miter lock and drop gate lock on the Lehigh Canal.

  • A 30 ft replica of Mauch Chunk’s famous Switchback Gravity Railroad which progressed from a coal carrier to a passenger carrier of such magnitude that Mauch Chunk, “The Switzerland of America,” became second to Niagara Falls as a 19th century tourist destination.

American Museum of Natural History Logo.jpg
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West, New York City, NY, United States

 

The American Museum of Natural History is one of the world’s preeminent scientific and cultural institutions. Since its founding in 1869, the Museum has advanced its global mission to discover, interpret and disseminate information about human cultures, the natural world and the universe through a wide-ranging program of scientific research, education and exhibition.

The Museum is renowned for its exhibitions and scientific collections, which serve as a field guide to the entire planet and present a panorama of the world’s cultures.

The Education Department creates learning opportunities for learners of all ages, from preschoolers to seniors, at the Museum, at home, in school, and in the community.

Teachers and students can take advantage of the exciting programs and offerings throughout the year. Plan your visit to the Museum. Parents can explore resources at home and in the community.

Groups Visiting Outside New York City Please click the image below for rates and information

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Prepare for and Book Your Visit – Camp or Scout Group

Please note that these pages are for planning NYC and tri-state area school and camp group visits. If you are a school or camp group from outside New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut, please visit the Group Sales page.

There’s a reason we’re a top field trip destination in New York City: amazing new exhibits, over 32 million objects in our permanent collections, and exceptional programs, resources and classes for students and teachers!

Follow these simple steps to plan an unforgettable museum learning experience for your students or camp group.

  1. Get Started!

    With five exhibit floors to explore, less is more! Select a Hall of Focus, sign up for a student program, or get tickets to a Special Exhibition, IMAX Film or Space Show. All of our programs are designed to support the NYC K-8 Scope and Sequence for Science and Social Studies.

    Permanent Exhibitions Special Exhibitions And Shows
    Programs for School Groups For Educators: Guides and Resources
  2. Prepare For Your Day

    Get ready for your visit with these important Museum policies and procedures.

    Price and Payment Lunchrooms
    Museum Conduct Download Museum Map
    Arrival and Departure
  3. Book Your Field Trip

    Book your field trip at least 5 weeks in advance. If you have changes (new field trip date, reduction/increase of reservation numbers, or cancellations), please call Central Reservations 14 days before your visit to receive a refund.

    Before you call Central Reservations to book your field trip, please use the Reservation worksheet to map out your day at the Museum. Keep it handy to expedite your call!

COMPLETE YOUR RESERVATION WORKSHEET 

IMPORTANT DETAILS
Occasionally some halls in the Museum may be closed. To ensure that the specific hall you are coming to see is open, please call the Museum 5 days before your visit at (212) 769-5100 and listen for the weekly hall closings.

Open your confirmation packet immediately! The Museum will only send out one confirmation packet per group and it will be addressed to the one who made the reservation. The packet will confirm your Museum itinerary.

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Kalmar Nyckel Wilmington Delaware.jpg
1124 E 7th St, Wilmington, DE, United States

The Original Kalmar Nyckel

The original Kalmar Nyckel was one of America’s pioneering colonial ships. Its historical significance rivals that of the Mayflower, yet her remarkable story has never been widely told.

Did you know…

The original Kalmar Nyckel sailed from Sweden to the New World in 1638 leaving its passengers to establish the first permanent European settlement in the Delaware Valley, the Colony of New Sweden in present-day Wilmington, Delaware. She made a total of four roundtrip crossings of the Atlantic—more than any other ship of the era. Her first voyage to the New World left 24 settlers of Swedish, Finnish, German and Dutch descent in the Delaware Valley. Joining them was a black freedman who sailed from the Caribbean aboard her companion ship the Fogel Grip.

The Present Day Kalmar Nyckel

The present day Kalmar Nyckel serves as Delaware’s seagoing goodwill ambassador. She was built by a group of committed citizens to be a continuing witness to the courage and spirit of those individuals who undertook the mid-winter North Atlantic crossing in 1637-1638.

Since 1998, the ship has served as an outreach platform for the State of Delaware and a catalyst for social and economic development. The ship provides a unique platform for the Foundation’s educational programming as well as a venue for diplomatic, recreational, governmental and commemorative functions. The ship is owned and operated by the Kalmar NyckelFoundation, a non-profit organization that offers people of all ages a variety of sea and land based learning and recreational experiences.

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Summer Camp & Scout Field Trips

Find more information about the Kalmar Nyckel including its specifications and History through the years by clicking the Image Above.

Join our award-winning ship and shipyard programs for fun, learning, and adventure.  As a full-scale re-creation of the colonial ship that brought the first permanent European settlers to Delaware and the Delaware Valley,Kalmar Nyckel is one of the world’s great educational resources.

Students get to travel back in time to the “Age of Sail” and rediscover Delaware’s fascinating colonial and maritime history.  Our typical ship and shipyard program can handle up to 84 students a day — with three (3) “underway” stations on the ship and four (4) interactive stations on land.  The program usually takes about 4 hours.  Participants engage in “hands-on history,” discovering that learning is fun and that fun can be informative.

Our ship and shipyard programs are available in a variety of formats and can be tailored to meet the academic needs of any group.

Be sure to learn more about our interactive education programming by viewing this short film detailing our “Starting A Colony” program.

Please contact the Kalmar Nyckel Foundation office at 302.429.7447 or sheed@kalmarnyckel.org for program pricing and additional information.

Please visit our 2013 Education Schedule for more information.

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Scouting Programs

Education Scouting Programs

Come aboard Kalmar Nyckel for a scouting adventure of a lifetime.

Earn a Kalmar Nyckel Scout Patch by participating in our interactive ship and shipyard programs.  Learn how to tie nautical knots, haul active lines, and raise sail with our Captain and expert crew.  Learn more about Delaware’s maritime and colonial history.  Sing authentic sea chanteys with Kalmar Nyckel’s merry band!

BOOK YOUR TROOP Today!

Please contact the Kalmar Nyckel Foundation office at 302.429.7447 or sheed@kalmarnyckel.org for program pricing and addtional information.

All Scouts Welcome!

Education Scouting Programs

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Harness Racing Museum New York.jpg
240 Main Street, Goshen, NY, United States

This unique and educational museum offers something you are not likely to find elsewhere: the history of Harness Racing. A popular event these days, harness racing has been hailed as the original Great American Pastime.

Housed in a beautifully restored gentleman’s stable, the Museum features exhibits of antique sulkies and sleighs, trophies, lifelike statuary, paintings, Currier & Ives prints, and more. And a realistic 3-D Harness Racing Simulator gets the blood flowing!

Follow the trail of Hambletonian, one of the most famous horses in harness racing. This lucky guy made his name not by racing — he was raced only once — but by siring over 1,300 foals. He was a champion, and Hambletonian blood dominated the breed of trotting and pacing horses and continues to do so today. The Hambletonian Stake, first raced in 1926 at the New York State Fair, has remained one of the sport’s premiere events and today is run at the Meadowlands for a purse exceeding one million dollars.

Individuals and families will enjoy this museum, as as well as the special events that take place here throughout the year. Visitors to the Museum will also want to visit neighboring Historic Track, the world’s oldest track, where horses and their trainers can be seen working out. Special races are held here, and those interested should call for details.

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Race to a new adventure with your Summer Camp or Scout Group!
Innovative education programs at the


Take lessons out of our book and race to the Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame for an educational adventure your students will always remember. Our innovative school programs use the American Standardbred horse and the sport of harness racing to illustrate concepts in mathematics, history, science, language arts and more.

The museum is located in the historic village of Goshen, NY, known as “The Cradle of the Trotter” for its origins in the sport of harness racing and America’s first national pastime. Within our museum are many examples of local, state, national and international history and art; artifacts dating from harness racing’s beginnings to modern times; hands-on and interactive exhibits, a 3-D harness racing simulator, a chance to see real horses train at Goshen Historic Track located directly behind the museum and more. These resources offer students of all ages the opportunity to expand lessons presented in the classroom in a unique an unforgettable way!

Duration of programs is approximately two hours, except where noted.
Each program is $4.00, except where noted.

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Our educational programs use the Standardbred horse and the sport of harness racing as a teaching tool for boy and girl scouts of all levels. Each participant explores the museum to learn something new appropriate to his or her level. Scouts also receive a take-home booklet and patch, plus everyone makes a craft and takes a ride on the 3-D harness racing simulator.

Scout patch programs may include the following:

  • Viewing an introductory film about the sport of harness racing
  • Discovering the local heritage of the Standardbred breed of horse and of Hambletonian 10, the Standardbred’s founding sire
  • Distinguishing the difference between a pacer and a trotter
  • Learning about the variety of horseshoes and their uses
  • Visiting the Good Time Stables, a part of Harness Racing Museum and finding out what makes a good stable
  • Examining harness racing equipment and sitting on a sulky or sleigh (seasonal)
  • Measuring a Standardbred horse
  • Learning common knots for leading and haltering a horse
  • Identifying the sounds and facial movements horses make to communicate
  • Calling a harness race
  • Creating a horse-themed craft
  • Riding the 3-D harness racing simulator

Cost is $8 per scout. Leaders are admitted free.
Siblings are welcome to participate at a reduced rate (no badge or booklet given)

For more information or to reserve your group
contact the Education Department at education@harnessmuseum.com or call 845-294-6330

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2 Institute Drive, Concord, NH 03301, United States
(603) 271-7827 (W-F 8 AM-5 PM)(603) 271-7827 (W-F 8 AM-5 PM)
(603) 271-7832

Hidden in Concord, New Hampshire is the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center. An educational journey to this Discovery Center is sure to appeal to anyone and everyone. The Discovery center offers has an amazing collection of innovative, interactive exhibits to explore engaging in anything from into the exploration in astronomy, aviation, earth and space science.

Visitors can finds themselves immersed in a world of its own delving into an excellent learning environment with programs designed for all ages! With a state of the Planetarium theater to high tech observatory to workshops for younger audiences and educators, there is something for everyone at this Discovery Center in Concord, New Hampshire. Come Experience New England’s premier Space Science and Air Center. 

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Groups of all ages visit the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center, from Red Hat Ladies and Scouts to summer campers and senior center field trippers! Groups of 15 or more paying visitors qualify for our group general admission rate of $7 per person! Add planetarium show tickets to your visit for an additional $5 per person; check our calendar for the show schedule of the day you’d like to visit. We recommend reserving show tickets in advance as there is limited seating in the theater; please call Visitor Services at (603) 271-7827 x0 to reserve your tickets.

Please click on the following to learn about more fun activities we have available for groups of all sizes!

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scout workshops

The Discovery Center also offers overnight programs!

Scouting

Girl Scouts

NEW! Juniors – “Get Moving!” Journey Workshop – learn about energy use and light pollution.
A 2-hour workshop can be tailored for all Girl Scout pathways to help complete new badges and journeys in the “Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting” and the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Workshop includes a planetarium show and hands-on activities.

Boy Scouts

  • Astronomy Merit Badge
  • Aviation Merit Badge
  • Space Exploration Merit Badge

We can also help with Cub Scouting! Please call and we will help set up an appropriate workshop.

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Essex Steam Train and River Boat 1.jpg
Railroad Avenue, Essex, CT 06426, United States

Essex Steam Train & Riverboat’s 2½-hour journey begins at the historic 1892 Essex Station for a 12-mile, narrated round-trip into the heart of the unspoiled Connecticut River Valley – designated “one of the last great places on earth” by the Nature Conservancy.

The steam locomotive pulls vintage coaches at 20 mph through the quintessential New England towns of Deep River and Chester. The picturesque countryside includes pristine meadows, a quaint farm, a millpond with waterfall, and trestles and bridges over rivers and creeks. A natural highlight is the undeveloped Selden Neck State Park, accessible only by boat.

Essex Steam Train offers unique access to several coves and preserves, immersing passengers in an on-board eco-excursion. The train travels near the tidal wetlands of Pratt Cove and Chester Creek – – bountiful, natural habitats for birds. Among those typically spotted are Cormorants, Ducks, Swans, Greenland Geese, Blue Heron, Egrets, and Red-winged Blackbirds. In February and March, the majestic Bald Eagle is the star of the show, when it migrates south to the Connecticut River Valley from Canada and Maine.

At Deep River Landing, passengers are escorted onto the Becky Thatcher riverboat for a 1¼- hour cruise along the Connecticut River. The visual serenity of the river valley is on full display from Becky’s multiple decks. The deep water, coves, inlets, marshes, wildlife, and rocky shoreline are all at once, simply breathtaking! Just as impressive are the historic sights including Gillette Castle, Goodspeed Opera House, and the Haddam Swing Bridge. Upon Becky’s return to Deep River Landing, the steam train welcomes passengers for the return trip back to Essex Station.

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Group Field Trips
Take your group back to the glory days of steam! They’ll enjoy the comfort of our restored vintage rail cars and get an unobstructed view of the unspoiled beauty of the Connecticut River Valley from our multi-deck riverboat. It’s a wonderful trip any time of year.We offer special rates for groups of 20 or more with advance reservations – contact our Groups Ticket Sales. We also can arrange for special private charters on our steam train and/or riverboat. Pleasecontact our office for more information. Group Sales in Office
Box Lunches
Trackside Café Groups can arrange for box lunches from ourTrackside Café. Your group can enjoy:

  • Sandwich (Choice of Ham, Turkey, Roast Beef)
  • Potato Chips and Cookie
  • Choice of Bottled Soda, Water, or Juice

All lunches must be consumed at the Essex Depot picnic area or on the boat – there is no eating or drinking allowed on the train.

Box Lunches must be ordered at least 5 business days before the date of your visit. Please give us a call for pricing and with any questions!

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